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Full text of "Savannah State College Bulletin--Special Issues"

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/savannahstateco196163sava 






Challenge of the Sixties 




We are mindful of the Sixties, 
Yes, most mindful we be; 
As the*' Savannah is ever 
•mindful 
Of its rendezvous with 
the sea. . 



Our democratic faith is a faith in the whole human being. We are concerned for the 
individual's life and health, his security and comfort; but even more we must be concerned 
for the fulfillment of his highest aspirations . . . 

Cultural interests and creativity are flowering in all parts of the nation. The Ameri- 
can people are participating in the creation and performance, as well as enjoyment, of 
art, music, literature, drama and dance as never before . . . 

. . . The encouragement of spiritual and cultural growth is every bit as essential to 
our future as the nurturing of our material welfare. 

The Challenge to America — 
Rockefeller Brothers Fund 



COVER: Savannah State College twin majorettes, Frances and Frankie Southerland of Fitzgerald, Georgia. 




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PRESIDENT' 
MESSAGE 





K. Payne, President of Savannah State College. 



Savannah State College is glad to observe Annual Homecoming each year. The greeting of alumni, 
f r students, and interested friends is one of the highlights of the academic year. Since it comes in the Fall, 
I nishes inspiration and drive to reach higher standards and new achievements. 

As we greet our alumni, new acquaintances, and friends of long standing, we are conscious of two vital 

sses. On the one hand, there is always something to see: while on the other hand, there is something to feel. 

year friends and visitors returning to the College are able to see a number of additions to and improve- 

s in the physical plant. The College is continuing to upgrade its physical facilities and to raise its academic 

lards in the light of present day needs and programs. 

Along with greetings to the Savannah State College alumni, we extend greetings to our visitors from 

ama State College. The long record of fine relationship in college athletics with the faculty and student 

of Alabama State College heightens our enjoyment of this occasion. The football teams representing the 

olleges will furnish a contest which contributes toward the high aims and ideals of each institution. When 

\ot is fired for the end of the game, we wish to say that the contest was a display of the finest quality of 

late sportsmanship. 





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Mrs. Mattie B. Payne, wife of the President and "First 
Lady" of Savannah State College. She is also coun- 
selor at Beach Senior High School, Savannah, Georgia. 




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Emma Sue McCrory, "Miss Savannah State College," 61-62, Senior, 
majoring in English, from Columbus, Georgia; Dorothy Brown, 
Senior, majoring in Mathematics, from Metter, Georgia; Juanita 
Quinn, Senior, majoring in Social Science, from Savannah, Geor- 
gia, both attendants to Miss Savannah State. 



On such a day as. this. I' think, 

On such a day as this; 

When earth and .sky and nature -whirl, , 

Clad in .a. springtime bliss. 

When balmy zephyrs gently press 

Against the chtek a kiss; ^» . 

Sufficient is it just to live W 

On such a day as "this. 

Georgia Douglas Johnson 




"Miss Senior," Annette Kennedy, 
Senior, Social Science major, Sa- 
vannah, Georgia. 









1 ifefc»a»_* 




"Miss Junior," Freddie Liggins, 
majoring in English. 



"Miss Sophomore," Margaret 
Brown. 



"Miss Freshman," Artvetta Doanes. 




"Miss Camilla Hubert Hall," 
Dorothy Moss, Freshman, Glen- 
wood, Georgia, majoring in Busi- 
ness Administration. 




One stone.the more swings into place 
In that dread temple of thy worth. ■ 
It. is enough that through thy* Grace, 
I saw. naught common on Thy Earth. 

Take not th$ vision from. my. ken — 
"Olv whatso'er may spoil us. speed. 
Help me. to need no aid-from men' 
That J may help' such men as need. 





Anna Cooper, Junior, majoring 
in Home Economics, from Savan- 
nah, Georgia, is "Miss Delta 
Sigma Theta." 






''Kiss v 

rr eni or tPeta," r 









w.neVS> ' a io»i 







"Miss Business," Nancy Ann 
Scott, Sophomore, Business Ad- 
ministration major, Savannah, 
Georgia. 



Think truly, and thy thoughts 

Shall the world's famine feed"; ■ .; 

Speak truly, and each wojd of thine 
Shall lie a fruitful seed; 

Live truly, and thy life' shall be 

A great and noble creed. . 

Horatius Bonar 




t 



MS%, 




"Miss Omega," Helen Woods, 

Senior, Elementary Education, 

Savannah, Georgia. 



Miss YWCA," Bettye Hansford, 
Junior. 





"Miss YMCA," Veronica Owens, 
Sophomore, English major, Sa- 
vannah, Georgia. 




'Miss Western Culture," Ker- 
metta C. Clark, Freshman. 




"Miss Alpha Phi Alpha," Delores 
Clark, Sophomore, of Savannah, 
Georgia, majoring in Mathemat- 
ics at Savannah State College. 



'Miss Social Science," Loraine 
Brown, Freshman. 






"Miss Scrollers," Delores Bowens, 
Sophomore. 



"Miss SNEA," Gwendolyn Camp- 
bell, Senior, majoring in Mathe- 
matics. 



"Miss Wright Hall," Winifred 
Hopkins, Senior, Business ma- 
jor, Bainbridge, Georgia. 













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u 




1 I 

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f 1 



"Miss Technical Science," 
Frankie Strickland, Sophomore. 




"Miss Kappa," Emily Snype of 
Savannah, Georgia, a Junior 
majoring in Elementary Educa- 
tion. 



It is not growing like a tree 
In -bulk, doth make men better be, 
Or ■s.tanding. long an~ oak, three ■hundred year, 
A Lilly of a day 
■■■• Is fairer far in May; 
Although it fall and die that night . •_ 

It was the plant and flower of light. 
In small proportions we just beauties see 
And in short measures life may. perfect be. 

• . • Ben Jonson 



58270 






Left to Right, first row: William, Collier, Thomas Adams., Willie 
SimmOns, Thomas Williams, Bernard Lewis, McArthur Pratt, 
Thomas Glover, John Amos, -Connie. Cater. Second row: Jerome 
Nixon, Oree Rawls, Hershel Robinson, Calvin Roberts, Leroy, 
Major, Fred Meyers, Willie Howard, James Carthon, George John 
son. Third row: B. C. Carsw&lL, David. Oliver, Gene Wilcher,.Bobbj 
Lockett, Herbert Wright, Bobby DunbaT» Fred Carter. Fourth row: 
Rohert Saxby, Coach Al Frazier,' Henry Saunders, Head Coaqh 
Richard K. Washington, Coach Marifm Mendenhall, Tommy. 
Davis, Benjamin Spann, Moses Herring. 




<c^2^o^, : 



Theodore Wright, Athletic Director. 




SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

State College Branch 
SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 



Number 
Blue White 



70 
8] 
83 

82 
84 

80 



76. 

75 
52 



62 
66 
64 
61 
60 
63 



67. 
81 
.76. 
82 
83 
80. 



Class Ht. 
ENDS 



Adams, Thomas . . 

Carter, Fred 

Rawls, Oree 

Robinson, Hershel 
Saunders, Henry 
Williams, Thomas 



6'1" 
6'0" 
6'0" 
6'2" 
6'2" 
6'0" 



TACKLES 



74 Lewis, Benard 1 6'0" 

75 Lockett, Bobby 1 6'G" 

56 Oliver. David 2 6'1" 

77 Spann, Benjamin 2 6T" 

GUARDS 

69 Carthon, James . . . , 3. . 5'11' 

64 Howard, Willie 1 5'10' 

. 65. . Johnson, George 2 5T0' 

61 Pennemon, Robert 1 5'9" . 

60 Simmons, Willie . ...1. ,5'11' 

63 Wilcher, Eugene 2 6'0" . 



1961 FOOTBALL ROSTER 



He 



Town 



182 Evansville. ind. 
172 . Steubenville, Ohio 
178 Wayeross, Ga. 
175 Savannah, Ga. 
188 Savannah, Ga. 

183 Steubenville, Ohio 



210 Steubenville, Obi: 

189 Macon, Ga. 

210 Winter Park, Fla 

210 Macon. Ga. 



180 Thomaston, Ga. 

170 Savannah, Ga. 

220 Orlando, Fla. 

168 Charleston, S. C. 

185. . Steubenville, Ohio 

190 . Macon, Ga. 



Number 
Blue WhiU 



Nar 



53 
51 



31 

32 



54 



16 


18 


11 


11 


14 


14 


33 


16 


12 


12 


30 


30 


10 


15 


15. 


17 


13 





31 
32 



Class Ht. Wt. 
CENTERS 



Roberts. Calvin 
Wriaht, Herbert 



5'9".-. 175. 
5'11". 169 



QUARTERBACKS 

Dunbar, Bobby 2 5'7". 

Herring, Moses 1 57". 

Pratt, McArthur 1 ,5'10" 



157 
159 
169 



HALFBACKS 



Amos, John 
Carswell, B. C. 
Davis, Tommy 
Major, Leroy 
Saxby, Robert 
Cater, Connie 



... 2 


57" . 


161 


... 2 


57". 


159. . 


2. 


5'11" 


163.. 


.2 


6T" 


182 


1. 


5'8" . 


.164 . 



FULLBACKS 



Glover, Robert 
Meyers, Fred 



5T0" 
,5'9". 



172 
180 



Home Town 



Savannah, Ga. 
Beaufort. S. C. 



Jacksonville, Fla. 
Macon, Ga. 
Miami, Fla. 



Jacksonville, Fla. 
Wayeross, Ga. 
Columbus, Ga. 
Charleston, S. C. 
Savannah, Ga. 



Columbus, Ga. 
Beaufort, S. C. 



Coaches: A. Frazier, M. Mendenhall, C. Miller. Head Football Coach: R. Washington. Manager: Roscoe Edwards. Trainers: Frank Tompkins, 
Sidney Williams. Sports Writer: Therman Thomas. Statistician: Wendell Chisolm. Athletic Director: T. A. Wright. Publicity Director: Wilton 
C. Scott. 





' "Is?, football- playing • - ... - 

Along- the .'river shor^, .: '..* *», 

'With lads to chase the leather, 7 • * ^. 
•'■' N§w- I. stand up no.\more?""* -."•.. .' 

Aye;.t}ie ball is flying. '■ '•"•.- .-•.-..;.' .'. 

Tile lads-pla.y heart 'and .st>yl; . ' -. - 
The goal stand?, up-,, the keeper 
" • Stands up to keep the goal. 
.'..■•■ • • .Alfred Edward Housman 



^*^ACa 



Richard K. Washington, 
Physical Education in- 
structor and football 
coach. 



Dr. Elmer J. Dean, Pro- 
fessor and Head, Depart- 
ment of Social Science, 
Savannah State College, 
Chairman of Athletic 
Committee 







Fred Meyers, Fullback 
(32) runs interference for 
Quarterback McArthur 
Pratt (14) in the Chatta- 
hoochee Classic. 



McArthur Pratt (14), 
Moses Herring, Willie 
Howard (64), Bobby Lock- 
ett, David Oliver show 
tension in the Fort Valley 
State game. 





Savannah State College Cheer Leaders (from left to 
right) : Georgia Mae White, Senior, Physical Education 
major, Macon, Georgia; Doris Kennibrew, Sophomore, 
English major, Hamilton, Georgia; Cassandra Sexton, 
Freshman, Mathematics major, Savannah; Mary Law, 
Sophomore, Biology major, Savannah; Jennie Gresham, 
Freshman, Physical Education major, Marietta, Georgia; 
Irene Elmore, Freshman, Business Education major, Sa- 
vannah; Linda Dart, Freshman, Physical Education ma- 
jor, Savannah; Marjorie Delida, Junior, Social Science 
major, Savannah; Dorothy Carter, Junior, English major, 
Manchester; and Lillie Cummings, Freshman, Elementary 
Education major, Brunswick, Georgia. 




Savannah State College's band on parade in downtown 
Columbus, Georgia. 




George Johnson, 230 lbs. 

Sophomore Guard, Val- 

dosta, Georgia. 




No., by my soul; I never in my life 

Did hear challenge urg'd more modestly, 

Unless a brother should dare' 

To gentle exercise and proof of arms. 

Shakespeare 



James Carthon, 178 lbs., 

Junior Guard, Thomson, 

Georgia — Drake High. 







Hershel Robinson, 185 lbs., 

Sophomore End, Atlanta, 

Georgia — South Fulton. 



Gene Wilcher, 195 lbs., 
Sophomore Tackle, Ma- 
con, Georgia — Ballard 
Hudson. 



Tommy Davis, 169 lbs., 
Sophomore Halfback, Co- 
lumbus, Georgia — Spenser 
High. 



Bobby Lockett, Tackle, 203 
lbs., Sophomore, from Ma- 
con, Georgia, a graduate 
of Ballard Hudson High 
School. 







Co-Capt. Calvin Roberts, 

185 lbs., Junior Center, 

Savannah, Georgia — 

Tompkins High. 



B. C. Carswell, 175 lbs., 
Senior Halfback, Way- 
cross, Georgia — Center 
High. 



Bobby Dunbar, 160 lbs., 

Sophomore Quarterback, 

Reidsville, Georgia — 

Douglas Anderson High. 



David Oliver, 200 lbs. 

Sophomore Tackle, Bain- 

bridge, Georgia — Huger- 

ford High. 







Savannah State College Co-Ed, 

Gwendolyn Roberts, relaxes on 

campus. 



Shellman sisters, Lottie, Senior ma- 
joring in Home Economics; Frances, 
Freshman; and Bertha, Freshman. 
Library in background. 






Dora Miles, Savannah State College 

Senior, relaxes in front of Student 

Union Center. 




What sudden bugle calls us in tHe- night :'-"' 

And wakes us. from a dream that we had shaped;. 
Flinging' U6- sharply up against a. 'fight ' 

We thought we" had escaped? 
Itij3.no. easy wakings and we win ■ 
': ^ No. final peace; our victories ale. few. 
But still imperative forces pull' us in 

And sweep us somehow through. 
.Summond by a supreme and confident .power 

That wakes our sleeping courage like .a Wow, | 

.We rrse, half-shaken, .to the challenging hour, 



And answer- it — and go 



Louis Unterrneyer 



The Technical Science Building, Savannah State's newest 

building. 



Robbie Williams, Savannah State College Co-Ed, relaxes 
on campus. In background is Wright Hall, Dormitory for 

Men. 





ALUMN] 




Mrs. Jacqueline W. Stephens, '60, is Miss Alumni 

of 1962 and to the left her attendant, Mrs. L. 

Orene Hall, '41, and to the right Miss Pauline 

Jordon, '41. 




Miss Elizabeth Dupree, teacher 
in Glynn County. 



Mrs. Eva C. Boseman, teacher a 
Tompkins High School, Savan- 
nah, Georgia. 



Miss Louise Owens, Assistant 

Professor in English, Savannah 

State College. 






Dr. H. M. Collier, Jr., Alumnus of 
Savannah State College, is a 
Physician in Savannah, Georgia. 



Prince Mitchell, Bookkeeper, 

Business Office, Savannah State 

College. 






Miss Carolyn Campbell, Teacher 
in Macon, Georgia. 



10 



N PARADE 





A little work, a little play 

To keep us" going — and so. good day! 

A. little warmth, a little light 

Of love's bestowing — : and so. good-night! 

A ' little fun to match the sorrow 

Of each day's.. 'growing, and so. good morrow. 

. A little ttust that when we die 
We reap # oiir sowing*! And so— -good-bye! 

■ _' • .. • George du Maurier 




Mrs. Alice B. Williams, Postmis- 
tress, Savannah State College. 






Kennedy C. Childers, Area Su- 
pervisor, Agriculture Extension 
Service at Savannah State Col- 
lege. 



Mrs. Ida Gadsden, Assistant Pro- 
fessor in Education, Savannah 
State College. 



Mrs. Carrie B. Powell, Assistant 
Club Agent, Agriculture Exten- 
sion at Savannah State College. 






Nelson R. Freeman, Dean of 
Men, Savannah State College. 



Timothy C. Meyers, Dean of 
Faculty at Savannah State Col- 
lege. 



Mrs. Vera Brown, Clerk in the Agriculture Exten- 
sion Office at Savannah State College. 



11 






Mrs. Margaret C. Robinson, Biol- 
ogy Instructor at SSC and Stu- 
dent Council Adviser. 



Mrs. Lula Smith, Dean of Alumni 
Activities and retired school 
teacher, graduated from Savan- 
nah State College in 1901. 



Mrs. Lillie Allen Powell, Secre- 
tary in the Office of Public Re- 
lations at Savannah State Col- 
lege. 






Lizzie T. Williams, teacher at Sol 
C. Johnson Laboratory School of 

SSC. 



Mr. Frank Tharpe, General 
Chairman of Homecoming Com- 
mittee. 



Samuel Gill, Instructor in Fine 
Arts and Band. 



President Payne smiles --as he addresses 
.v. . • .Savannah- State College Alumni. 




12 



THE SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE BULLETIN 

President Dr. William K. Payne 

Editor-in-Chief Wilton C. Scott 

Feature Editor J. Randolph Fisher 

Editorial Assistants Lillie Allen Powell '58; Julia Elaine Cheely, '62; Therman Thomas, '64 

Photographer Robert Mobley 

Alumni Editor Prince Jackson, Jr. 



Volume 15 



October 1961 



Number 1 



The Savannah State College Bulletin is published yearly in October, December, February, March, April, and May by 
Savannah State College. Second Class mail privileges authorized at Savannah, Georgia. 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

vs. 
ALABAMA STATE COLLEGE — MONTGOMERY, ALA. 

November 4, 1961 - 2 P. M. 



Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics 



Dr. E. J. Dean, Chairman 
Emanuel A. Bertrand 
Miss Albertha Boston 
Miss Mary Ella Clark 
C. Vernon Clay 



Mrs. M. H. Dixon 

Dr. Raymond W. Hopson 

Prince Jackson, Jr. 

B. J. James 

Frank Tharpe 



Richard Washington 
Theodore A. Wright 
James Dixon 
Bobby Hill 



Committee on Homecoming Activities 



Frank Tharpe, Chairman 

Mrs. Geraldine Abernathy 

Felix Alexis 

Mrs. Martha Avery 

Eddie Bivins 

Leroy Brown 

Arthur Dwight 

Mrs. Ella Fisher 

Samuel Gill 



Miss Doris Harris 
Miss Luella Hawkins 
Prince Jackson, Jr. 
Charles Philson 
Wilton C. Scott 
Ernest Brunson 
Benjamin Colbert 
Otis Cox 
Shelton Daniel 



Willie Goldwire 

Miss Margaret Hayes 

Alvin Jones 

Miss Emma S. McCrory 

Miss Dorothy Monroe 

Jerome Smith 

James Tribble 

Willie Wilkerson 



r **» J? ft** J* "• 




Savannah State College Co-Eds, Gwendolyn Roberts and Dora Miles, relaxing in front of the College Library. 






SAVANNAH 

STATE 

COLLEGE 




GENERAL 

INFORMATION 

BULLETIN 



EORGIA 




DR. W. K. PAYNE, President 

Savannah State College 



Administering of Tests and Dates 

CEEB-College Entrance Examination Board August 8, 1962 

Graduate Record Examination July 7, 1962 

National Teacher Examinations July 28, 1962 

Placement Examinations September 17, 1962 

Miller Analogies Test Is Given Whenever- Requested 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

GENERAL INFORMATION BULLETIN 
Savannah, Georgia 



The college is located in Chatham County, and in the metropolitan city 
of Savannah, Georgia's oldest city and chief seaport. 

The campus, comprising one hundred and thirty-six acres, presents a 
setting of matchless natural beauty. Among the more outstanding are the 
attractively designed and modernly constructed Camilla Hubert Hall; Adams 
Hall; Meldrim Hall, consisting of administrative offices, the auditorium, 
and some classrooms. 

There are several new buildings on campus which include: A million 
dollar technical building; a half-million dollar library; Wiley gymnasium, 
which is annexed to Willcox Gymnasium; Richard R. Wright Hall; a sewage 
disposal system, and a heating plant. 

The science building has been remodeled, and the College has a lan- 
guage laboratory equipped with various types of machines, and a reading 
clinic with modern facilities. Hill Hall has been remodeled and now houses 
a beautiful center, post office, snack bar, book store and the offices of 
Student Personnel Services, and Testing and Guidance. Morgan Hall has 
been remodeled and houses the business department. The college infirmary, 
a modern eighteen-bed infirmary is provided for students who require treat- 
ment or confinement or minor illness, has been remodeled. 



Page 1 




Students Heading Toward Dining Hall, Science and Technical Buildings 




One of the Country's 

Most Beautiful 

Campus 



Another Campus 
Scene 




Page 2 



PURPOSES OBJECTIVES OE THE COLLEGE 

%P mm m ww^m WmXWw ^P mmvm MM w III MM Mw ^w m m mm mmt ^86? *W IKniMlvi MM 



Savannah State College, a unit of the University System of Georgia, is a college of applied arts and sciences, teacher 
education, business administration, and industrial technology. 

The college has two main purposes. It affords students an opportunity to acquire an education that will enable them to 
live effectively in a democratic society. It provides continuing educational and cultural services for the people of Georgia. 

A worth-while education, as the faculty conceives it, demands the full, rounded development of the individual. Consistent 
with this large purpose the institution has several major objectives. Specifically, the total college program is designed to help 
students: 

1. To gain basic preparation, personal qualities, and skills which are essential alike to further study, earning a 
living, and personal well-being; 

2. To understand the nature of mental, emotional, and physical health and to practice habits conducive to sound 
personal and community health; 

3. To attain a sharp awareness of social and civic responsibility and live daily as good citizens; 

4. To understand the common phenomena of man's physical environment and use scientific advances for human 
welfare; 

5. To cherish a discerning knowledge of man's cultural heritage, respect for foreign peoples and cultures, and aes- 
thetic appreciation of the creative artistic expressions of the human spirit: 

6. To know and live by those moral and spiritual values which refine and exalt human life. 

To attain these objectives the college (a) offers formal instruction organized within seven divisions — Business Adminis- 
tration, Education, Humanities, Natural Sciences, Social Sciences, Technical Sciences, Home Study; (b) selects and upgrades 
teachers, counsellors, personnel workers, administrative and auxiliary services personnel; (c) gives students due responsibility in 
making their own educational decisions and performing work-aid duties, participating in government of the college, extra- 
class activities, campus life, and religious services; (d) draws upon all available intellectual, cultural, technical, and spiritual 
resources to enrich the lives of students. 

Briefly then, every teacher, every facility, every arrangement here selves two main purposes. It is that boys and 
girls may develop into mature men and women who live effectively in the community, the state, and nation. It is that life 
may be made richer for the people of Georgia. 




THE INTELLECTUAL CENTER 
OF THE CAMPUS 



The library of a college is one of its most prized possessions. 
The adequacy of its resources and the nature of its services to 
students and faculty largely determine the quality of the academic 
program. On the Savannah State College campus, the library is 
an indispensable unit which undergirds the instructional program 
as well as contributes to the recreational reading interests. The 
library is not an adjunct to teaching but the heart of the learning 
process. 

Centrally located on the campus, the recently built building of 
modular construction provides excellent library facilities which make 
the library a compelling educational force in the life of the college 
students. One of the most pleasant features of the building is the open stack area; therefore, there are no barriers between 
books and readers. Completely air conditioned, the library includes two spacious main reading rooms, periodical reading 
area, circulation department, reference department, curriculum materials center, a music room with listening equipment, a 
seminar room, three private studies, an audio-visual center, a processing department and a staff lounge. 

The library staff and faculty are busy assembling a notable book collection to be used in active support of the academic 
curriculum. Assembling a book collection is not enough! The librarian and his staff actively encourage students to use 
books with an emphasis on the role that books play in the intellectual life of the academic community. The resources of 
the library include 33.748 volumes, several -thousand pamphlets, 463 periodicals and 22 newspapers. The London Times, 
The New York Times and the Savannah Morning News are on microfilm. 

As the intellectual center of the campus, the library offers the students, faculty and members of the community a variety 
of services. 

"Let's Listen to a Story Hour," under the direction of Miss Althea Williams, Circulation Librarian, is held weekly for 
the children of the community. Dr. Samuel Johnson said that "Those who do not read can have nothing to think and 
little to say." Since Dr. Johnson is highly regarded in our community, a Great Books Discussion Group, under the sponsor- 
ship of the library has been organized to encourage people to read and meet together to discuss great books. 

Mr. R. W. Gadsden, a retired educator, and Mr. E. J. Josey, Librarian, are the co-leaders of the group. Exhibitions of 
paintings by some of the world's great artists are displayed in the library periodically. A recently inaugurated lecture series 
has truly made the library a market place of ideas. 

All in all, the library of Savannah State College is an essential instrument in the life of the academic community. 



Page 3 



State College comprises the general curriculum, areas of 
a. The program is organized within these seven divisions: 

The Division of Natural 
Sciences 

Department of Biology 

Department of Chemistry 

Department of Mathematics and Physics 

The Division of Social Sciences 

The Division of Technical 
Sciences 

Department of Home Economics 
Department of Industrial Technology 

The Division of Home Study 



The formal instructional program of Savannah 
major and minor concentration, and terminal curricu 

The Division of Business 
Administration 

The Division of Education 

Department of Elementary Education 
Department of Secondary Education 
Department of Health, Physical Education 
and Recreation 

The Ov- ■■.■■tow 01 Humanities 

Department of English 
Department of Fine Arts 
Department of Modern Languages 

THE GENERAL CURRICULUM 

The General Education Program at Savannah State College proposes to provide opportunities for all students 
to acquire the hasic skills, attitudes, habits, appreciations and understandings that are requisite for the good life. 

It seeks to guarantee to all students competency in communication and thinking. It further proposes to 
orient the students toward and to sensitize them to human and universal good and to the worth and dignity of 
every human being. 

At this College, the general curriculum is preoccupied with the major disciplines that: 

1. Acquaint the students with broad areas of knowledge and human experience; 

2. Gives them an understanding of themselves and their culture and physical environments; 

3. Provide the students with a sound intellectual and moral foundation upon which character and profes- 
sional and vocational opportunities may rest. 

The program is generally concerned with freshman and sophomore students. However, some attention is 
devoted to students on the junior and senior level of their intellectual maturation. In this respect, general educa- 
tion is an integral phase of the experience of all students who matriculate for a degree at the college. 

The General Education Program is under the general supervision of the General Education Committee and 
the Coordinator of General Education. The Committee consists of students and faculty members. The present 
membership for this year includes: Dr. E. K. Williams, chairman, Mrs. A. C. Curtright, Mr. F. D. Browne, Dr. 
C. A. Christophe, Mrs. F. F. Harrington, Mr. H. M. Jason, Mr. M. V. Winters, Mr. Charles Frazier, Mr. John 
Kight, and Miss Verdelle Lambert. 



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A high school student, who is preparing for a career in 
Business via the college route, should direct his efforts to- 
ward becoming proficient in Mathematics and English at the 
high school level. Proficiency in Mathematics allows him 
to make quick use of quantitative tools in solving business 
problems. Proficiency in English permits him to communicate 
his ideas. The ability to do both are significant attributes of 
business personnel. 

Though not essential, since the college offers the neces- 
sary fundamentals, a student may also take such courses as 
Bookkeeping, Shorthand, and other business subjects which 
are offered at his respective high school. Since more and 
more high school students are arriving at college with typing 
skills, it is recommended that a course in Typewriting be 
taken. 

One of the advantages of majoring in Business is that 
one is preparing himself for a wide variety of employment 
possibilities. Opportunities exist for self-employment, for 




Page 4 



employment in private industry, and for employment with the 
government — national, state and local. 

Some positions, for which training in business at Savan- 
nah State College is designed to prepare a student, include: 

Entrepreneurs Secretaries 

Accountants Stenographers 

Bookkeepers Typists 

Salesmen Business Managers 

Economists Teachers of Business 

To realize the aims of a person desiring training in 
Business, Savannah State College's Division of Business offers 
courses leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science, and a 
terminal, two-year program leading to a certificate of pro- 
ficiency. 

A student who pursues a degree in Business, at this 
institution, may concentrate his efforts in one of the following 
areas: (1) General Business Administration, (2) Accounting, 
(3) Economics, (4) Secretarial Science, and (5) The Program 
for Teachers of Business and Distributive Education. 




These curriculums also become the bases for advanced 



study. 



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The Division of Education at Savannah State College is organized around the concept which conceives that teaching is a 
distinctive and definitive profession. In common with the other great professions of our culture, teaching, to be worthy, 
involves acquisition bv the practitioner of fine, highly developed sensitivities and specialized knowledges and competencies. 
Such an individual must also possess a genuine, practical philosophical and psychological approach to learning within the 
framework of the culture in which the educational program exists. 

The Division provides programs for preparation of teachers, within the frame of reference described above, in the follow- 
ing areas: 



(1) Elementary Education 

(2) English 

(3) General Science 

(4) Industrial Education 



(5) Mathematics 

(6) Music Education 

(7) Social Studies and 

(8) Health, Physical Education and Becreation 



The Division maintains constant contact with the Division of Certification of the State Department of Education and 
makes every effort to be assured that successful completion of any of the programs by a student is tantamount to satisfaction 
of certification requirements. 

The Division of Education serves three major purposes. (1) In cooperation with the College-wide Teacher Education 
Committee and the State Committee on Cooperation in Teacher Education, it spearheads the process of continuous planning, 
experimentation, and evaluation of the total teacher training program. (2) It assunres chief responsibility in the selection, 
guidance, and training of students for the work of teaching in the elementary and secondary schools — mainly in the schools 
of Georgia. (3) For persons who plan to become principals and supervisors, it provides an adequate foundation for advanced 
study on the graduate level. 

COLLEGE-WIDE PROVISION FOR TEACHER EDUCATION 

This division comprises three department: the Department of Elementarv Education; the Department of Health, Phy- 
sical Education, and Becreation; the Department of Secondary Education. The preparation of teachers is, however, a 
college-wide commitment. Because every division and department at the college is involved in training teachers in some 
subject matter field, this function engages the constant interest and efforts, staff resources, and facilities of the entire insti- 
tution. 



Page 5 



DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, 
AND RECREATION 



The essential aim of the Department of Health, 
Physical Education and Recreation is to afford 
professional training for pre-service and in-service 
teachers of health, physical education, and recrea- 
tion in the elementary and secondary schools. A 
parallel aim is advisement. The department en- 
courages only potentially qualified students to 
undertake professional training in this field. A 
third aim is to provide for all students instruction 
in the basic principles of health and recreational 
activity needed for wholesome living. 

In pursuance of the foregoing aims this depart- 
ment provides a four-fold program of instruction. 
For students who plan to become professional 
workers in the field of health, physical education, 
and recreation — either in schools or in other agen- 
cies — the department offers a sequence of special- 
ized training leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Education, with a concentration in 
health, physical education, and recreation. 

In addition, for all students enrolled in teacher 
education curricula at Savannah State College, this 
department provides basic training in supervision 
of one or more phases of a comprehensive health, 
physical education, and recreation program in the 
schools of Georgia. This phase of the work is pro- 
vided either in selected specialized courses or in a 
minor sequence. Further, for all students enrolled 
at the college this department provides instruction 
in the fundamental concepts and activities of 
health, physical education, and recreation as an 
essential phase of general education. 

Finally, this department serves the college com- 
munity through instruction and leadership in the 
intramural program. The intramural program is, 
in effect, a laboratory in which students enjoy 
practicing the skills learneo in general service 
courses and relish competing with their peers. 
Page 6 





DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 

The Division of Humanities, as its name implies, is concerned primarily with transforming the individual into a human 
and humane person. The technique for realizing this aim is that of serious study of the human heritage as it has been 
recorded in literature, music, art, and philosophy. In this manner the student deepens his appreciation, sharpens his intellect, 
enhances his critical powers, and incorporates himself in the mainstream of the best that has been thought and felt. 

The Division of Humanities provides opportunities for majoring in English and music and minoring in the fine arts and 
French and Spanish. The Curricula in these areas are designed also to prepare teachers. Thus students who elect to teach 
become purveyors of the humanistic tradition. The College provides a means also for meeting the national need for persons 
trained in foreign languages. As future linguists and/or teachers, students have an unusual opportunity at Savannah State 
College. A strong faculty in modern languages in addition to a recently installed laboratory assures the students the means 
of thoroughly preparing themselves in this area. 

The various musical organizations — band, chorus, men and women's glee clubs — furnish possibilities for student par- 
ticipation. 





DEPARTMENT OF FINE ARTS 

MUSIC 

In the area of Music, the Department of Fine Arts at Savannah State College offers a major program leading to the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Music Education and two minor programs — one for prospective teachers in the secondary 
schools and a non-teaching program. All of the curricula have been approved by the three national accrediting agencies — 
The Music Teachers National Association, the National Association of Schools of Music and the Music Educators National 
Conference, as well as by the State Board of Certification and the Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia. 

Courses include intensive work in Theory, History and Literature, Performance, Applied Music, Conducting and Music 
Education. Although 75 hours are required for state certification, a total of 87 hours constitutes the four-year Music require- 
ment at the College. Previous training of at least two years in any applied area is required of all prospective majors, but 
skilled aptitude is recognized and accepted in lieu of this requirement if necessary. All majors must pursue four years of 
training in piano, voice, or another instrument as well as the same amount of time in their applied major area. In addition 
to the music courses, all candidates for a degree take a large complement of courses in General Education and the Professional 
Sequences. The total requirement for graduation is 195 quarter hours, usually completed in 12 regular quarters. 

The five musical organizations — The Marching Band, The Concert Band, The Choral Society, The Women's Glee Club 
and the Men's Glee Club — are each directed by a full time faculty member and provide ample opportunity for students inside 
and outside of the Department to receive experiences in public performance which range from programs on the campus at 
Assemblies, Church Services, Vespers, and Special Programs, to local television appearances, concerts in the community, 
athletic games av.ay from home, and concert tours throughout the state and the eastern section of the country. Each organi- 
zation, furthermore, contains student conductors and accompanists who are selected for their special skills in each area, 
providing additional opportunities for specialized training. Participation is required for four years by music majors and for 
two years by music minors, although the latter are encouraged to remain for the additional two years in their selected 
organization. 

One of the most important operations in this Department is the awarding each year of a number of Scholarships, called 
Grants-In-Aid, which are given to capable, worthy applicants in all organizations upon recommendation of the Department. 
These awards are sufficient at times, depending upon the aptitude, academic standing, and financial need of the student, to 
provide tuition for a full year in addition to other expenses. Grants are made, however, only to applicants who file the 
necessary forms, are recommended by the Department, and are approved by the Committee on Scholarships. Recipients, 
encouraged to apply in the spring, are usually notified during the summer, well in advance of the opening of the Fall 
Quarter. 

As for musical facilities, the Department occupies three buildings throughout the campus, and because of the increasing 
enrollment of music majors, these buildings are fully utilized for classes, organizational rehearsals, practice periods, and office 
space. Pianos are provided for practice and rooms are available for other instrumental and voice practice without charge. 
All instruments in the Department are tuned regularly and kept in general repair. Band instruments are provided without 
charge to all Band students who need them, and complete uniforms, robes, stoles, blazers, and concert dresses are available 
to members of the various organizations. 

For any additional information concerning the music area of the Department of Fine Arts, please feel free to address 
your inquiries to Dr. Coleridge A. Braithwaite, Chairman, Department of Fine Arts, Savannah State College. 

Page 7 



DEPARTMENT OF FINE ARTS 

ART 

In the area of Art, the Department of Fine Arts at 
Savannah Slate College is interested in discovering and 
developing new talent. The nation as a whole is deeply 
concerned with the position of the arts and the total 
humanities program as it relates to technological and 
scientific advances of this era. The forboding question 
of many of our great educators seems to be: Should our 
efforts to advance, science, technology and mechanization 
become so intensified and glamorized that our develop- 
ment and refinement of human dignity and individual 
uniqueness, which indeed are almost entirely perpetual 
in the humanities, become so dilute from lack of atten- 
tion that the generations to come will have little or no 
desire to be biological entities with spirit and inspiration 
to be free? 

It is the intention of the art program at Savannah 
State College to contribute to the whole of our society 
by developing persons with innate talent and strong 
patterns of individuality. It will be the individual thinker 
and doer of the next generation who will have the 
courage to oppose any dangerous trend which would 
tend to over-mechanize our souls and our societv. 

The art program at Savannah State College has 
developed a program in Art leading to a Bachelor of 
Science in Art Education which may very well aid in 
the national effort to thwart inadvertent trends toward 
a robot social order. 

For any additional information concerning the art 
area of the Department of Fine Arts, please feel free to 
address your inquiries to 

Mr. Phillip J. Hampton 
Director of Art 
Department of Fine Arts 
Savannah State College 
Savannah, Georgia 

DEPARTMENT OF MODERN 
LANGUAGES 

Outside of the field of education, a person with a 
major in a foreign language can find employment in 
several areas. First, there is the area of organizations 
of a more or less international character. Because of 
the nature of its work, there is almost a constant 
demand at the United Nations Headquarters for men 
and Avomen who are proficient in foreign languages. 

At present stage in its development, the Department 
of Modern Languages has two main purposes. It pro- 
vides instruction in French, German, and Spanish as 
essential to a phase of the general curriculum; and it 
offers work especially designed to meet the needs of 
in-service and prospective language teachers. 

Objectives of the work in languages are: (1) to help 
students acquire reasonable proficiency in the mechanics 
of writing and speaking the language; (2) to enable 
students to read the language with normal ccompre- 
hension and ease; (3) to foster appreciation of selected 
literary appreciation of selected masterworks; (4) to 
enlarge cultural horizons and nurture respect for foreign 
peoples and cultures. 






Page 8 



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1 f 1 VI 




The Division of Natural Sciences is one of the major areas of instruction at Savannah State College. This division is 
staffed by well qualified personnel as a whole, people who have had long experience in the teaching profession, and graduates 
of some of the best universities in this country. All of the staff members are very well acquainted with the problems of our 
present-day youth. 

Savannah State College, through its Division of Natural Sciences, is ready to continue helping voung people to prepare 
themselves for living. Some or the offerings are 1.) PREMEDICAL WORK. In this age when health is being given priority 
in our thinking, the need for well trained doctors of medicine cannot be over stressed. WE NEED TRAINED DOCTORS TO- 
DAY. We also need other health personnel; dentists, nurses, pharmacists, etc. 2.) WE NEED TRAINED CHEMISTS. We 
need the trained chemists to help us live better; develop new products for human consumption; work in our defense plants, 
and in many other ways. 3.) WE NEED TRAINED BIOLOGISTS. We need the trained biologists to help others to under- 
stand the living organisms within our environment; for research work in medicine, dentistry, and other areas including 
health. 4.) WE NEED TRAINED MATHEMATICIANS AND PHYSICISTS. The Spage Age, the launching of satellites, 
preparation of machines for defense purposes, are only a few reasons why we need men well prepared in mathematics and 
physics. 

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The Division of Social Sciences offers two major programs for persons interested in the social sciences. Curriculum I 
leads to the B.S. degree in the social sciences with a concentration in history. Curriculum II leads to the B.S. degree in the 
social sciences with a concentration in Sociology leading to the professional study of social work. 

Persons who plan to teach social studies in the secondary school should enroll in the Teacher Education Program and 
pursue the B.S. degree in Education with a concentration in the social sciences. 

Curriculum I is designed for persons interested in careers in: law, government, diplomatic service, general research, 
Young Men's Christian Association, and Urban League work. 

Curriculum II is designed for persons interested in careers as: social workers, probation officers, vocational counselors, 
camp counselors, employment interviewers, juvenile court workers, welfare fund workers, and immigration service workers. 

Page 9 



The Division of Technical Sciences encompasses instructional programs in engineering technology, home economics, 
and industrial teacher education which are organized in two departments; namely, the Department of Engineering Technology 
and the Department of Home Economics. These departments afford opportunities for students to pursue curricula leading to 
the degree of Bachelor of Science with majors in Foods and Nutrition and Institutional Management, Textiles and Clothing, 
Building Construction Technology, Electronics Technology, Mechanical Technology. Industrial Arts Education; Trade and 
Industrial Education. The latter two teacher education programs are offered in cooperation with the Division of Education. 

A major portion of the offerings of the Division of Technical Sciences is designed to prepare persons for immediate 
employment in the industrial world as professional and semi-professional workers in technical home economics and engineer- 
ing technology. Those individuals interested in careers in these areas should he well grounded in the applied sciences. Such 
high school subjects as physics, algebra, plane geometry, trigonometry and industrial shop are very desirable for persons 
planning to pursue engineering technology curricula, and chemistry is essential for those interested in technical home 
economics. 

The Division of Technical Sciences offers the required shop work and special subject preparation for students who plan 
to teach industrial arts education, or trade and industrial education. The industrial arts education program does not attempt 
to prepare persons for successful employment in industry as skilled or semi-skilled workers, but provides a variety of industrial 
shop activities augmented by appropriate general and professional education courses leading to competence in industrial 
arts teaching at the secondary level. The trade and industrial education program is designed for those persons wishing to 
teach trade and industrial subjects on a vocational basis in the secondary schools. In order to pursue this program success- 
fully, one must have alreadv learned a trade and worked in industry for two years as a journeyman at the trade he wishes 
to teach. 

Engineering technology is an area of knowledge embracing those phases of physical sciences, mathematics, and the prac- 
tices of modern industry which are utilized in the design and manufacture of the machines, structures, power sources, com- 
munication systems, and materials needed to maintain a highly civilized society. The activities of engineering technology 
are concerned with translating the concepts and theories of professional engineers and scientists into actual devices and 
products by using laboratory tests to provide data for rational designs. These tests are followed by interpretations of data 
and the preparation of working drawings for the use of the skilled craftsmen that produce the devices and products. 

The Department of Engineering Technology offers curricula leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science, with majors 
in building construction, electronics, and mechanical technology. 

The curriculum in building construction technology is designed to provide ample instruction in those areas of knowledge 
required for successful performance in these capacities: (1) Architectural and Structural Draftsman and Designer, (2) 
Construction Surveyor, (3) Estimator, (4) Materials Tester. 

The electronics technology curriculum provides instruction in the fundamentals of vacuum tube and semiconductor of 
circuit theory with emphasis on the applications of theoretical principles to actual electronics devices. Graduates of the 
electronics technology sequence are prepared to function in these positions: (1) Electronics Draftsman, (2) Research Analyst, 
(3) Communications Technician. 

The mechanical technology curriculum provides an opportunity for a student to receive comprehensive engineering expe- 
rience which will enable him to design machinery and to prepare working drawings of the same for industry. A graduate 
of the mechanical technology program is qualified to assume the responsibilities of these positions: (1) Machine Designer, 
(2) Mechanical Draftsman, (3) Automotive Technician. 

The home economics program is directed toward two major objectives. The first of these is to enhance the general 
education of the student through a core curriculum for common learning. The core curriculum has three aims: (1) develop- 
ment of the student as a person, (2) preparation for family life, and (3) preparation for the responsibilities of citizenship 
in its broadest sense. The second major objective is preparation of the student to enter and advance with assurance and 
competence in one of the various professions in home economics. 




Page 10 



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In addition to instruction on the campus, Savannah State College is authorized to operate the following 
programs: 

1. College correspondence study 

2. Supervised high school study 

3. Extension classes 

4. Informal adult programs 

Such programs have become recognized services of public education, reflecting a sense of obligation to those 
who cannot undertake residence instruction and to those who do not require residence instruction for personal 
growth and enrichment. 

Extension classes and adult programs are provided upon sufficient demand. 

Information concerning credit, fees, examinations, textbooks, etc., may be obtained from 

The Division of Home Study 

Savannah State College 
Savannah, Georgia 




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Page 11 



Savannah State College puts great emphasis upon a 
rich and varied religious life program. Through its 
religious activities, the college seeks to develop an under- 
standing of and an appreciation for the place of religion 
in everyday living, to deepen spiritual insight, and to 
make the practice of Christian principle a vital part of 
the life of the well educated citizen. 

Religious life activities are directed by the College 
Minister. The Sunday School, YMCA and YWCA. the 
Newman Club, and the annual Religious Emphasis Week 
provide opportunities for religious growth and develop- 
ment under the supervision of the Religious Life Com- 
mittee. 

Savannah State College contributes to the attainment 
of a well-rounded education by providing many oppor- 
tunities for students to participate in a wide range of 
significant activities. Through the efforts of organized 
groups, programs are planned for the social, religious, 
and cultural advancement of the college community. 

The Student Council, composed of representatives 
of all classes, works with the administration in the gov- 
ernment of the college. It works also with the various 
campus organizations and sponsors projects for the 
general welfare of the student body. 

The choir, band, men's glee club, and women's glee 
club, are open for membership to all students interested 
in music. These groups perform not only locally, but 
are in constant demand for special programs throughout 
the state. 

The Tiger's Roar, official student newspaper, is pub- 
lished every six weeks by students under supervision of 
the Public Relations Office as well as the annual. 

The following organizations also provide media for 
expression of student interests: Art Club, Business Club, 
Camera Club, Collegiate Counselors. Creative Dance 
Group, Debating Club, Dormitory Councils, Economics 
Club, Newman Club, Savannah State College Players 
Guild, Social Science Club, Student Loan Association, 
Tiger's Roar, Trade Association, Usher's Club, Varsity 
Club, Future Teachers of America ( NEA ) , Home Eco- 
nomics Club, Veterans Club, YMCA, YWCA, and the 
Women's Council. 

The following national social fraternities are organ- 
ized on the campus: Alpha Phi Alpha, Omega Psi Phi, 
Phi Beta Sigma, and Kappa Alpha Psi. 

The following national social sororities are organ- 
ized on the campus: Alpha Kappa Alpha, Sigma Gamma 
Rho, Zeta Phi Beta, and Delta Sigma Theta. 

The national honor societies, Alpha Kappa Mu and 
Beta Kappa Chi have chapters on the campus. 

The Department of Health and Physical Education 
conducts a well-rounded intramural athletic program of 
seasonal activities for men and for women. Utilizing 
group games and various sports for their full educational 
and health values, the program features football, basket- 
ball, track and field, tennis, boxing, golf, baseball, soft- 
ball, volleyball, field hockey, and badminton. 

A member of the Southeastern Athletic Conference, 
Savannah State College maintains competition in all 
sports sponsored by the conference. 

Savannah State College also holds membership in 
two national athletic associations, NCAA and NAIA. 

To complement formal education on the campus, the 
college provides many activities for cultural enrichment. 
Student assemblies, institutes, motion pictures, lectures, 
art exhibitions, dramatics, forums, athletic contests, 
hobby groups, and tours contribute to the general wel- 
fare of the community. 

Page 12 












Persons who are at least fifteen years of age and who present evidence of good moral character, adequate ability, sound health, and interest 
in a specific course of study are eligible to apply for admission to the several departments of the college. 

FORAAAL APPLICATION REQUIRED 

Each candidate for admission is required to make formal appplication and thereafter submit such credentials as may be needed to support 
the application. Admissions correspondence should be addressed to the 

Director of Admissions 
Savannah State College 
State College Branch 
Savannah, Georgia 

Transcripts and recommendations should be mailed directly from the applicant's former school to the Director of Admissions. The 
application form with instructions may be obtained by writing the Director of Admissions. Inquiries should be made immediately. 

ESTIMATED GENERAL EXPENSES 

For One Academic Year of Three Quarters 

NOTE: Fees remitted by mail should be sent by money order, cashiers check or certified check payable to SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE. 

*Per Quarter *Per Year 

Matriculation Fee $ 60.00 $180.00 

Health Fee 3.00 9.00 

Student Activity Fee 10.00 30.00 

Student Group Insurance 5.00 15.00 

Total Charges — Day Student $ 78.00 .$234.00 

Room, Board and Laundry 187.00 561.00 

Total Charges — Boarding Students * $265.00 * $795.00 

*Freshmen and Entering Students pay an additional $10.00 General Deposit required of all students upon initial registration in any unit of 
the University System. In keeping with the vote of the student body on May, 1962, each student will be assessed a $6.00 Yearbook Fee due and 
payable at Fall Quarter Registration or the student's initial registration. Please refer to the current college catalogue for a complete schedule of fees. 

The above table includes basic fees only. Other charges are assessed where applicable. All charges are subject to change at the end of 
each quarter. 

Normal cost of books and supplies approximate $30.00 per. quarter. Students are required to secure all books, supplies and tools necessary 
for satisfactory completion of courses for which they are enrolled. 

All fees are due and payable at the time of registration. Students are required to meet their financial obligations promptly as condition of 
their remaining in college. Students granted scholarships or work-aid will be notified in writing and credit will be made to their accounts accordingly. 

Veterans coming to Savannah State College should bring with them sufficient funds to pay all fees as indicated on the Schedule of Fees. 

SELF HELP OPPORTUNITIES 

Worthy and industrious students may help to meet college expenses through part-time employment, provided they maintain satisfactory 
scholastic averages. These work opportunities include such jobs as clerical and stenographic work, library work, waiting tables, washing dishes, 
pantry and kitchen work, skilled and unskilled work in the several trades and in maintenance. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

A limited number of special scholarships are available to selected students who meet the required standards of scholastic merit, high 
character, general promise, and superior achievement in certain specific areas of the college program. 

The aim of the National Defense Student Loan Program is to create at American Colleges and Universities loan funds from which needy 
students may borrow to complete their higher education. Students interested in National Defense Loan Funds, should write Chairman of Student 
Personnel Services, Savannah State College, Savannah, Georgia. 




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CV 



THE BULLETIN 

Savannah State College 
savannah, georgia 

Alumni Issue 



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THE BULLETIN 

Vol. 15 JUNE, 1962 No. 7 

Dr. W. K. Payne President 

Prince Jackson. Jr., '49 Editor 

Wilton C. Scott Adviser 

Lillie Allen Powell, '58 Associate Editor 

Rosemary Singleton, '61 Associate Editor 

Directory of Savannah State 
National Alimmi Officers 

W. H. McBride. '49. President, 284 Plaza, Athens. Georgia 

Mrs. Josie B. Sessoms, '36, Vice President. Tattnall County High and Industrial 

School, Reidsville, Georgia 
Mrs. Marie B. Martin, '46, Recording Secretary, William James High School, 

Statesboro, Georgia 
Mrs. Ester S. Bryant, '59, Corresponding Secretary, 1017 West 37th Street, 

Savannah, Georgia 

Prince Mitchell, '57. Treasurer, Savannah State College, Savannah, Georgia 
Prince Jackson. Jr.. '49. Reporter. Savannah State College. Savannah. Georgia 
Rev. J. E. Bailey, '17, Chaplain. 604 Waters Avenue, Savannah, Georgia 

Directory of Alumni Chapters 

Albany, Georgia Mr. Benjamin Graham '55 Albany State College 

Athens, Georgia Mr. Willie H. McBride '49. 248 Plaza 

Atlanta, Georgia Mr. Arthur Richardson '40 Samuel Archer High 

Augusta, Georgia Miss Ethel Mack 1211 Tenth Street 

Claxton, Georgia Mr. Charles L. Bailey '53 7 Long Street 

Columbus, Georgia Mr. Charles DuVaul "26 Spencer High School 

Dublin, Georgia Mr. Timothy Ryals '54 Oconee High School 



Griffin, Georgia 



Mr. L. L. Banks '43 502 North Sixth Street 



Homerville, Georgia . Mr. E. T. Whitaker '37 Homerville High and Elementary 

Jesup, Georgia Mr. Arthur Williams '49 Wayne County Training School 

Macon, Georgia Mr. W. J. Sutton '48 1601 Anthony Road 

Madison, Georgia Mr. Robert Jackson '55 Pearl Street High School 

Mcintosh. Georgia Mr. Jesse Stevens Hineshaw Elementary School 

Reidsville, Georgia. . Mrs. Josie Sessoms '36 Reidsville. Georgia 

Sandersville, Georgia Elnus Williams Davisboro Academy 

Savannah, Georgia Mr. James Luten '38 Sophronia Tompkins High 

Statesboro, Georgia Mrs. Etheleen Talbert '48 2 Carver Street 

Valdosta, Georgia . . . . Mr. Isaiah Isom '58 Pinevale High School 

Washington, D. C Mrs. Ora M. Washington 3719 Kansas Avenue, N. W. 

Waynesboro, Georgia Mr. R. E. Blakeney '31 Waynesboro High and Industrial 



Notes from the Editor's Desk 

THE GRIFFIN-McDONOUGH STORY 



About three weeks ago, I attended the 
last meeting of the Griffin-McDonough 
Chapter. All thirteen members were 
present and much to my great delight 
and surprise, this small Chapter was 
doing far more than anyone could ever 
expect. In addition to providing two 
scholarships for worthy high school 

Page 2 



graduates in Griffin and McDonough, 
they were 100% in their dues and schol- 
arship obligations to the College. The 
fellowship at the meeting was great and 
old "SSC Spirit" was present. 

As I drove back to the College, I 
thought of all of the possible Griffin- 
McDonough situations that could be, if 



other graduates had this "SSC Spirit." 
There are countless cities in Georgia 
alone where droves of our graduates are 
working, yet, year after year, the Col- 
lege receives no support, financially or 
otherwise from these graduates. Many 
of us talk about how much we love and 
owe the College but never try to show 
our love and indebtedness in any man- 
ner other than lip-service. Yet, if only 
a few of us unite ourselves, our Alma 
Mater would be able to ascend to heights 
beyond our wildest dreams. 

Instead of rendering lip-service, let us 
all catch the "spirit" of the Griffin- 
McDonough Story. If this storv is the 
story of your city, then Savannah State 
College is proud of vou. 

ABOUT OUR COVER — Spearheading 
the current gigantic special scholarship 
drive of the Savannah Chapter of the 
Savannah State College National Alumni 
Association are Mrs. Lillian W. Wright, 
"60." James V. Nevels, "60," and Daniel 
Washington "60." 

These three are typical of the recent 
surge of young graduates who decided 
to pitch in their time and talents with 
the older graduates and work hard for 
a greater Savannah State College. As a 
result of this surge, the leadership in 
the Alumni has a youthful look, not only 
on the various local levels but through- 
out. 

Some of these key youthful leaders 
are Willie H. McBride, National Alumni 
President; Prince Mitchell, National 
Alumni Treasurer; Isaiah Isom, Presi- 
dent of the Valdosta Chapter; L. L. 
Banks. President of the Griffin- 
McDonough Chapter; Timothy Ryals, 
President of the Dublin Chapter; Wil- 
liam N. Weston, Jaunita Florence, Ray- 
mond Knight, James 0. Thomas, and 
Ellis Trappio of the Washington, D. C. 
Chapter; Ethel Mack, Prince Wynn, 
Dorothy Moore, and Jacob Williams of 
the Augusta Chapter; and Emmet Den- 
erson of the Macon Chapter. 

In Savannah there are now about ten 
of these recent graduates who are work- 
ing so hard until the reliable leadership 
that has held our larger Chapter to- 
gether for many years now are confident 
that these "kids" can take care of 
things. 

Perhaps this "new look" will attract 
the hundreds of young grads who have 
never taken the initiative to do anything 
since leaving the College. 

SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 




Faculty and Staff 



Honor Dr. W. K. Payne at Savannah State 



The Savannah State College faculty and 
staff presented Dr. W. K. Payne, President 
of the College, with a beautiful silver plated 
punch bowl with the inscription, "Presented 
to Dr. W. K. Payne, President of Savannah 
State College, Savannah, Georgia, by the Col- 
lege Family, in recognition of his dedication 
and service to the College from 1937-1962. 
Presented May 24, 1962." 

The presentation was made at a Testimonial 
Dinner given in Dr. Payne's honor for his 
meritoriously devoted service in education to 
Savannah State College for 25 years. The 
affair was sponsored by the faculty and staff 
at the College. Also in honor of the Presi- 
dent, books will be ordered for the College 
Library to be donated in Dr. Payne's name 
and they will be of his own choice. 

Serving as Toastmaster at the Dinner, Dr. 
B. T. Griffith, Professor and Head of the 
Department of Biology at Savannah State, read 
to the guests greetings sent to Dr. Payne 
commemorating and congratulating him for 
his service to SSC by his many relatives, 
friends, and professional colleagues. 

Among the greetings read were the follow- 
ing: From the Office of the Chancellor, "The 
members of the Board of Regents Office join 
with the faculty, the alumni, and friends of 
the Savannah State College in paying tribute 
to President William K. Payne on the occa- 
sion of the twenty-fifth anniversary of his 
becoming a member of the faculty of the 
College. 

SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 



"As Dean and as President of the Savannah 
State College for many years, President Payne 
has provided outstanding leadership for the 
College. In all of his dealings with faculty 
members and alumni he has been wise, con- 
siderate and cooperative and he has gained 
wonderful support for the institution. The 
Savannah State College has made splendid 
progress under the guidance of President 
Payne and there is reason to believe that this 
progress will continue in the years ahead. 
President Payne richly deserves the honors 
that are being bestowed upon him." 

From the Southern Association of Colleges 
and Secondary Schools, Executive Secretary 
Gordon W. Sweet writes, "Upon the occasion 
of your being honored by your faculty, staff 
and alumni, we wish to send sincere congratu- 
lations ... of your distinguished leadership 
and your striving for high standards . . ." 

Fiom the National Education Association 
comes, ". . . know of no calling in which a 
man can render greater service to his fellow- 
men than in the field of education, with its 
rich opportunities to guide and teach the fu- 
ture citizens and leaders . . ." 

American Teachers Association's Executive 
Secretary George W. Jones stipulates, . . . "Be- 
cause of your dedication to the principle of a 
good education as the foundation stone of 
democracy and the touchstone of freedom, 
countless youth have gone forth to establish for 
themselves a reputable place in society. Because 
of your concern for their welfare, your dili- 
gence in safeguarding their right to learn, and 



your persistence in their pursuit of excellence, 
graduates of Savannah State College are now 
respected leaders of their respective communi- 
ties . . ." 

Mayor of Savannah, Malcolm Maclean, com- 
mented, "I would like to take this opportunity 
to extend greetings and express the gratitude 
of the citizens of Savannah to President Wil- 
liam K. Payne on the completion of 25 years 
of faithful and loyal service to the Savannah 
State College. His achievements during this 
period have made history in the annals of his 
school . . ." 

William F. Lynes, Chairman, Commissioners 
of Chatham County and Ex-Officio Judges 
Thereof, remarks, "Both, personally, and in 
behalf of the Commissioners of Chatham 
County and Ex-Officio Judges Thereof, it is 
a great pleasure for me to extend congratula- 
tions to Dr. William K. Payne, President of 
Savannah State College, on his completion of 
twenty-five years of service . . . Chatham 
County commends President Payne for his 
outstanding service, and extends his every 
wish for continued success, health, and happi- 
ness in the future." 

Others sending greetings were: Claude Pur- 
cell, State Superintendent of Schools; Dr. 
William H. Dennis, Jr., President, Albany 
State College; A. 0. Duer, Executive Secre- 
tary, National Association of Intercollegiate 
Athletics; and Dr. C. V. Troup, President, 
The Fort Valley State College. Also sending 
greetings were members of his immediate 
family. 

Telegrams of congratulations arrived from 
Dr. James A. Colston, President of Knoxville 
College and former President of Savannah 
State College, and Ralph McGill, Editor of 
the Atlanta Constitution. 

Those appearing on the program were: Mrs. 
Louise L. Owens, Assistant Professor of Lan- 
guages and Literature; Dr. Joan Gordon, Pro- 
fessor of Sociology; W. V. Winters, Professor 
of Physical Sciences; and Dr. C. A. Braith- 
waite, Chairman of the Department of Fine 
Arts. All are members of the Savannah State 
College Faculty. 



Pictured below is James J. DeVoe, President 
of the Student Council, presenting Dr. W . K. 
Payne a silver loving cup with the inscription 
"Dedicated to William Kenneth Payne on his 
25th Anniversary at Savannah State College, 
May 24, 1962, SSC Student Body." 

In presenting this cup to President Payne, 
Mr. DeVoe indicated that his (Payne's) wise 
counsel and gentle guidance will live with 
many oj us long after we have left. 




Page 3 



FACULTY MEMBERS WHO HAVE RENDERED TWENTY-FIVE OR 
MORE YEARS OF SERVICE AT SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 




/ 



jf 



MISS LUELLA HAWKINS, joining 
the Savannah State College staff in 
1934, is now Associate Professor and 
Reference Librarian. 




MR. WILLIAM B. NELSON, Profes- 
sor of Industrial Education, having 
spent seventeen years at Savannah State 
College, will retire in June. 




MRS. VARNETTA K. FRAZIER, 

College Dietician, came to Savannah 
State College in 1930. 

Page 4 





Presently employed as secretary and 
Assistant to the Co-ordinator of Gen- 
eral Education, MRS. JOSEPHINE F. 
HUBERT has been with the College 
since 1932. 



DR. JOAN L. GORDON was a li- 
brarian when she joined the staff in 
1929. She is now serving as Professor 
of Social Sciences. 



:'* 



\ 








J 



MR. LEROY BROWN joined the Sa- 
vannah State College faculty in 1928. 
He is now Assistant Professor of Auto 
Technology. 



Coming to Savannah State College in 
1932, MR. C. VERNON CLAY is Asso- 
ciate Professor of Chemistry. 




MR. W. VERGIL WINTERS, Profes- 
sor of Physical Sciences, has been a 
member of the Savannah State College 
faculty since 1927. 



Support the 

Alumni Association 

with your 

Time and Money 

SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



Alumni Secretary Receives National 
Science Foundation Fellowship 



Prince Jackson, Jr., College Alumni Secre- 
tary, has been selected by Harvard University 
to study as a National Science Foundation 
Fellow during the academic year, 1962-63. He 
has also been selected for the second consecu- 
tive year as a National Science Foundation 
Fellow to study this summer at the University 
of Kansas. 




Mr. Jackson received the M.S. degree from 
New York University Graduate School of Arts 
and Science in 1950. He has done study 
toward the Ph.D. degree in mathematics sev- 
eral summers at New York University. 



Among the positions held by Mr. Jackson 
are: assistant principal, William James High 
School, Slatesboro, Georgia; adviser to stu- 
dent newspaper and yearbook, William James 
High School; president of the Alumni Asso- 
ciation, Statesboro, Georgia. He is a veteran 
of World War II and a veteran of six years, 
post-World War II. 

Currently, Mr. Jackson is an Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Mathematics and Physics; College 
Alumni Secretary; Yearbook adviser, Savan- 
nah State College; Sustaining member of the 
West Broad Street YMCA; Sustaining mem- 
ber of the Boy Scouts of America; member of 
the Georgia Teachers and Education Associa- 
tion; member of Savannah State College Ath- 
letic Committee; Faculty adviser to Delta Eta 
Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. 

As an officer of Administration at the Col- 
lege, he serves as a member of the Adminis- 
trative Council. 

In 1959, Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity 
awarded him a plaque for outstanding services 
tendered. In 1961, he was named "Alpha Man 
of the Year" by the Alpha Phi Alpha Fra- 
ternity. 

In 1961 he was selected as a National Sci- 
ence Foundation Fellow to attend the Uni- 
versity of Kansas during the summer. 

Mr. Jackson also serves as Athletic Director 
at St. Pius X High School in Savannah, Geor- 
gia. He is First Vice President of the St. 
Benedict's Catholic Church Holy Name So- 
ciety. He is married and is the father of 
two sons. 



Washington Elected President of Savannah 
Chapter, Alumni Association, 1962-63 



In an unprecedented move, the Savannah 
Chapter of the Savannah State College Na- 
tional Alumni Association elected young dy- 
namic Daniel Washington as its president for 




the 1962-63 school year. Mr. Washington suc- 
ceeded Mr. James E. Luten, Principal of 
Tompkins High School who served as Presi- 
dent of the Chapter since 1960. 

Mr. Norman B. Elmore, Principal of Flor- 
ence Street School, installed Mr. Washington 
and the other officers at the May 27th meet- 
ing. The other elected officers are: Mr. Na- 
thaniel Thomas, Vice President; Miss Ruby 
King, Recording Secretary; Mr. Prince Mitch- 
ell, Corresponding Secretary; Mrs. Leanna 
Wilcox, Financial Secretary; Miss Lula Smith, 
Treasurer; Mr. Clarence Lofton, Chaplain; 
and Mrs. Lillian Wright, Reporter. 

The newly elected President is a dynamic 
and versatile young personality. Since his 
graduation from Savannah State, he has been 
unremittingly and assiduously active in com- 
munity, religious and fraternal affairs through- 
out the city. His diligence and natural lead- 
ership abilities were speedily recognized, ac- 
knowledged and utilized by the local Alumni 
Chapter. His work on several committees es- 
tablished him as presidential material. 

After receiving his baccalaureate degree, he 
accepted a position at Candler County Train- 
ing School, Metter, Georgia, as Chairman of 
the Department of English and Business. 
During his one year tenure in Metter, he 
served as Dramatics Director, Adviser of the 



Senior Class, Chairman of the Homecoming 
Committee and Yearbook Adviser. His resig- 
nation at Candler County Training School was 
accepted with great regret. 

He began teaching in Chatham County as 
a seventh grade teacher at Tompkins Elemen- 
tary School in 1959, and served as one of the 
advisers of the student newspaper. In 1960, 
he was transferred to the John W. Hubert 
Elementary School as a seventh grade teacher 
and served as a member of the In-service 
Committee, and adviser of the Safety Patrols. 

He holds membership in the Chatham 
County Teachers Association, American Teach- 
ers Association, Georgia Teachers and Educa- 
tion Association, National Education Associa- 
tion, National Council of Teachers of English, 
West Broad Street YMCA Players, Jaquar 
Social and Civic Club, and Beta Phi Lambda 
Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. 
He is Chairman of the Publicity Committee 
of the Jaguar Social and Civic Club and Edi- 
tor of the Sphinx of the Alpha Phi Alpha 
Fraternity, Inc. 

Mr. Washington is an active member of the 
First Bryan Baptist Church, Savannah, 
Georgia. 

Since his graduation from Savannah State 
in 1959, he has done advanced study toward 
the Master of Arts degree at New York Uni- 
versity during the summer of 1961. 



Clifford E. Hardwick, III 
To Deliver Main Address 
At Alumni Banquet 

Prince Jackson, Jr., College Alumni Secre- 
tary, recently announced that young, brilliant 
Clifford E. Hardwick, III, will be the main 
speaker at the Alumni Banquet on June 2, 
1962. Mr. Hardwick is well known among 
alumni of the College and has been praised 
extensively for his oratorical ability. 




He was recently accorded the distinction of 
being named the first secondary supervisor for 
Negro Schools in Savannah. The appointment 
was announced in the Fall and Mr. Hardwick 
assumed his new duties immediately. In addi- 
tion to his regular duties, he gives special 
attention to the science field, with a view 



(Continued on Page 6) 



SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 



Page 5 



Monn t Zion Baptist Church 



Grifiiii-McDonoiigh Chapter Sponsors Concert 



The Savannah State College Choral 
Society, under the direction of Dr. 
Coleridge A. Braithwaite, was presented 
in concert at the Mount Zion Baptist 
Church in Griffin. Georgia on March 
30. 1962. Proceeds from this activity 
have been applied to the scholarship 
fund. 

Mr. Lewis L. Banks, president of the 
chapter, reports that this program was 
a success. "This is the first affair that 
we have sponsored to further the cul- 
tural development of our community," 
he said. 

The success and appreciation of this 
program was evidenced by the applause 
from the large audience after each 
rendition. Glowing statements of praise 
are still being repeated by many citi- 
zens of our area. 

The conduct of the members of the 
Choral Society was beyond reproach. 
The way each number was presented 
by Dr. Braithwaite was a source of 
information that was enlightening to 
all and made the program more mean- 
ingful. 

This chapter, first known as the Grif- 
fin Chapter, was chartered in 1960. Re- 
cently, it has become the Griffin- 
McDonough Chapter as the result of 
widespread interest of the McDonough 
alumni. The Griffin-McDonough Chap- 
ter is one of the youngest of the twenty- 
one chapters of the National Alumni 
Association. 



In addition to Mr. Lewis L. Banks, 
who is principal of the Moore Elemen- 
tary School. Griffin, Georgia, there are 
twelve members of this organization. 
They are Mrs. Elsie A. Brewton. teacher 
of third grade. Annie Shockley Elemen- 
tary School, Griffin. Georgia; Miss 
Mabel E. Cook, teacher of fourth grade. 
Cora Nimmons Elementary School. 
Griffin. Georgia; Miss Annie A. Gay, 
teacher of second grade. Moore Elemen- 
tary School. Griffin. Georgia; Mrs. 
Anna Smith Johnson, teacher of sixth 
grade. Moore Elementary School, Grif- 
fin. Georgia; Miss Mary H. Lemon, 
teacher of an elementary grade, Henry 
County Training School, McDonough, 
Georgia; Mrs. M. L. Lemon, teacher of 
fourth grade, Cora Nimmons Elemen- 
tary School, Griffin, Georgia ; Mrs. 
Thelma Johnson Roundtree, teacher of 
English, Fairmont High School, Grif- 
fin, Georgia; Mrs. L. Leake Smith. Li- 
brarian, Henry County Training School, 
McDonough, Georgia; Mr. Ernest S. 
Spikes, Spalding County Agricultural 
Agent. Griffin, Georgia; Mrs. Josie R. 
Spikes, fourth grade teacher. Kelsey 
Elementary School, Griffin, Georgia; 
Mr. Alvin Willis, Guidance Counselor, 
Henry County Training School, Mc- 
Donough. Georgia. 

Mr. Prince Jackson, Jr., who is Col- 
lege Alumni Secretary and Editor of 




GRIFFIN-McDONOUGH CHAPTER— Standing, left to right, are: Mr. Alvin Willis, Mrs. 
Anna Smith Johnson, Mr. Prince Jackson, Jr., Miss Mable E. Cook, Mr. Lewis L. Banks, Mrs. 
Hilda Phillips Willis, and Mr. Ernest S. Spikes. Seated, left to right, are: Mrs. Josie R. Spikes, 
Miss Annie A. Gay, Mrs. L. Leake Smith, and Mrs. Elsie A. Brewton. Those not present when 
photo was made were Mrs. L. Lucile Lemon, Miss Mary H. Lemon, and Mrs. Thelma Johnson 
Roundtree. 

Page 6 



The Bulletin, attended the May 14 
meeting in Griffin. He lauded the presi- 
dent of the chapter for the marvelous 
leadership that he has exhibited in mak- 
ing the Savannah State College better 
known in the Griffin and McDonough 
vicinity. Moreover, the National Alumni 
representative congratulated the mem- 
bers of the Chapter for their coopera- 
tion. 

A scholarship will be awarded to a 
student of Fairmont High School of 
Griffin and to a student of the Henry 
County Training School of McDonough. 
Nominees for the scholarship must plan 
to attend Savannah State College and 
rank in the upper ten per cent of the 
graduating class. 

Mr. Lewis L. Banks, was notified re- 
cently of being awarded a complete ex- 
pense paid (tuition, room and board) 
Fellowship Grant from the Division of 
Administration and Education of the 
University of Kentucky. The Grant is 
for nine weeks and will commence in 
early June. 



Hardwick 

(Continued from Page 5) 

toward strengthening this area in all of the 
Savannah Negro Schools. 

In the summer of 1960, he won a National 
Fellowship to attend Howard University where 
he specialized in radiation biology. His project 
consisted of running surveys on radiation fall- 
out around Washington, D. C. The study was 
considered so outstanding that he received a 
special certificate of merit. 

As head of the Biology Department at 
Beach High School, Savannah, he was cred- 
ited with having developed one of the best 
science departments in the State of Georgia. 

He holds professional memberships in the 
National Education Association; Chatham 
County Teachers Association; and the Biology 
Teachers Association. He is a member of the 
Young Men's Christian Association; St. Phil- 
lips Monumental A.M.E. Church; and a mem- 
ber of the Board of Directors of the Chatham 
County Employees Federal Credit Union. He 
is immediate past president of Beta Phi 
Lambda Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha Fra- 
ternity, Inc. 

Mr. Hardwick, a native Savannahian, was 
educated in the Savannah School System and 
received his B.S. from Savannah State in 1950. 
He received his Master's degree from the Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh in 1959. This summer, 
he has been selected to study towards the doc- 
torate in Supervision at North Carolina Col- 
lege. 

He is married to the former Miss Beautine 
Williams, "Miss Savannah State College" of 
1950-51. They have two sons, Clifford, IV, 
and Kenneth Allen. 

SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



Special Awards Committee 



Wilton C. Scott Receives Top Award 



Wilton C. Scott, Director of Public- 
Relations at Savannah State College, was 
recently notified that he has won a 
special award in the 1962 Newspaper 
Fund Special Awards Competition. A 
$500 check accompanied the citation. 

In announcing the Award, The News- 
paper Fund Special Awards Committee 
stated that in the many years of judg- 
ing contests, never had such remarkable 
performances been seen and the judg- 



ing assignment as a consequence, had 
been made extremely difficult. 

The Committee further stated. "The 
award to you is our way of recognizing 
your unusual achievements in scholastic 
journalism. We were particularly 
pleased with your efforts beyond the 
call of duty to attract bright young peo- 
ple toward careers in journalism. We 
are proud of our association with you. 
your school and your students. 1 ' 




Wilton C. Scott, Savannah State's nationally famous Public Relations director, is shown 
being congratulated by Edward R. Murrow, Chief II .S. Information Service Director and former 
nationally known TV Commentator. This meeting between two of the top men in their respective 
fields took place at Columbia University in New York City. Mr. Scott left Columbia to teach 
a special course in journalism at the University of Michigan. 



Reprint — Sav'h Morning News 

Tigers Rated No. 1 

The Savannah State College Tigers recently 
were named the No. 1 scoring machine in the 
nation and deadeye forward Redell Walton 
was tabbed for second team All-America hon- 
ors, according to the National Association of 
Intercollegiate Athletics. 

Coach Ted Wright's short but talented 
Tigers poured in points at a record chip, the 
NAIA announcement said. 

Operating with a fast-breaking, compara- 
tively small starting five, the Tigers hit the 
bucket for a 97 point average, almost a full 
point better than the second place squad. 

Holding the second slot is Troy (Ala.) 

SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 



State College with a 96.3 average. Gorham 
(Maine) State's 95.8 was good for third. 

NAIA champion, Prairie View A&M, could 
do no better than 19th with an 85.6 mark. 

Coach Wright's senior five, shooting for the 
NAIA title for the fourth straight year, fin- 
ished with a 26-3 seasonal record and moved 
to the second round of the National Tourna- 
ment before being eliminated. 

Not only did Savannah State outscore all 
other NAIA ball clubs, it was eighth on the 
margin of victory list. The Tigers averaged 
winning by 16.3 points per game. 

Walton, 6 ft. 2 forward with a deadly jump 
from anywhere on the floor, was the ringleader 
in the powerful Tiger attack. 

Walton was ninth in the NAIA scoring 
parade with a brilliant 29 points per game 
average. 




Redell Walton 



Reprint — Sav'h Morning News 

Tigers Win Third 
Straight NAIA Crown 

The Savannah State College Tigers roared 
from a three point half time deficit to stop 
the Miles College Golden Bears in an 87-84 
thriller before a capacity crowd at the Savan- 
nah Sports Center, which earned them the 
right to represent this district in the National 
Tournament which was held in Kansas City, 
Missouri, March 12 through 17. 

Miles, fresh from a dazzling upset victory 
over South Carolina State, made a desperate 
bid to capture their first District Crown, but 
was stymied by the unyielding Savannah State 
Tigers. 

Savannah State got off to an unusually slow 
start but found the range in the second half 
to stave off the relentless attack of the boys 
from Alabama. 

Miles, using an all court press defense, held 
Savannah State's Ace Redell Walton to a 12 
point first half effort. 

All during the first half the Bears' Raymond 
Moller and Savannah State's Redell Walton 
staged a terrific defensive battle under the 
boards. 

Guard Eugene Underwood, the Bears' lead- 
ing scorer all season long, managed to scrape 
the Savannah State defense for 12 points. 

Walton, a 6 ft. 2 senior, from Chicago's 
Crane High School, led both teams in scoring 
with 41 points, and walked off for the second 
straight year with the playoffs' most valauble 
award. 



Attend Your 
Alumni Association 
Meetings Regularly 



Page 7 



Willie C. Jones 




Active in Alumni Chapter and School 

One of the most outstanding members of the Bulloch County Teachers and 
of the Bulloch County Chapter of the Education Association, Chairman of the 
Savannah State College Alumni Asso- William James Scholarship Committee, 
ciation is Willie C. Jones of Savannah, member of the Georgia Teachers and 
Georgia. Education Association, Co-Chairman of 

the Science Department, Chairman of 
the Guidance Committee, Chairman of 
the Budget and Auditing Committee, 
Advisor to the Gamma Alpha Hi-Y Club, 
Nu Theta Lambda Scientific Honorary 
Society, affiliated with the Science Clubs 
of America, and the Future Teachers of 
.-^^ | America. 

He is affiliated with the National 
Education Association, Bulloch County 
-*> Teachers and Education Association, 

Region Eight Teachers Association, 
P.T.A., Y.M.C.A., Alpha Phi Alpha 
Fraternity, the Jaguar's Civic and So- 
I -' cial Club, Les Elite Social Club, and a 

parishioner of St. Thomas A.M.E. 
; Church, where he serves as a Trustee, 

and Chorister (if the Senior Choir. 

Because of his performance on the 
National Teachers Examination, Mr. 
Jones has recently qualified for a grant 
from the State Department of Educa- 
tion, to study at the five year level. 

Mr. Willie C. Jones, Jr., is the son of 

Mr. Willie C. Jones, Sr., and the late 

Mr. Jones is presently serving as one Mrs. Gertrude Owens Jones. Mr. Jones 

of the Senior Class sponsors of William was unanimously selected as Bulloch 

James High, a position for which his County's Teacher of The Year. 

many talents make him an invaluable TWF 

asset. He has a variety of interests, 

ranging from command of the dance, to BULLOCH COUNTY CHAPTER 

his congenial singing voice, to his President Mrs. Etheleen B. Talbert 

agility with the piano. Vice President Mr. Willie C. Jones 

a j -li i\/r t wn Secretary Mrs. Juanita Wells 

Academically, Mr. Jones serves Wn- J J 

liam James High School as Science and Asst Secretary. Mrs. Frankie Stevens 

Biology instructor. His additional list- Treasurer Mrs. Pearl Bellinger 

ings are: Vice President of the Bulloch Advisors Mrs. E. M. Martin 

County Chapter of the Savannah State Mrs. J. P. Bryant 

College Alumni Association, Treasurer Mr. J. W. Lawton 

Miss Ruby Lee King 

Chatham County Names Teacher of the Year 

Miss Ruby Lee King, teacher at Paulsen Elementary School, was named 
Chatham County Teacher of the Year. 

Miss King, a 1939 graduate of Savannah State College, possesses characteristics 
of a master teacher. She received her M.Ed, degree from Atlanta University in 1951, 
and a Professional Diploma from Teachers' College, Columbia University in 1961. 

Miss King is known for her outstanding contributions in school, civic and 
community activities. She served as secretary for ten years of the Savannah State 
College Alumni Association. She is a member of Greenbriar Childrens' Center, Inc., 
Y.W.C.A., Y.M.C.A., local, state and national professional organizations. 

Besides being a member of Asbury Methodist Church, Miss King is Church 
School teacher, choir member and member of the Commission on Finance. 

At present Miss King holds the offices of Chaplain of Paulsen P.T.A., and 
Basileus of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority. 

Page 8 




Mrs. Lillie Ladson 
Receives Fellowship 

The University of Illinois recently an- 
nounced that Mrs. Lillie Jackson Lad- 
son, 1954 outstanding Math Department 
graduate of Savannah State, has been 
selected by the University to study there 
during the 1962-63 academic year. 

Mrs. Ladson, one of Savannah's most 
competent secondary school math teach- 
ers, is an outstanding personality and is 
called upon frequently for her sugges- 
tions in the mathematics area. 

She is the mother of a son and the 
wife of William H. Ladson, an alumnus 
of the College. 



Rose Ann Lanier Serves in 
NAVASPUR Space System 

Miss Rose Ann Lanier, outstanding 
1960 graduate of the Mathematics De- 
partment of Savannah State College, is 
now serving as a mathematical analyst 
in the United States Naval Space Sur- 
veillance System. NAVSPASUR is the 
Navy's first operational space surveil- 
lance system and has been in operation 
for a little more than a year now. 

The Laboratory has a Professional 
Development Program in which under- 
graduate and graduate courses in math- 
ematics, physics and engineering are 
offered on the site through American 
University and Virginia Polytechnic 
Institute. Miss Lanier is enrolled in 
several of these courses. 

SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



District of Columbia Chapter 



Hold Annual Meeting and Banquet 



The D. C. Chapter of the Savannah State 
College Alumni Association held its fourth 
Annual Banquet in the exclusive dining room 
of the Caruso Restaurant, 427 11th Street, 
N.W., Washington, D. C, March 31, 1962. 
The dining room tables were arranged in a 
U-shape and were set to accommodate seventy- 
five people. It was attended by approximately 
fifty Savannahians and their guests. Among 
the many guests were Mr. and Mrs. Marvin 
Ward, Dr. Gordon of Savannah, Mr. and Mrs. 
Joseph Robinson of Washington, D. C, and 
Mr. John D. Roper. 

The festivities began with an opening 
prayer by a former Savannah State Alumnus, 
the Rev. Milton Pugh, associate pastor of 
Evangelical Brethren, who is employed at 
Public Housing in the field of Management 
Aid. The toastmaster for this occasion was 
Mr. Henry Ledbetter, Chairman of the Activi- 
ties Committee, and whose committee received 
a round of applause for the splendid job of 
selecting this historical site for this occasion. 

While the menu of the evening was being 
served, which consisted of Caruso's special 
Club Steaks, the toastmaster introduced Mrs. 
Rosa Moore, former secretary, who read the 
lengthy history of the D. C. Chapter. Follow- 
ing the reading of the history and listening 
to fine dinner music and having a few mo- 
ments for chatting, the toastmaster introduced 
Mr. Ellis Trappio, Public Relations Officer, 
who in turn introduced the guest speaker, Dr. 
Booker T. McGraw, a native of Brooks County, 
Georgia. He received the A.B. degree from 
Atlanta University, the M.A. and M.B.A. de- 
grees from the University of Michigan and the 
Ph.D. degree in Economics from Harvard Uni- 
versity. He is serving presently as assistant 
to the Administrator for the Inter-Group Rela- 
tions with the Housing and Home Finance 
Agency. He spoke on the subject, "Com- 
munity Development and Improvement." 

Information gathered from the interesting 
subject caused us to look back and re-examine 
ourselves in reference to the part we have 
played in community development and im- 
provement that is perhaps the most important 
subject in our society and the world today. 
A short question and answer period was con- 
ducted following the address and members 
directed questions to the speaker concerning 
rental of houses and apartments, purchasing 
of houses, and loans that may be secured by 
individuals and groups in various sections of 
the country. 

Rev. Arnor S. Davis, an alumnus and Assist- 
ant Pastor of New Bethel Baptist Church, 
Washington, D. C, and employed with Gen- 
eral Service Administration in the Department 
of Guard, installed the following newly elected 
officers: Mrs. Ora Washington, President; 
Mrs. Eloise Alston, Secretary; Mrs. Lula An- 
drews, Treasurer; Mrs. Eula Hick, Liaison 
Officer; Mrs. Rosa Moore, Historian; Mr. 
William Weston, Vice President; Miss Juanita 
Florence, Assistant Secretary; Mr. James 
Thomas, Parliamentarian; and Mr. Ellis Trap- 
pio, Public Relations Officer. 

Acknowledgments 

The Chapter acknowledged receipt of litera- 
ture from President Payne and the school and 
is looking forward to regular communications 
from the school concerning its future activi- 
ties. The members of the D. C. Chapter are 
to be commended for the efforts put forth in 
recruiting old and new graduates from Savan- 

SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 



nah State College and for making possible a 
home away from home for those yet to come. 
A roster was sent to the College for future 
publications. 

Annual Project 

The Annual Project in lieu of the custo- 
mary selling project or sponsored project will 
consist of an assignment of $5.00 per member 
for this year. 

Constructive Service Project 

The Constructive Service Project, Mrs. Rose 
Moore, Chairman, recommended by Rev. Ar- 
nor S. Davis, in cooperation with the council 
of churches for District of Columbia, has 
undertaken to support the Hope Valley Camp 
(a year round camp for boys) by contributing 
one day of service toward its erection and 
donations. 

Announcement 

Miss Juanita Florence was married to Mr. 
Wilbert Wells on April 4, 1962 by Dr. C. T. 
Murray, Pastor of Vermont Ave. Baptist 
Church, Washington, D. C. 

New Members 

Miss Mary Barnes, 2719 Georgia Avenue, 
N.W., Washington, D. C. Miss Barnes is em- 
ployed at the Smithsonian Institution in the 
Department of Radiation of Organism. 

Mr. Charles W. Lee, II, 1305 Shepherd 
Street, N.W., Washington, D. C. Mr. Lee is 
employed at the Veterans Administration Hos- 
pital in the Department of Psychology Re- 
search. 



Students to Receive 
National Science Grants 

The National Science Foundation and the 
Frederick Gardner Cottrell Program of the 
Research Corporation of New York have 
awarded undergraduate Grants to Savannah 
State College for the purpose of conducting 
research in Cottonseed and other field crops 
and also give high scholastic averaged chemis- 
try students on the job training while attend- 
ing school. 

According to Dr. Charles Pratt, Head of the 
Chemistry Department at Savannah State Col- 
lege, approximately five students will receive 
Grants to conduct research under his super- 
vision. 

Dr. Pratt, a newcomer at Savannah State, 
has been conducting research in cottonseed 
for the National Cottonseed Association for 
about three years prior to his appointment at 
Savannah State. 

The National Science Grant, effective Sep- 
tember, 1962, and proposed for three years 
has awarded $3,200 to be renewed each year; 
$1,500 for two scholarships along with addi- 
tional funds for Laboratory apparatus, field 
study and equipment. The title of the project 
is "Isolation and Identification of Organic 
Pigments in Cottonseed and Other Field 
Crops." 

The objectives of the project are to intro- 
duce the students to the methods of problems 
approach used by the chemical investigator, 
acquaint students with problems which may 
be suitable for graduate work, and help stu- 
dents develop a method of organizing acquired 



knowledge so that the transition from under- 
graduate to graduate study can be made with 
a minimum of difficulty. 

The Frederickk Garner Cottrell Program of 
the Research Corporation of New York has 
offered its Grant of $3,200 for one year which 
became effective as of May 1, 1962. Approxi- 
mately $1,000 per pupil will be awarded. In 
addition to this the student will be employed 
on an hourly basis. Once selected the student 
will do research under Dr. Pratt's supervision 
in "Chemical Characterization of the Glyco- 
sides and Odd Type Sugars in Cottonseed." 

To become eligible for both Grants the 
student must be a chemistry major with an 
average of "B" or higher, must have recom- 
mendations from the Chemistry Staff, and 
must be a junior or senior. 



Mrs. Lucile Dixon Wiley, 
Wife of Second President, 
Dies in Albany 

Mrs. Lucile Dixon Wiley, a native of Sa- 
vannah, passed away in Albany, Georgia, 
March 9, 1962. She was buried in Valdosta, 
Georgia. 





Mrs. Wiley was a graduate of the Georgia 
State College 1903 class. It was there she 
met' Cyrus G. Wiley, who was a student at 
the College. After their graduation and start 
of their careers, they were married and 
established their home at Valdosta, Georgia. 
After years of further professional prepara- 
tion and service, Professor Wiley was ap- 
pointed President of Georgia State Industrial 
College as successor to President Richard R. 
Wright, the first President of the College. 

As First Lady of the College, Mrs. Wiley 
endeared herself to her former home town 
people. Following President Wiley's death, 
she became Dean of Women at Morris Brown 
College, Atlanta, Georgia. She later accepted 
a similar position at Albany State College, 
Albany, Georgia, where she served until her 
retirement a few years ago. 

She maintained her residence with friends, 
Mr. and Mrs. Kirkpatrick of Albany State 
College until her death. 

There are no immediate relatives but she 
left a host of friends among whom is a 
classmate from Elementary School, Mrs. Made- 
leine Victory Hannar. 

Mrs. Wiley's last appearance in Savannah 
was at the 1961 Alumni Banquet where she 
made some remarks and comments about the 
great growth of the College (see page 4 of 
the November 1961 Alumni Newsletter). 

Page 9 



ALUMNI BRIEFS 




Shown (left to right) are Mrs. Nadine 
Lewis, Benjamin Lewis and Miss Katie Wil- 
liams at a recent alumni reception in the 
Student Linion Building on the Campus. Mrs. 
Lewis and Miss Williams are teachers in the 
Savannah Puhlic Schools. Mr. Lewis is a 
postal employee and highly recognized as one 
of the state's outstanding young orators. His 
work with youth and his participation in the 
many civic programs in the city of Savannah 
has established him as one of Savannah State's 
most outstanding graduates. 



Mrs. Lenore Golden 
Shackelford is Coun- 
selor at Washington 
Street High School in 
Quitman, Georgia. She 
is a 1950 graduate of 
State and received the 
M. A. degree from 
Florida A. & M. Uni- 
versity in 1959. 





Juanita Howard Dar- 
risaw, 1960 graduate is 
now teaching at Whit- 
man Street High School 
in Toccoa, Georgia. 
She also serves as 
Dramatics advisor. 



Janie Baker Bowers 
is now first and second 
grades teacher at Mon- 
teith Elementary 
School in the Chatham 
County School System. 
She served as reporter 
for the Chatham Coun- 
ty Teachers Association 
for two years (1960- 
62) , was a delegate to 
the recent G. T. E. A. 
meeting in Atlanta, 
serves on Executive 
Board of C. C. T. A., 
serves as Curriculum Counc 
N.D.E.A. Science representative. She 
ated in 1949 from Savannah State. 




il Li 



and 



idu- 






Alice B. Williams is 

now serving as Post- 
mistress at Savannah 
State College. While 
at Savannah State, she 
was an outstanding 
student and excellent 
speaker. She gradu- 
ated in 1958. 




Shown at left are 
Henry W. Tarver and 
his wife, Mrs. Ella M. 
Tarver. Mr. Tarver is 
now teaching in Meri- 
wither County and 
Mrs. Tarver is teach- 
ing in Troup County. 
Both have more than 
30 years of outstand- 
ing teaching experi- 
ence. Mr. Tarver has 
been named 1962 - 63 
Teacher of the Year at 
Meriwether Count y 
Training School in 
Manchester, Georgia. 
A quick glance at his 
past experiences is 
similar to what one 
might lind in "Who's 
Who." Mr. Tarver has 
served 26 years as a 
principal in Georgia 
and 8 years as a 
teacher. Mrs. Tarver 
served 20 of her 36 
years of teaching with 
her husband. They are 
the parents of 2 daugh- 
ters, both teachers in 
Troup County. 



Mrs. Richardine 
King, charming wife of 
Mr. Moses King, is a 
1961 graduate of Sa- 
vannah State College 
with a major in Busi- 
ness Administration. 

Mrs. King is pres- 
ently employed as the 
efficient secretary ol 
Paulsen Elementary 
School in the Savannah 
Public School System. 
Her dynamic personal- 
ity has won for her the 
esteem of all with whom she works. 

She is a member of the recently organized 
Secretary's Educational Association, which 
includes secretaries from all Negro Elementary 
and High Schools in Chatham County, and is 
an ardent member of Mount Zion Baptist 
Church where she teaches Bible School and 
is a member of the Choir. 



Theresa Berni ta 
Coleman is now teach- 
ing in Roberta, Geor- 
gia, at the Crawford 
County Training 
School. 

She is a 1957 gradu- 
ate of Savannah State. 





Shown at left is Miss 
Mattella Maree, 1961- 
62 Georgia Teacher of 
the Year. Miss Maree 
is very active in alumni 
work. She has chaired 
several important com- 
mittees this year in the 
Savannah Chapter. She 
will be honored by the 
Savannah State College 
National Alumni Asso- 
ciation on June 2, 1962 
at the Alumni Ban- 
quet. 



Annie B. Robinson 
Wilson is now living in 
Long Branch, New Jer- 
sey. While at State, 
she and her husband, 
John Wilson, were very 
active in student af- 
fairs. 




Page 10 



Gardner J. Hobhs was granted a National 
Science Foundation Summer Fellowship to 
study at Texas Southern University this sum- 
mer. He is now teaching in Jefferson County. 

Mrs. Georgia Mae Williams is now princi- 
pal of Oak Hill Elementary School, Toccoa, 
Georgia. 

Johnny R. Ponder, 1956 graduate, is now 
employed by Douglas Aircraft Company in 
the computing Center for Missile-Space in 
Santa Monica, California. 

Jean Miller Farmer, 1954 graduate is now 
a fifth grade teacher at the De Berry School 
in Springfield, Massachusetts. Margaret 
Batchelor Wilson is also teaching in the 
Springfield System. 

Virgil Ladson. Jr.. is now a B-52 navigator 
in the U. S. Air Force at Beale Air Force 
Base, California. He was in Savannah re- 
cently on leave and looked great in his 
officer's uniform. 

Ruth Steele Daise, 1949 graduate is teach- 
ing at Tompkins Elementary School in Sa- 
vannah. She recently received the M.A. de- 
gree from New York University. 

SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 




Shown above is Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Young being congratulated by Albert King, a 
member of the 1962 class. Dr. Payne (far right) smiles approvingly. Mr. Young was honored 
for his years of outstanding work in the community and his many contributions to the College 
through his work with the alumni of Savannah State. 




John Lawton (left) outgoing president of the Georgia Teachers and Education Association 
receives a plaque from J. S. Wilkerson, Principal of Risley High School, Brunswick, Georgia. 
The plaque, given by the Association, was in appreciation for the outstanding progress during 
Mr. Lawton's administration. Mr. Lawton is a member of the 1938 class. 



Thelma A. L. Denson is teaching at North 
Carolina College. She formerly taught at 
Swainsboro High and Industrial School. Under 
her tutorage, some of the best girls' basketball 
teams in the State were produced. 

Charles S. Tootle, Sr., has been appointed 
to the position of Teacher of Social Studies 
at the Troup Junior High School in New 
Haven, Connecticut, for the 62-63 school year. 
During the past year he has worked in Grace- 
New Haven Hospitals' psychiatric ward as an 
aide to the Juvenile Court in New Haven. He 

SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 



graduated in the June 1961 class and was 
known as a "power" on the campus while an 
undergraduate. 

Mrs. Mary B. Trawick, formerly Supervisor 
of Clarke County, has returned from overseas 
and is now Jeanses Curriculum Director in 
Gainesville, Georgia. She has promised the 
Editor of the Alumni Bulletin a write-up of 
her story overseas. This story will appear in 
the next issue of the Alumni Newsletter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Peter J. Casey of the 1902 
Class will not be able to attend the Class re- 



Mr. Eddie McKissick, '56, and Mr. Joseph 
Burroughs, '59, are employed by the Chatham 
County Board of Education in the Industrial 
Arts Department of Sophronia Tompkins High 
School, Savannah. Mr. McKissick is the Indus- 
trial Arts Woodworking instructor, and Mr. 
Burroughs is the Mechanical Drawing instruc- 
tor. 






The vivacious and lovely Mrs. Lillie 
Allen Powell and her beautiful daugh- 
ter, Deborah Patricia, is shown above. 
Deborah was very recently and appro- 
priately crowned "Queen of Bethlehem 
Community Center." Mrs. Powell is a 
1953 alumna and is presently serving as 
Secretary in Public Relations and 
Alumni Affairs. She also serves as Asso- 
ciate Editor of all the College Publica- 
tions, Homecoming Bulletin and the 
General Information Bulletin. 

As an astute office manager, she is 
sometimes called "the right hand" of 
the Alumni Secretary and the Director 
of Public Relations. 

Mrs. Powell is married to Sgt. Samuel 
Powell who is a former student of SSC 
and is now stationed at Fort Gordon in 
Augusta, Georgia. 

union this year. They are both retired and 
living in Chicago. 

Hosea J. Lofton, member of the 1952 class, 
is no wan Instructor of English at St. Augus- 
tine's College in Raleigh, North Carolina. He 
formerly taught at Lee Street High School in 
Blackshear. 

Talmadge Anderson is now a member of the 
Department of Business at Allen University in 
Columbia, South Carolina. 

Betty Jean Williams is Secretary at Sol C. 
Johnson High School in Savannah. She is a 
member of the K61 class. 

Ruby Sims is a tecaher of mathematics at 
Sol C. Johnson High School in Savannah. She 
is a member of the 1961 class. 

Page 11 



Admission Information 



Persons who are at least fifteen years of age and 
who present evidence of good moral character, adequate 
ability, sound health, and interest in a specific course 
of study are eligible to apply for admission to the several 
departments of the college. 

Formal Application Required 

Each candidate for admission is required to make 
formal application and thereafter submit such creden- 
tials as may be needed to support the application. 
Admissions correspondence should be addressed to the 

Director of Admissions 

Savannah State College 

State College Branch 

Savannah, Georgia 

Transcripts and recommendations should be mailed 
directly from the applicant's former school to the 
Director of Admissions. The application form with 
instructions may be obtained by writing the Director of 
Admissions. 

^ESTIMATED GENERAL EXPENSES 

For One Academic Year of Three Quarters 
NOTE: Fees remitted by mail should be sent by 
money order, cashier's check, or certified check payable 

to SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE. 

Per Quarter Per Year 

Matriculation Fee $ 60.00 $180.00 

Health Fee 3.00 9.00 

Student Activity Fee 8.00 24.00 

Student Group Insurance 

(see below) 5.00 15.00 

Total Charges — 

Day Students $ 78.00 $234.00 

Room, Board and Laundry . . . $187.00 $561.00 
Total Charges — 

Boarding Students .... $265.00 $796.00 

The above table includes basic fees only. Other 
charges are assessed where applicable. Please see 
"Explanation of Fees." All charges are subject to 
change at the end of each quarter. Normal cost of 
books and supplies approximate $30.00 per quarter. 
Students are required to secure all books, supplies and 
tools necessary for satisfactory completion of courses 
for which they are enrolled. 

All fees are due and payable at the time of registra- 
tion. Students are required to meet their financial 
obligations promptly as condition of their remaining in 
College. Students granted scholarships or work-aid will 
be notified in writing and credit will be made to their 
accounts accordingly. 

Veterans coming to Savannah State College should 
bring with them sufficient funds to pay all fees as 
indicated on the Schedule of Fees. 



Self Help Opportunities 
Worthy and industrious students may help to meet 
college expenses through part-time employment, pro- 
vided they maintain satisfactory scholastic averages. 
These work opportunities include such jobs as clerical 
and stenographic work, library work, waiting tables, 
washing dishes, pantry and kitchen work, skilled and 
unskilled work in the several trades and in maintenance. 

Scholarships 

A limited number of special scholarships are avail- 
able to selected students who meet the required stand- 
ards of scholastic merit, high character, general promise, 
and superior achievement in certain specific areas of 
the college program. 

Students interested in National Defense Loan Funds. 
should -write Chairman of Student Personnel Services, 
Savannah State College, Savannah, Georgia. 

EXPLANATION OF FEES 
APPLICATION DEPOSIT. A student applying for 
admission for the first time is required to send a 
deposit of $25.00 with the application. Upon registra- 
tion, this amount will be applied toward his tuition fee 
for the first quarter. If the applicant decides not to 
enroll at Savannah Stale College, he is required to file 
a request for a refund before the deadline published in 
the College Calendar in the catalog. 

GENERAL DEPOSIT. Lpon initial registration, 
each student will be required to make a general deposit 
of $10.00. This charge will be applied to the student's 
account but will be returned, less any charges that may 
have been assessed against the deposit for such things 
as keys, library books not returned, laboratory or dorm- 
itory breakage, unpaid fees, etc. 

ROOM DEPOSIT. Entering students and continuing 
students who plan to live in the college dormitories are 
required to submit a Room Deposit of $25.00 with their 
requests for the quarter. If the student is not accepted 
by the college, this deposit will be returned in full. 
If the student decides not to enroll, he is required to 
file a request for a refund before the deadline published 
in the College Calendar in the catalog. 

STUDENT GROUP INSURANCE. The Savannah 
State College student group insurance plan has been 
designed to protect all full time students of the school. 
The premium of $15.00 per year is payable in install- 
ments of $5.00 each quarter and the student is covered 
for twelve (12) months — including recess and vacation 
periods. The insuring company will pay up to $250.00 
for each accident — regardless of what other coverages 
the student has. Payment is unallocated; the plan will 
pay for any or all of the following: medical and surgical 
treatment by a physician, hospital confinement and 
nurse's services, miscellaneous hospital expenses, and 
dental treatment made necessary by injury to natural 
teeth. 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

State College Branch 
SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 



Non-Profit Org. 
U. S. POSTAGE 

PAID 

PERMIT No. 142 
SAVANNAH, GA. 



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Homecoming Editioi 



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Miss Savannah State And Attendants 




Full of beauty, lovely to look at 
and charming attendants to our 
beautiful "Miss SSC." 




In the field of Elementary 

Education is adorable Bessie 

Samuels. 



'. ' . ' ' . -■'-'."- ~:L. .J 



"Beauty is the child of love." — Ellis 

Ira Snelson, "Miss SSC," chose Business 
as her major. 





Charming and elegant, Miss Savannah State and 
her attendants greet admirers during the Chatta- 
hoochee Classic Parade in Columbus, Georgia. 



Attractive Dorothy Carter is 
majoring in English. 



Savannah State College Homecoming Bulletin 



October 1962 



President Dr. William K. Payne 

Student Editor B. C. Carswell '63 

Feature Editor J. Randolph Fisher 

Director of Puhlic Relations and 

Editorial Adviser Wilton C. Scott 

Editorial Assistant Mrs. Lillie A. Powell, '58 

Student Assistant Frankie Southerland, '64 

Photographer Robert Mobley 



Savannah State Queens 




The World 



Love built a stately house where fortune came; 
And spinning fancies, she was heard to say 

That her fine Cobwebs did support the frame, 
Whereas they were supported by the same 

But wisdom quickly swept them all away. 

Then pleasure came, who, liking not the fashion, 
Began to make Galconies terraces, 

Till she had weakened all by alteration; 

But reverend laws, and many a proclamation, 
Reformed all at last with menaces. 

Then entered Sin, and with that sycamore 
Whose leaves first sheltered man from 

drought and dew, 
Working and winding slily evermore, 
The inward walls and summers cleft and tore; 
But Grace shared these, and cut that as it grew. 




Lovely Miss Alpha Phi 

Alpha, Majoring in Social 

Science, Matilda Bryan. 



Beautiful Miss Zeta Phi 

Beta, Threasa Lewis, Social 

Science Major. 




Then Sin combined with Death in a firm band 

So raze the building to the very floor; 
Which they effected none could then withstand, 
But love and Grace took Glory by the hand, 
And built a braver palace than before. 

— George Herbert 




Delores Wilson, smiles 

prettily as she poses for 

"Miss Omega Psi Phi" 

Majoring in Chemistry. 




Full of Beauty, Miss Kappa 

Alpha Psi, Artvetta Doanes 

in the field of Business 

Education 



Charming Miss Delta Sigma 
Theta, Majoring in Busi- 
ness Education, Emma Jean 
Smith. 




Attractive as a cloud, Miss 

Alpha Kappa Alpha, 

Majoring in Mathematics, 

Johnnye Paul Wright. 




Worlds on Worlds Are Rolling Ever 

Worlds on worlds are rolling ever 

From Creation to decay 
Like the bubbles on a river 

Sparkling, bursting, borne away. 

— by Percy Bysche Shelly 



The World Is Too Much With Us 

The World is too much with us; late and soon, 
Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers; 
Little we see in nature that is ours; 
We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon! 
The seas that bares her bosom to the moon; 
The winds that will be howling at all hours, 
And are up-gathered now like sleeping flowers; 
For this, for everything, we are out of tune; 
It moves us not — Great God! I'd rather be 
A pagan suckled in a creed outworn; 
So might I standing on this pleasant lea; 
Have glimpses that would make me less forlorn; 
Have sight of protens rising from the sea; 
Or hear old Griton blow his wreathed horn. 

— William Wordsworth 




Charming Miss Sigma Gamma 

Rho, Social Science as her 

choice of a Major, Dorothy 

Dorsey. 





Lovely Miss Senior, Anna 
Cooper, Majoring in Home 
Economics and two wonderful 
attendants, Thelma Evans, 
Majoring in Elementary Edu- 
cation and Freddie Lizzins in 
the field of English. 



Beautiful Miss Y. W. C. A., 

Blanch Winfrey, Majoring in 
Elementary Education. 






i 



Attractive Miss Lampdos Club, 

Lois Carson, Majoring in 

English. 



Majoring in Mathematics, 

lovely Miss Junior, Delores 

Bowens. 



Attractive Miss Y. M. C. A., 

Majoring in English, Izora 

Smith. 



I 




Matilda Wiley, very attractive, 

majoring in Home Economics, 

Miss Technical Science. 




Worldly Place 

"Even in a palace life may be led well!" 

So spake the imperial sage, purest of men, 

Marcus Aurelius. But the stifling dew 

Of common life, where, crowded up 
pell-mell, 

Our freedom for a little bread we sell, 
And drudge under some foolish master's ken 
Who rater us if we peer outside over pen — 
Match'd with a palace, is not this a hell? 

Even in a palace! On his truth sincere, 
Who spoke these words, no shadow ever 

came; 
And when my ill-school'd spirit is affame 

Some nobler, ampler stage of life to win, 
I'll stop, and say: "There were no succour 

here! 
The aids to noble life are all within. 

— Matthew Arnold 




The most charming "Miss 

Camilla Hubert Hall," Murnace 

Coleman, majoring in Social 

Science. 




Beautiful and charming Alice 
Murray, a graduate of St. Pius 
High School, now majoring in 
Social Science at Savannah State 
College reigns as Miss Freshman. 




Frances Shellman, graceful as 
well as attractive, representing 
the college yearbook and news- 
paper staffs, as Miss Student 
Publications. Miss Shellman is in 
the field of Elementary 
Education. 



Lovely Miss Social 
Science, Nellie 
Ogletree and her 
attendants, Sallie 
Ann Jackson and 
Julia A. Jenkins. 



"Miss Wright Hall," Frankie Strickland, majoring 
in clothing and textiles and her adorable attend- 
ants, Susie Peeler, majoring in Elementary Edu- 
cation and Ronella Hood, majoring in Social 
Science. 



The beautiful Miss Busi- 
ness, Lucy White major- 
ing in Business Adminis- 
tration. 




Football 



% 



a__ 







Football team 




Dr. E. J. Dean, Chairman of Com- 
mittee on Intercollegiate Athletics. 



Albert Frazier, Acting Director of Ath- 
letics and Assistant Coach, confers with 
Head Coach Richard Washington, stand- 
ing at the right and George Miller, line 
coach, center. 




SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 
Football Roster for 1962 



NUMBER 
Blue White 



Name 



ENDS 



Class 



Ht. 



Wi. 



Hometown 



81. 
86.. 
83. 
88. 
82 



..81 Ford, Herbert 1 5' 11" 168 Savannah 

.86 Hightower, W. J 2 6' 175 Dublin 

..83 Rawls, Oree 2 5'11" 183 Waycross 

..88 Ray, Harold 1 5'11" 187 Augusta 

..82 Robinson, Hershel 2 6'2" 185 Atlanta 



TACKLES 

74 74 Brown, C 1 6'0" 245 Savannah 

Carthon, Johnny 4 6' 1 " 185 Thomaston 

76 76 Lewis, Bernard 2 6'0" 212 Augusta 

75 75 Locketl, Bobby 3 6'0" 1 95 Macon 

73.... 73 Spann, W. Benjamin 3 6'2' ' 210 Macon 

71 71 Wilcher, Gene 2 6'0" 194 Macon 

GUARDS 

69 69 Carthon, James 1 5' 11" 183 Thomaston 

64 64 Johnson, George 2 5' 10" 201 Brunswick 

65 65 McNeil, Clarence 1 6' 212 Savannah 

61 61 Pennamon, Robert 2 5'7" 163 Augusta 

60 60 Simmons, Willie 2 5' 11" 195 Augusta 

62 -..62 Steele, Chadwick 1 5'7" 190 Savannah 

63 63 Steele, Willie 1 5'8" 169 Savannah 



CENTERS 

51 50 Roberts, Calvin 4 5' 10" 178 Savannah 

52 55 Williams, Sidney 1 5' 10" 189 Brunswick 

QUARTERBACKS 

12 12 Ellis, Frank 1 5'9" 154 Savannah 

16 16 Deadwyler, James 1 6' 152 Atlanta 

14 17 Pratt, McArthur 2 5'10" 168 Dublin 



HALFBACKS 

33 30 Barnes, John 

34 18 Coakienos, Jerry 

31 31 Glover, Thomas . 

35 35 Hayes, E. G 

11 11 Jenks, Henry 

— — Johnson, J 

— — Mungin, Richard 

— — Nixon, Jerome . 



. 1 5'9" 177 Augusta 

.1 5'8" 169 Savannah 

.2 5'8" 168 Columbus 



5'9". 

5'n" 

57". 
5'6". 
5'8". 



143 
172 
156.. 
.154.. 
168 



Savannah 
Savannah 
Savannah 
Savannah 
Albany 



— — Roberts, Jerome 1 5'8" 154 Savannah 

15 15 Saxby, Robert 2 5'7" 165 Savannah 

52 52 Sweets, John 3 5'8" 159 Bainbridge 

FULLBACKS 

13 13 Anderson, Richard 2 5'9" 160 Brunswick 

32 32 Meyers, Freddie 4 5'8" 188 Savannah 



Dr. W. K. Payne, President,- Wilton C. Scott, Director of Public Relations and Publicity,- Richard Washington, Head Coach,- Albert Frazier, Assistant 
Coach and Acting Athletic Director, George Miller, Assistant Line Coach; Marion D. Mendenhall, Chief Scout, Savannah State College,- Lucius Baldwin, 
Publicity Aide,- Elmer Thomas, Game Announcer,- Roscoe Edwards, Trainer,- Earnest Lavander, Trainer. 




if 







The Cheerleaders give three cheers for the Tigers to defeat Clark 
Panthers at SSC's Homecoming. 



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up 


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sr 




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George Johnson, James Carthon, Willie Simmons, and 
Robert Pennamon are known as "the stone wall." 




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Calvin Roberts co-captain and center. 







Oree Rawls, an all-around end. 



Downtown Columbus, SSC's Band marches in the Chattahoochee Classic Parade. 




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Bernard Lewis is . w t 







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^ anK Ste of ^e Tigers 



is 



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his legs 



has 



the 



^iS^ loeomotive. 




R ° bert Saxby has " ' ' 

majic. ieffs of 




Tames McNeal tears down any 
J Tall that confronts him. 



8 



Committee on Intercollegiate Athletics 



Dr. Elmer J. Dean, Chairman 

C. Vernon Clay 

Mrs. Ella W. Fisher 

Albert Frazier 

Dr. Raymond W. Hopson 



B. J. James 
Frank Tharpe 
Richard Washington 
Christopher James 
Israel Small 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



vs. 



CLARK COLLEGE 

November 10, 1962 

2 P.M. 



Committee on Homecoming Activities 



Frank Tharpe, Chairman 
Eddie Bivins, Vice Chairman 
Mrs. Geraldine Abernathy 
Felix Alexis 
Mrs. Martha Avery 
Leroy Brown 



Arthur Dwight 



Mrs. Ella Fisher 
Samuel Gill 
Phillip Hampton 
Miss Doris Harris 
Miss Luella Hawkins 
Eugene Jackson 
Charles Philson 



W. C. Scott 

Ernest Brunson 

Benjamin Colbert 

Otis Cox 

Miss ldella Glover 

Bobby L. Hill 

Miss Leonia Pinkney 



Theodore Pittman 
Miss Carolyn Quillion 
Miss Bessie Samuel 
Miss Ira Snelson 
Miss Georgia White 
Willie Wilkerson 
Charles Wright 



ALUMNI 





Miss National Alumni 

Attractive Miss National Alumni, 
Mrs. Lillian W. Wright, teacher 
at Robert VV. Gadsen School and 
two charming attendants, Mrs. 
Priscilla D. Thomas, teacher at 
Tompkins Elementary School 
and Mrs. Leila Butler, teacher at 
John W. Hubert School. 





General Chairman 
Homecoming 
Frank Tharpe, Assist- 
ant Professor, Indus- 
trial Education. 



John Lawton, Princi- 
pal, Wi 1 1 o w - H i 1 1 
Junior High School, 
Statesboro and past 
President of the 
G.T.E.A. 






Student Council 

Adviser 

Mrs. Margaret C. 

Robinson, Instructor, 

Biology. 



Band Director 
Samuel Gill, Instruc- 
tor, Fine Arts 




Robert F. DeLoach, 
Principal, Tompkins 
Junior High School. 



T. C. Myers, Dean of 
Faculty. 



Nelson R. Freeman, 

Chairman, Student 

Personnel Services. 



Prince Jackson, Jr., 

Alumni Secretary, on 

leave of absence. 



Robert Mobley, Tech- 
nician, Audio - Visual 
Aids. 






Dr. Clyde W. Hall, 
Professor and Head 
Department, Tech- 
nical Sciences. 



William R. Burtow, 
Clerk, Library. 



Arthur Dwight, Prin- 
cipal, Sol C. Johnson 
High School. 



Dr. Stephen M. Mc- 

Dew, Jr., College 

Physician. 



Miss Annette Ken- 
nedy, Teacher, Tomp- 
kins High School. 



10 



Campus Activities 






Dr. and Mrs. W. K. Payne's residence is the scene of 
a reception for the E. A. Bertrands. Mr. Bertrand re- 
signed as Comptroller to accept a position at St. 
Thomas Island in the Virgin Islands. 



Guests chat merrily at a reception honoring Dr. and 

Mrs. W. K. Payne, II at the residence of Dr. and Mrs. 

W. K. Payne, Sr. 





Faculty members who served twenty-five or more 
years at Savannah State College are being honored. 



Freshmen getting acquainted on the lawn: From left 

to right, Gloria Goldwire, Rose Smith, Iris Wright 

and Charles Day. 





Honoring the Freshmen at Dr. and Mrs. Payne's 
reception. 



Freshmen chat with the First Lady, Mrs. W. K. Payne. 






11 




President Payne converses with dele- 
gates to the Fall Conference of the 
Georgia Committee on Cooperation in 
Teacher Education. From left to right: 
Dr. Payne, Mrs. Eva Martin, Con- 
sultant in Guidance, State Depart- 
ment of Education; Mrs. Jessie B. 
Ebanks, Department of Education, 
Morris Brown College; Dr. H. E. Tate, 
Executive Secretary, GTEA. 



Students explore equipment used in a General Mathematics course for Ele- 
mentary Education Majors. From left to right: Margaret Jenkins, Bessie 
Samuel, Annetta Randolph and Theresa Jones. 






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Students during an experiment in Mrs. Ella Fisher delivers the ad- 

Chemistry. From left to right: Hubert dress for the installation of of- 

Owens, Robert Pennmon and ficers and corridor leaders of 

Delores Wilson. Camilla Hubert Hall. 

Savannah State College faculty and students enjoy 
watermelon cutting during summer school session. 



Lucille Lamar, stude 
member of the SNEA 
vannah State C o 1 1 e 
Branch, and Mrs. Ebai 
exchange view. 
Scene from college assembly by SSC band, directed by 
Samuel Gill. 



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Technical Building 




Morgan 





Library 



Willcox Gym 




Wiley Gymnasium 
Wright Hall 



Adams Hall 











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STATE 

COLLEGE 

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This Bulletin is presented in order to give an 
overview of Savannah State College — its facilities, 
its academic program and its activities. If it has 
not already been planned, very soon it will be 
necessary for students and parents to decide where 
the student will continue his education. 

The importance of this decision cannot be over 
emphasized. Why not supplement the information 
contained in this Bulletin by visiting the campus 
and by talking with present and former students of 
Savannah State College, a college which places pri- 
mary emphasis upon quality education. 

The College is located in Chatham County, and 
in the metropolitan city of Savannah, Georgia's old- 
est city and chief seaport. 

SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 
BULLETIN 

Savannah, Georgia 

General Information 

Issue 

The campus, comprising one hundred and thirty- 
six acres, presents a setting of matchless natural 
beauty. Among the more outstanding buildings are 
the attractively designed and modernly constructed 
Camilla Hubert Hall, Adams Hall, and Meldrim 
Hall. 

Several new buildings include a million-dollar 
technical building; a half-million dollar library; 
Wiley Gymnasium; Richard R. Wright Hall, a 
sewage disposal system, and a heating plant. 

The science building has been remodeled. Re- 
modeled Hill Hall now houses a beautiful center, 
post office, snack bar, book store, as well as the 
offices of Student Personnel Services, and Testing 
and Guidance. Morgan Hall has been remodeled 
and houses the Division of Business Administration. 
The College Infirmary, a modern eighteen-bed struc- 
ture provided for students who require treatment or 
confinement for minor illness, has also been re- 
modeled. 

Dates for the Administering of Tests 

College Entrance Examination 

Board May 18, August 14, 1963 

Graduate Record Examination, November 16, 1963 

THE SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE BULLETIN 

President William K. Payne 

Director of Public Relations and Editor Wilton C. Scott 

Contributing Editor J. Randolph Fisher 

Photographer Robert Mobley 

Student Assistant Julia E. Cheely 

Consultant Forrest 0. Wiggins 



Vol 



ume 



XVI 



March, 1963 



Number 4 



The Savannah State College Bulletin is published yearly in October, December, 
February, March, April, and May by Savannah State College. Second Class mail 
privileges authorized at Savannah, Georgia. 





Why Attend 

SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE? 

The reasons for attending Savannah State College are 
many. Here, limited space will permit our mentioning 
only a few. 



First of all Savannah State College has a suburban 
campus on the immediate outskirts of one of the most 
fascinating cities in the entire Southeastern United States. 
It, therefore, has the advantages of a city campus and of 
a campus removed from the city. 

Another reason for attending Savannah State College 
is its terminal courses. To meet the needs of persons who 
are gainfully employed, but who desire immediate special- 
ized training, and for others whose opportunity for formal 
education is limited, the college offers two-year terminal 
courses in dressmaking and tailoring, food production and 
cooking, and secretarial science. Upon satisfactory com- 
pletion of a terminal course, the student is given a certifi- 
cate of proficiency. 

Still another reason is the large number of divisions 
(six) and departments (sixteen) which make up the 
Savannah State College Curricula. Because of this, stu- 
dents have a wide variety of courses from which to select. 
For example, the Division of Business Administration at- 
tempts to give students a sound educational foundation 
for socially effective, gainful work in the business world. 
The Division of Education assumes chief responsibility 
in the selection, guidance, and training of students for 
teachers in the elementary and secondary schools. The 
Division of Humanities provides opportunity for study and 
analyses of the language, literature, art and music in the 
world. 

The Division of Natural Sciences, among other things, 
attempts to give students a knowledge of the biological 
basis of living, to prepare students for the study of 



Dr. William K. Payne, President of Savannah State College 



denistry, medicine, and nursing and to prepare students 
to teach. 

The Division of Social Science, having good citizenship 
as its supreme goal, tries to make able citizens of the 
students through its teaching of history, economics, 
sociology, political science, and other social sciences. 

The Division of Technical Sciences offer training in 
engineering technology, home economics, and industrial 
teacher education. Within the six departments are the 
Department of Business Administration; Economics; 
Secretarial Science; Elementary Education; Secondary 
Education; Health, Physical Education, and Recreation; 
English; Fine Arts; Modern Languages; Biology; 
Chemistry: Mathematics and Physics; History; Sociology; 
Engineering Technology; and Home Economics. 

Naturally, with so many divisions, departments and 
courses at his disposal, the student usually finds the selec- 
tion of major and minor subjects easy. One should at- 
tend Savannah State College because the fees are low and 
the opportunities for self-help (on and off campus) are 
good. A large number of students actually work their way 
through Savannah State College. 

Why attend Savannah State College? Because among 
many reasons: 

1. Savannah State College has a good location, near 
enough yet not too close to an uncommonly inter- 
esting city. 

2. Savannah State College offers terminal courses for 
gainfully employed persons and others. 

3. Savannah State College has six divisions and sixteen 
departments, which offer a variety of courses. 

4. Savannah State College has fees that one can afford 
to pay and opportunities for self-help. 

5. Savannah State College graduates are prepared to 
take advantage of the many good job opportunities. 



The 

Intellectual Center 

of the 

Campus 




The library of a college is one of its most prized 
possessions. The adequacy of its resources and the nature 
of its services to students and faculty largely determine the 
quality of the academic program. On the Savannah State 
College campus, the library is an indispensable unit which 
undergirds the instructional program as well as contributes 
to the recreational reading interests. The library is not an 
adjunct to teaching but the heart of the learning process. 

Centrally located on the campus, the recently built 
building of modular construction provides excellent library 
facilities which make the library a compelling educational 
force in the life of the college students. One of the most 
pleasant features of the building is the open stack area; 
therefore, there are no barriers between books and readers. 
Completely air conditioned, the library includes two 
spacious main reading rooms, periodical reading area, 
circulation department, reference department, curriculum 
materials center, a music room with listening equipment, 
a seminar room, three private studies, an audio-visual 
center, a processing department and a staff lounge. 

The library staff and faculty are busy assembling a 
notable book collection to be used in active support of the 
academic curriculum. Assembling a book collection is not 
enough! The librarian and his staff actively encourage 
students to use books with an emphasis on the role that 
books play in the intellectual life of the academic com- 
munity. The resources of the library include 33,748 
volumes, several-thousand pamplets, 463 periodicals and 
22 newspapers. The London Times, the New York Times 
and the Savannah Morning I\ews are on microfilm. 

As the intellectual center of the campus, the library 
offers the students, faculty and members of the community 
a variety of services. 

'"Let's Listen to a Story Hour," under the direction of 
Miss Althea Williams, Circulation Librarian, is held 
weekly for the children of the community. Dr. Samuel 
Johnson said, "Those who do not read can have nothing 
to think and little to say." Since Dr. Johnson is highly 
regarded in our community, a Great Books Discussion 



Group, under the sponsorship of the library has been 
organized to encourage people to read and meet together 
to discuss great books. 

R. W. Gadsden, a retired educator, and E. J. Josey, 
Librarian, are the co-leaders of the group. Exhibitions of 
paintings by some of the world's great artists are displayed 
in the library periodically. A recently inaugurated lecture 
series has truly the library a market place of ideas. 

All in all, the library of Savannah State College is an 
essential instrument in the life of the academic community. 

The Curriculum 

The formal instructional program of Savannah State 
College comprises the general curriculum, areas of major 
and minor concentration, and terminal curricula. The 
program is organized within these seven divisions: 

THE DIVISION OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

THE DIVISION OF EDUCATION 

Department of Elementary Education 
Department of Secondary Education 
Department of Health, Physical Education 
and Recreation 

THE DIVISION OF HUMANITIES 
Department of English 
Department of Fine Arts 
Department of Modern Languages 

THE DIVISION OF NATURAL SCIENCES 
Department of Biology 
Department of Chemistry 
Department of Mathematics and Physics 

THE DIVISION OF SOCIAL SCIENCES 
THE DIVISION OF TECHNICAL SCIENCES 
Department of Home Economics 
Department of Industrial Technology 

THE DIVISION OF HOME STUDY 



2. 



3. 



The General Curriculum 

The General Education Program proposes to provide opportunities 
for all students to acquire the basic skills, attitudes, habits, apprecia- 
tions and understandings requisite for the good life. 

It seeks to guarantee to all students competency in communication 
and thinking. It further proposes to orient students toward and to 
sensitize them to human and universal good and to the worth and 
dignity of every human being. 

At this College, the general curriculum is preoccupied with the 
major disciplines that: 

1. Acquaint the students with broad areas of knowledge and 
human experience; 

Give them an understanding of themselves, their culture and 
physical environments; 

Provide the students with a sound intellectual and moral 
foundation upon which character and professional and voca- 
tional opportunities may rest. 
The program is concerned generally with freshman and sophomore 
students. However, some attention is devoted to students on the junior 
and senior level of their intellectual maturation. In this respect, general 
eduoation is an integral phase of the experience of all students who 
matriculate for a degree at the College. 

The General Education Program is under the general supervision 
of the General Education Committee and the Coordinator of General 
Education. The Committee consists of students and faculty members. 

Division of Business Administration 

A high school student who is preparing for a career in Business 
via the college route should direct his efforts toward becoming pro- 
ficient in mathematics and English at the high school level. Proficiency 
in mathematics allows him to make quick use of quantitative tools in 
solving business problems. Proficiency in English permits him to 
communicate his ideas. The ability to do both are significant attributes 
of business personnel. 

Though not essential, since the College offers the necessary funda- 
mentals, a student may also take such courses as bookkeeping, short- 
hand and other business subjects which are offered at his respective 
hbdi school. Since more and more high school students are arriving 
at & college with typing skills, it is recommended that a course in type- 
writing be taken. 

One of the advantages of majoring in business is that one is pre- 
paring himself for a wide variety of employment possibilities. Oppor- 
tunities exist for self-employment, for employment in private industry, 
and for employment with the government — national, state and local. 

Some positions, for which training in business at Savannah State 
College is designed to prepare students, include: 
Entrepreneurs Secretaries 

Accountants Stenographers 

Bookkeepers Typists 

Salesmen Business Managers 

Economists Teachers of Business' 

To realize the aims of a person desiring training in business, 
Savannah State College's Division of Business offers courses leading 
to the degree of Bachelor of Science and a terminal, two-year program 
leading to a certificate of proficiency. 

A student who pursues a degree in business at this institution may 
concentrate his efforts in one of the following areas: (1) General 
Business Administration, (2) Accounting, (3) Economics, (4) Secre- 
tarial Science, and (5) The Program for Teachers of Business and 
Distributive Education. 

These curricula also become the bases for advanced study. 





Division of Education 

The Division of Education at Savannah State College is a member 
of the Association of Colleges for Teacher Education. It offers twelve 
curricula in teacher preparation and a program of basic training for 
teacher-librarians. These programs are approved by the State Depart- 
ment of Education. This means that satisfactory completion of any 
program brings automatic certification in the field of study pursued. 

A person majoring in Education at Savannah State College is the 
concern of every division and department of the College, therefore, 
the resources and facilities — as well as the interests and efforts of the 
entire institution, are at his disposal. 

Aside from a strong academic classroom program in general, 
specialized, and professional education, the teaching major at Savannah 
State College has rich, varied, and meaningful laboratory experiences 
which brings one into constant contact with children and youth. 

College- Wide Provision for Teaeher Education 

This Division comprises three departments: the Department of 
Elementary Education; the Department of Health. Physical Education 
and Recreation; and the Department of Secondary Education. The 
preparation of teachers is, however, a college-wide commitment. Be- 
cause every division and department at the College is involved in train- 
ing teachers in some subject matter field, this function engages the 
constant interest and efforts, staff resources, and facilities of the entire 
institution. 

Department of Health, Physical Education, and 
Recreation 

The essential aim of the Department of Health, Physical Education 
and Recreation is to afford professional training for pre-service and 
in-service teachers of health, physical education, and recreation in the 
elementary and secondary schools. A parallel aim is advisement. The 
Department encourages only potentially training in this field. A third 
aim is to provide for all students instruction in the basic principles 
of health and recreational activity needed for wholesome living. 

In pursuance of the foregoing aims, this Department provides a 
four-fold program of instruction. For students who plan to become 
professional workers in the field of health, physical education, and 
recreation — either in schools or in other agencies — the department 
offers a sequence of specialized training leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Education, with a concentration in health, 
physical education, and recreation. 

In addition, for all students enrolled in teacher education curricula 
at Savannah State College, this department provides basic training in 
supervision of one or more phases of a comprehensive health, physical 
education, and recreation program in the schools of Georgia. This 
phase of the work is provided either in selected specialized courses or 
in a minor sequence. Further, for all students enrolled at the college 
this department provides instruction in the fundamental concepts and 
activities of health, physical education, and recreation as an essential 
phase of general education. 

Finally, this department serves the college community through in- 
struction and leadership in the intramural program. The intramural 
program is, in effect, a laboratory in which students enjoy practicing 
the skills learned in general service courses and relish competing with 
their peers. 





Division of Humanities 

The Division of Humanities, as its name implies, is 
concerned primarily with transforming the individual into 
a human and humane person. The technique for realizing 
this aim is that of serious study of the human heritage 
as it has been recorded in literature, music, art, and 
philosophy. In this manner the student deepens his ap- 
preciation, sharpens his intellect, enhances his critical 
powers, and incorporates himself in the mainstream of 
the best that has been thought and felt. 

The Division of Humanities provides opportunities for 
majoring in English, Music, the Fine Arts, French, and 
Spanish. The curricula in these areas are designed also 
to prepare teachers. Thus students who elect to teach 
become purveyors of the humanistic tradition. The College 
provides a means also for meeting the national need for 
persons trained in foreign languages. As future linguists 
and/or teachers, students have an unusual opportunity at 
Savannah State College. A strong faculty in modern 
languages in addition to a recently installed laboratory 
assures the students the means of thoroughly preparing 
themselves in this area. 

Music 

In the area of music, the Department of Fine Arts at Savannah 
State College offers a major program leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Music Education and two minor programs — 
one for prospective teachers in the secondary schools and a non- 
teaching program. All of the curricula have heen approved by the 
three national accrediting agencies — The Music Teachers National 



Association, the National Association of Schools of Music and the 
Music Educators National Conference, as well as by the State 
Board of Certification and the Board of Regents of the University 
System of Georgia. 

Courses include intensive work in theory, history and litera- 
ture, performance, applied music, conducting and music education. 
Although 75 hours are required for state certification, a total of 87 
hours constitutes the four-year music requirement at the College. 
Previous training of at least two years in any applied area is 
required of all prospective majors, but skilled aptitude is recognized 
and accepted in lieu of this requirement if necessary. All majors 
must pursue four years of training in piano, voice, or another 
instrument as well as the same amount of time in their applied 
major area. In addition to the music courses, all candidates for a 
degree take a large complement of courses in general education 
and the professional sequences. 

The five musical organizations — The Marching Band, The 
Concert Band, The Choral Society, The Women's Glee Club and 
The Men's Glee Club — are each directed by a full-time faculty 
member and provide ample opportunity for students inside and 
outside of the department to receive experiences in public perform- 
ance which range from programs on the campus at assemblies, 
church services, vespers, and special programs, to local television 
appearances, concerts in the community, athletic games away from 
home, and concert tours throughout the state and the eastern 
section of the country. Each organization, furtheimore, contains 
student conductors and accompanists who are selected for their 
special skills in each area, thus providing additional opportunities 
for specialized training. 

One of the most important operations in this department is the 
awarding each year of a number of scholarships, called grants-in- 
aid, which are given to capable, worthy applicants in all organiza- 
tions upon recommendation of the department. Depending upon 
the aptitude, academic standing, and financial need of the student, 
these awards are sufficient at limes to provide tuition for a full 
year. Grants are made, however, only to applicants who file the 
necessary forms, are recommended by the department, and are 








approved by the Committee on Scholarships. Recipients, encouraged 
to apply in the spring, are usually notified during the summer, 
well in advance of the opening of the Fall Quarter. 

As for musical facilities, the department occupies three build- 
ings throughout the campus; and because of the increasing enroll- 
ment of music majors, these buildings are fully utilized for classes, 
organizational rehearsals, practice periods, and office space. Pianos 
are provided for practice, and rooms are available for other instru- 
mental and voice practice without charge. Band instruments are 
provided without charge to all band students who need them; and 
complete uniforms, robes, stoles, blazers, and concert dresses are 
available to members of the various organizations. 

For any additional information concerning the music area of 
the Department of Fine Arts, please feel free to address your 
inquiries to Dr. Coleridge A. Braithwaite, Chairman, Department 
of Fine Arts, Savannah State College. 

A Career in Art Can Have Many Rewards 

The rewards can be great for a person with or without "artistic- 
talent. " To gain these rewards, one need only the desire to learn 
and a good place in which to learn. The Art Department at 
Savannah State College provides students with an adequate environ- 
ment for learning. If one has the desire, then he can progress at 
Savannah State College. 

The Art Department is located in new quarters, especially 
designed and equipped with modern studios and lecture rooms 
which take the chores out of learning. The studios are constantly 
being brought up-to-date, making it possible to teach the latest 
use of tools and methods in lithography, etching, serigraphy, 
ceramics, sculpture, and painting. 

Students who have studied art at Savannah State College have 
reaped many rewards. Some have won large sums of money in art 
competition. Some are enjoying the success of exhibiting their art 
at qualified galleries. One former student is in the Pentagon in 
Washington, D. C, where he is using the knowledge of art acquired 



ffln.?*.(|i5 



here. Others have successful careers as teachers of art. And, still 
others have gone on to more advanced studies in school through- 
out the country. 

Art students at Savannah State College occasionally have 
opportunities of getting first-hand experience, as a number of art 
jobs of short duration come into the Art Department. There are 
now some jobs of a more permanent nature waiting to be filled. 

The Art Department is prepared and eager to help students 
in many ways. The rewards can be plentiful for those who are 
seeking; and when they acquire a Bachelor of Science Degree in 
Art Education, they will find that rewards other than salary, posi- 
tion, dignity or fame awaits them. They may learn, ultimately, to 
enrich their lives with things which do not pass so quickly; for, to 
know and be able to enjoy knowing is indeed a divine reward. 

Department of Modern Languages 

The Department of Modern Languages offers instruction in 
three languages: French, German and Spanish. The primary aim 
of the members of the Department is to teach the student to 
understand, speak, read and write these languages so that he may 
communicate with others who speak them. This instruction is 
carried on in daily recitations in the classroom and also in a 
modern fifteen-booth laboratory where the student can increase his 
proficiency by listening to and repeating exercises of various types 
especially prepared for this purpose. For students who wish to 
develop more than an elementary proficiency in French or Spanish, 
the Department offers courses leading to a minor in either language. 
It also offers courses leading to a major in either language. It also 
offers courses leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Education with a concentration either in French or Spanish. 

Outside of the field of education, a person with a major in a 
foreign language can find employment in several areas. First, 
there is the area of organizations of a more or less international 
character. Because of the nature of its work, there is almost a 
constant demand at the United Nations Headquarters for men 
and women who are proficient in foreign languages. 






Jl*C 




Division of Natural Sciences 

The Division of Natural Sciences is proud of the record that it has 
made in helping young people find themselves in the scientific and 
mathematical world during the last quarter of a century. 



Department of Biology 

The Department of Biology is doing great work in helping young 
people prepare themselves in the health sciences. The department offers 
work which prepares one for entry into Nurse training. Those who 
pursue this curriculum receives the basic training that will enable them 
to study nursing in any school in the country. This is true also of 
its premedical and pre-dental curricula. The department also offers 
work for medical technology, and some who graduate in this area 
receive employment in medical laboratories before receiving the pro- 
fessional training. Those who desire to prepare themselves for higher 
educational work, leading to the Ph.D. degree, can get that basic train- 
ing in the Department of Biology at Savannah State College. The De- 
partment of Biology joins with other departments of this Division in 
preparing teachers of science on the secondary level. 



Department of Chemistry 

The Department of Chemistry has made great improvement in its 
physical facilities and personnel, during the last several years. The 
teaching staff, teaching space, and equipment have been increased one 
hundred percent. The Department of Chemistry cooperates with other 
departments of this division in preparing teachers of science for sec- 
ondary schools. It provides basic training for higher education — work 
leading to the Ph. D. degree in chemistry. It also provides all chemistry 
needed in pre-nursing, pre-dental and pre-medical education. 

This Department has much to offer in the area of research. It is 
ready to offer opportunities to gain some insights on research work 
while pursuing regular college work. 



Department of Mathematics and Physics 

The Department of Mathematics and Physics this year, has revised 
its program so that it can better meet the growing demands of mathe- 
matics and physics. 

The program includes the approaches as well as the courses recom- 
mended by the School Mathematics Study Group in 1960. Textbooks, 
course outlines, and other teaching materials are continuously being 
changed to meet today's challenge. 

The present program is designed not only to prepare better 
teachers of Mathematics and Physics, but also to provide them with 
the courses necessary to do further study in areas like linear pro- 
gramming and computing, statistical research, electronics, guided 
missile engineering, mathematics for various phases of industrial re- 
search, actuary sciences, and over twenty branches of governmental 
services. 



Division of Social Sciences 

The Division of Social Sciences offers two major programs for 
persons interested in the social sciences. Curriculum I leads to the 
B.S. degree in the social sciences with a concentration in history. 
Curriculum II leads to the B.S. degree in the social sciences with a 



10 



concentration in sociology leading to the professional study of social 
work. 

Persons who plan to teach social studies in the secondary school 
should enroll in the Teacher Education Program and pursue the B.S. 
degree in Education with a concentration in the social sciences. 

Curriculum I is designed for persons interested in careers in: law, 
government, diplomatic service, general research, Young Men's 
Christian Association, and Urban League work. 

Curriculum II is designed for persons interested in careers as 
social workers, probation officers, vocational counselors, camp 
counselors, employment interviewers, juvenile court workers, welfare 
fund workers, and immigration service workers. 




Division of Technical Sciences 

The Division of Technical Sciences encompasses instructional pro- 
grams in engineering technology, home economics, and industrial 
teacher education which are organized in two departments; namely, the 
Department of Engineering Technology and the Department of Home 
Economics. These departments afford opportunities for students to 
pursue curricula leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science with 
majors in foods and nutrition and institutional management, textiles 
and clothing, building construction technology, electronics technology, 
mechanical technology, industrial arts education ; trade and industrial 
education. The latter two teacher education programs are offered in 
cooperation with the Division of Education. 

A major portion of the offerings of the Division of Technical 
Sciences is designed to prepare persons for immediate employment in 
the industrial world as professional and semi-professional workers in 
technical home economics and engineering technology. Individuals in- 
terested in careers in these areas should be well grounded in the applied 
sciences. Such high school subjects as physics, algebra, plane geometry, 
trigonometry and industrial shop are very desirable for persons 
planning to pursue engineering technology curricula, and chemistry is 
essential for those interested in technical home economics. 

The Division of Technical Sciences offers the required shop work 
and special subject preparation for students who plan to teach indus- 
trial arts education, or trade and industrial education. The industrial 
arts education program does not attempt to prepare persons for success- 
ful employment in industry as skilled or semi-skilled workers, but 
provides a variety of industrial shop activities augmented by ap- 
propriate general and professional education courses leading to com- 
petence in industrial arts teaching at the secondary level. The trade 
and industrial education program is designed for those persons wishing 
to teach trade and industrial subjects on a vocational basis in the 
secondary schools. In order to pursue this program successfully, one 
must have already learned a trade and worked in industry for two 
years as a journeyman at the trade he wishes to teach. 

Engineering technology is an area of knowledge embracing those 
phases of physical sciences, mathematics, and the practices of modern 
industry which are utilized in the design and manufacture of the 
machines, structures, power sources, communication systems, and ma- 
terials needed to maintain a highly civilized society. The activities of 
engineering technology are concerned with translating the concepts and 
theories of professional engineers and scientists into actual devices and 
products by using laboratory tests to provide data for rational designs. 
These tests are followed by interpretations of data and the preparation 
of working drawings for the use of the skilled craftsmen that produce 
the devices and products. 





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11 



The Department of Engineering Technology offers curricula lead- 
ing to the degree of Bachelor of Science, with majors in building con- 
struction, electronics, and mechanical technology. 

The curriculum in building construction technology is designed to 
provide ample instruction in those areas of knowledge required for 
successful performance in these capacities: (1) architectural and 
structural draftsman and designer, (2) construction surveyor, (3) 
estimator, (4) materials tester. 

The electronics technology curriculum provides instruction in the 
fundamental of vacuum tube and semiconductor of circuit theory with 
emphasis on the applications of theoretical principles to actual elec- 
tronics devices. Graduates of the electronics technology sequence are 
prepared to function in these positions: ( 1 (electronics draftsman, (2) 
research analyst, (3) communications technician. 

The mechanical technology curriculum provides an opportunity 
for a student to receive comprehensive engineering experiences which 
will enable him to design machinery and to prepare working drawings 
of the same for industry. A graduate of the mechanical technology 
program is qualified to assume the responsibilities of these positions: 

(1) machine designer. (2) mechanical draftsman, (3) automotive 
technician. 

The home economics program is directed toward two major 
objectives. The first of these is to enhance the general education of 
the student through a core curriculum for common learning. The core 
curriculum has three aims: (1) development of the student as a person, 

(2) preparation for family life, and (3) preparation for the responsi- 
bilities of citizenship in its broadest sense. The second major objective 
is preparation of the student to enter and advance with assurance and 
competence in one of the various professions in home economics. 





The Division of Home Study 

The Division of Home Study encompasses instructional programs 
in Business Administration, Economics, Education, English. Geography, 
Government, History, Humanities, Mathematics, Psychology, Social 
Science, and Sociology. These courses are offered for those persons 
who are interested in furthering their education, but are unable to do 
so in residence. 

The Home Study Department is authorized to operate the follow- 
ing programs: 

1. College Correspondence Study 

2. Extension Classes 

There are students enrolled in these courses living in all parts of 
Georgia, Florida, South Carolina, and Alabama; and we have students 
registered from Pennsylvania, Maine and Illinois. 

The Home Study Department is directed toward two objectives: 
The first is to provide a service for those persons who cannot under- 
take residence instruction, and the second is to provide an enriching 
program for those who do not require residence instruction for personal 
growth and enrichment. 

Extension classes are provided upon sufficient demand. 

For information concerning credit, fees, examinations, textbooks, 
etc., you may write to: The Division of Home Study, Savannah State 
College, Savannah, Georgia. 




12 






ACTIVITIES 

Savannah State College puts great emphasis upon a rich and 
varied religious life program. Through its religious activities, the 
College seeks to develop an understanding of and an appreciation for 
the place of religion in everyday living, to deepen spiritual insight, 
and to make the practice of Christian principle a vital part of the life 
of the well educated citizen. 

Religious life activities are directed by the College Minister. The 
Sunday School, YMCA and YWCA, the Newman Club, and the annual 
Religious Emphasis Week provide opportunities for religious growth 
and development under the supervision of the Religious Life Committee. 

Savannah State College contributes to the attainment of a well- 
rounded education by providing many opportunities for students to 
participate in a wide range of significant activities. Through the efforts 
of organized groups, programs are planned for the social, religious, 
and cultural advancement of the college community. 

The Student Council, composed of representatives of all classes, 
works with the administration in the government of the College. It 
works also with the various campus organizations and sponsors projects 
for the general welfare of the student body. 

The Tiger's Roar, official student newspaper, is published every 
six weeks by students under the supervision of the Public Relations 
Office. 

The following organizations also provide media for expression of 
student interests: Art Club, Business Club, Camera Club, Collegiate 
Counselors, Creative Dance Group, Debating Club, Dormitory Councils, 
Economics Club, Newman Club, Savannah State College Players Guild, 
Social Science Club, Student Loan Association, Tiger's Roar, Trade 
Association, Usher's Club, Varsity Club, Future Teachers of America 
(NEA), Home Economics Club, Veterans Club, YMCA, YWCA, and 
the Women's Council. 

The following national social fraternities are organized on the 
campus: Alpha Phi Alpha, Omega Psi Phi, Phi Beta Sigma, and Kappa 
Alpha Psi. 

The following national social sororities are organized on the 
campus: Alpha Kappa Alpha. Sigma Gamma Rho, Zeta Phi Beta, and 
Delta Sigma Theta. 

The national honor societies, Alpha Kappa Mu and Beta Kappa 
Chi, have chapters on the campus. 

The Department of Health and Physical Education conducts a 
well-rounded intramural athletic program of seasonal activities for 
men and for women. Utilizing group games and various sports for their 
full educational and health values, the program features football, 
basketball, track and field hockey, and badminton. 

A member of the Southeastern Athletic Conference, Savannah 
State College maintains competition in all sports sponsored by the 
conference. 

The College also holds membership in two national athletic 
associations, NCAA and NAIA. 

The complement formal education on the campus, the college pro- 
vides many activities for cultural enrichment. Student assemblies, 
institutes, motion pictures, lectures, art exhibitions, dramatics, forums, 
athletic contests, hobby groups, and tours contribute to the general 
welfare of the community. 



13 




ADMISSION INFORMATION 



Persons who are at least fifteen years of age and who 
present evidence of good moral character, adequate ability, 
sound health, and interest in a specific course of study are 
eligible for admission to the several departments of the 
College. 

Formal Application Required 

Each candidate for admission is required to make 
formal application and thereafter submit such credentials 
as may be needed to support the application. Admissions 
correspondence should be addressed to the Director of 
Admissions,, Savannah State College. State College Branch, 
Savannah, Georgia. 

Transcripts and recommendations should be mailed 
directly from the applicant's former school to the Director 
of Admissions. The application form with instructions 
may be obtained by writing the Director of Admissions. 
Inquiries should be made immediately. 



and payable at Fall Quarter Registration or the student's 
initial registration. Please refer to the current college 
catalogue for a complete schedule of fees. 

The above table includes basic fees only. Other charges 
are assessed where applicable. All charges are subject to 
change at the end of each quarter. 

Normal cost of books and supplies approximate $30.00 
per quarter. Students are required to secure all books, 
supplies and tools necessary for satisfactory completion of 
courses for which they are enrolled. 

All fees are due and payable at the time of registration. 
Students are required to meet their financial obligations 
promptly as condition of their remaining in college. Stu- 
dents granted scholarships or work-aid will be notified in 
writing and credit will be made to their accounts accord- 
ingly. 

Veterans coming to Savannah State College should 
bring with them sufficient funds to pay all fees as in- 
dicated on the Schedule of Fees. 



Estimated General Expenses 

For One Academic Year of Three Quarters 

NOTE: Fees remitted by mail should be sent by money 
order, cashiers check or certified check payable to SA- 
VANNAH STATE COLLEGE. 

*Per Quarter *Per Year 

Matriculation Fee $ 60.00 $180.00 

Health Fee 3.00 9.00 

Student Activity Fee 10.00 30.00 

Student Group Insurance 5.00 15.00 

Total Charges— Dav Student . $ 78.00 $234.00 

Room, Board and Laundry . . 187.00 561.00 

Total Charges — 

Boarding Students *$265.00 *$795.00 



* Freshmen and Entering Students pay an additional 
$10.00 General Deposit required of all students upon initial 
registration in any unit of the University System. In 
keeping with the vote of the student body on May, 1962, 
each student will be assessed a $6.00 Yearbook Fee due 



Self Help Opportunities 

Worthy and industrious students may help to meet 
college expenses through part-time employment, provided 
they maintain satisfactory scholastic averages. These work 
opportunities include such jobs as clerical and steno- 
graphic work, library work, waiting tables, washing dishes, 
pantry and kitchen work, skilled and unskilled work in 
the several trades and in maintenance. 

Scholarships 

A limited number of special scholarships are available 
to selected students who meet the required standards of 
scholastic merit, high character, general promise, and 
superior achievement in certain specific areas of the 
college program. 

The aim of the National Defense Student Loan Pro- 
gram is to create at American Colleges and Universities 
loan funds from which needy students may borrow to 
complete their higher education. Students interested in 
National Defense Loan Funds, should write Chairman of 
Student Personnel Services, Savannah State College, Sa- 
vannah, Georgia. 



14 




15 




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SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

BULLETIN 

SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 






1963 ALUMNI ISSUE 



Alumnae Honored As 'Teacher of the Year" 



Mrs. Carolyn K. Dowse 

Mrs. Carolvn K. Dowse. First Grade teacher at Moses 
Jackson School. Mrs. J. B. Hayes. Principal, was named 
"Teacher of the Year" b) her co-workers for the school year 
1962-63. She is a graduate of Savannah State College and 
holds a Masters degree from Columbia University. She is 
an affiliate of the N.E.A., G.T.E.A., A.T.A.. C.C.T.A., West 
Broad Street Y.M.C.A. and Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority. 

Mrs. Dowse works cooperatively and untiringly with the 
program of the school. She is Secretary of the Steering 
Committee. Chairman of American Education Week Ac- 
tivities. Chairman of Group III. First Grade City-Wide In- 
service Group to name a few. 

She is a member of St. Johns Baptist Church where she 
is advisor of the Youth Group. 

She is married to Mr. Isaac N. Dowse, who is also a 
graduate of Savannah State College. 

Mrs. Laura Greene Jefferson 

Mrs. Laura Greene Jefferson, a teacher on the faculty 
of Pearl Lee Smith Elementary School. Savannah. Georgia, 
was elected "Teacher of the Year." for 1963. 

Mrs. Jefferson is a native of Macon. Georgia, where she 
attended grade school before transferring to Saint Frances 
de Sales Academy in Rock Castle. Virginia to complete her 
elementary school work. She is also a graduate of Savannah 
State College. 

Mrs. Jefferson is affiliated with the following civic organ- 
izations: The Savannah Federation of Colored Women's 
Club (president), and the National Federation of Colored 
Women's Clubs. 

She is the wife of William Henry Jefferson, a native Sa- 
vannahian. and the mother of one daughter. 

Mrs. Edith Macon 

Mrs. Edith Macon, named by her co-workers as the 
school's poet, was elected Teacher of the Year for the J. H. C. 
Butler Elementary School for the school year 1962-63. 

She is a product of Chatham County Public Schools and 
a graduate of Savannah State College. Since graduation, she 
has taken many helpful workshops in the areas of Arithmetic. 
Foreign Language. Reading, and Language Arts. 

Her pleasing personality and the polished manner in 
which she works with people, have won her special distinction 
in her profession. Her performance as a classroom teacher 
has been recognized by administrative personnel and teachers. 

For the school year 1962-63. she assumed the responsi- 
bility of chairman of the school-wide Inservice program. 
To this program she has offered many helpful suggestions. 

Mrs. Macon has played a major role in planning and 
compiling of the recent Social Studies Guides which have 
been approved for use in Chatham County School System. 

She holds professional membership in the Georgia Teacher 
Education Association. American Teacher Association. Na- 
tional Education Association, Chatham County Teacher As- 
sociation, and Parent Teacher Association. She is a member 
of Bethel A.M.E. Church. 

She is the devoted wife of Mr. Ralph Macon and the 
mother of three lovely children, Shelia, Ralph, Jr., and Sherill. 

Mrs. Sadie L. Cartledge serves as principal of the J. H. C. 
Butler Elementary School. 



Mrs. Katye W . Bolden 

The principal and faculty of Fell-Jackson Elementary 
School elected Mrs. Katye W. Bolden as their teacher of the 
year for 1962-63. Her status in the field of education has 
established her as being highly worth) of this honor. 

Mrs. Bolden is a product of the local public schools and 
Savannah State College from which she earned the B.S. 
Degree in Education. She holds a Master of Arts Degree 
from New York University. 

Mrs. Bolden is a second grade teacher, who not only 
enjoys her work, but one who counts working with children 
a privilege. She works diligently with all phases of the 
school's program. She is presently serving on the Publicity 
Committee of the school, is the faculty representative on the 
Executive Committee of the C.C.T.A.. and has served as a 
member of the Executive Committee of the P.T.A.; chairman 
of the membership drive; assistant secretary of the P.T.A.: 
member of the In-Service Committee: Advisor of the Student 
Council and grade group chairman. 

She holds membership in the following professional and 
civic organizations: Chatham County Teachers Association. 
Georgia Teachers and Educational Association. National 
Education Association. American Teachers Association. 
Future Teachers of America. Classroom Teachers Association, 
the Y.M.C.A.. the L.O.P. Social Club. She is a faithful mem- 
ber of the St. John Baptist Church. 

Mrs. Mildred W . Glover 

Mrs. Mildred W. Glover has been chosen by her colleagues 
at Tompkins Junior High School as Teacher of the Year for 
the year 1962-63. 

She is a member of the English Department and works 
diligently with the total school program. She serves as chair- 
man of the In-Service Evaluation Committee. PTA Study 
Committee. Attendance Coordinators, and a member of 
the following committees: Steering Committee. Reading Com- 
mittee, and Social Committee. 

Mrs. Glover, an honor graduate from Beach High School, 
attended Savannah Stale College from which she graduated 
Cum Laude. She has done advanced work at New York 
University where she was the recipient of a citation for speed 
and proficiency in t\ pewriting. 

She holds membership in the following organizations: 
National Education Association. American Education Associ- 
ation. Georgia Teachers and Education Association, Chatham 
County Teachers Association. Parent-Teacher Associalion. 
and Delta Sigma Theta Sorority. She is a communicant and 
active with the Connors Temple Baptist Church. 

Mrs. Glover is the wife of Roland Glover. Jr. and mother 
of a son. Kenneth, age 7. 



THE BULLETIN 

Vol. 16 MAY. 1963 No. 6 

Dr. W. K. Payne President 

Wilton C. Scott Director of Public Relations 

and Publication Adviser 

Julia E. Cheely Editor 

Emma Murray Associate Editor 

Robert Mobley Photography 

The Savannah State College Bulletin is published in October, 
December, February, March, April, and May by Savannah State 
College. Entered as second-class matter, December 16, 1947, at the 
Post Office at Savannah, Georgia under the Act of August 24, 1912. 




Dr. W. K. Payne, President of Savannah State College, dur- 
ing office hours. 



Entering and Continuing Students to Benefit From SSC Improvements 



The college has embarked upon a program of building 
and campus improvement. Roads around the campus have 
been re-surfaced and a new 100-room. $300,000 dormitory 
for women students is in the making and should be com- 
pleted during the school year 1963-64. 

The second and third floors of Hill Hall have a new 
look. On the third floor are three music practice rooms, 
music study lounge, four offices, large rooms for music re- 
hearsals and a music-art classroom. There is also an art 
study room, a classroom for ceramics and sculpture, rooms 
for kiln and art supplies in addition to a large room for 
paintings and designs. 

The new women's dormitory at Savannah State College 
will be a two story triple "A" fire-rated one hundred percent 
fireproof building. The exterior walls are to be pressure 



brick, the interior walls to be plastered with vinyl asbestos 
floors in individual rooms, with terrazo ceramic and terra 
cota in hallways, bathrooms, and stairwells. 

The general all over shape of the building will be that 
of a large airplane when at a stand still. The total square 
feet is 1 £5.474. 

The first floor will consist of a lobby, lounge and 
recreation room, apartment facilities for dormitory director, 
hair grooming room, laundry mat. one large storage room, 
and twenty-two bedrooms. 

The second floor will consist of a lobby, hair grooming 
room, storage rooms, and twenty-eight bedrooms. 

The building is so designed for two students per room. 



National Alumni Officers 



W. H. McBride, '49, President, 284 Plaza, Athens, Georgia 
Mrs. Josie B. Sessoms, '36, Vice President, Tattnall County 
High and Industrial School, Reidsville, Georgia 

Mrs. Marie B. Martin, '46, Recording Secretary, William 
James High School, Statesboro, Georgia 

Mrs. Ester S. Bryant, '59, Corresponding Secretary, 1017 
West 37th Street, Savannah, Georgia 



Prince Mitchell. '57. Treasurer, Savannah State College, Sa- 
vannah, Georgia 

Prince Jackson, Jr., '49, Reporter, Savannah State College, 
Savannah, Georgia 

Rev. J. E .Bailey, '17, Chaplain, 604 Waters Avenue, Savan- 
nah. Georgia 



Former Savannah State College Student Aids in the Establishment 
Of Police Department Juvenile Division in Savannah 



William Wallace, a native of 
Savannah, Georgia, Corporal of 
Police with the Savannah Police 
Department, and a former student 
of Savannah State College, was 
selected in 1962, from numerous 
applicants to receive a scholarship 
to study at the University of Minne- 
sota. The purpose of the scholar- 
ship was to enable him to study 
juvenile delinquency in order to 
aid in the establishment of a 
Juvenile Division in the Savannah 
Police Department. 

This Division will go into effect 
on May 1, 1963 under the super- 
vision of Police Captain L. E. Ma- 
hony, and will operate in conjunc- 
tion with the Juvenile Court and 
the Welfare Department. 

Mr. Wallace has been employed 
with the Police Department since 
September of 1948. He began as a 
patrolman. In 1957 he was pro- 
moted to the Plain Clothes Division 
where he worked directly under 
the supervision of Sidney B. Barnes, 
Jr., Chief of Police, participated in 
investigations and solving some of 
Savannah's outstanding crimes and 
worked with the Vice Squad. 

In 1960 he was promoted to the 
Criminal Investigation Division and 
after a one - year probationary 
period, was given the permanent 
rank of Corporal of Police. He is 
a member and Trustee of the First 
African Baptist Church, the South- 
eastern Quarterback Club and the 
Toastmasters International. 

Mr. Wallace is the husband of 
the former Miss Marjorie Frazier, 
who is also a graduate of Savan- 
nah State College and secretary to 
the College Librarian. They are the 
parents of four children; Beverly, 
a junior at Saint Francis De Sales 
High School in Powhatan, Virginia, 
William, Jr., Marcia and Maria. 






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Corporal Wallace during office hours. 








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Police Corporal William Wallace getting ready to make his daily rounds. 




The Wallace family spending an evening at home. Left to right: Maria, William, 
Jr., Mrs. Marjorie Wallace, hAr. Wallace, and Marcia. 



Benjamin F. Lewis Promoted to Supt. of Parcel Post at Savannah, Ga. 




Mr. Lewis at work in Parcel Post Unit located in Savannah, 39th and Bull Streets. 




Mr. Lewis looking on as staff members prepare parcel post mail for distribution. 




Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Lewis relax in their lovely home with a bit of reading. 
Both are alumna of the College. 



Benjamin F. Lewis, Letter Carrier 
Technician, was recently promoted to 
Superintendent of Parcel Post. 

Mr. Lewis comes to this position with 
a well-fortified background, both in 
training and experience. In 1940, while 
a student at Savannah State College, he 
took the Civil Service Examination for 
Letter Carrier, and in 1941 he was 
called to take his first postal position 
and left college with the intention of 
working for one year. But in 1942, he 
was drafted into the armed services and 
served 3 1 /-! years, 2 ! /o of which were 
spent in extensive overseas duty. Upon 
leaving the service, he returned to his 
work with the post office. 

In 1947. in spite of his busy work 
schedule, Mr. Lewis was instrumental 
with the assistance of President Payne, 
in getting the first evening classes for 
veterans inaugurated at Savannah State 
College. As a result of pursuing classes 
at night, he completed work for a degree 
in 1952 and has since this time done 
graduate work at New York University. 
During all of this time, Mr. Lewis has 
maintained full employment with the 
Post Office. 

In August 1962 Mr. Lewis was pro- 
moted from Regular Letter Carrier to 
Letter Carrier Technician and served in 
this capacity until 1963 when he was 
promoted to Superintendent of Parcel 
Post. This appointment is the first of 
its kind in the history of the Savannah 
Post Office. The Parcel Post Unit lo- 
cated in Savannah, 39th and Bull 
Streets, is the receiving unit for all 
parcel post in Chatham County. Mr. 
Lewis is responsible for the efficient 
and successful operation of this unit. 
He has an interracial working staff and 
directs all of their activities. 

Aside from his work with the Post 
Office, Mr. Lewis is well known among 
alumni of the College and has been 
praised extensively for his oratorical 
ability. Civic wise, Mr. Lewis has been 
several times Commander, American 
Legion Post No. 500; member and 
campaign manager, West Broad Street 
YMCA; Sustaining member, Solicita- 
tion Membership; former member 
Board of Directors, Frank Callen Boy's 
Club; Speakers Bureau, Savannah 
Tuberculosis Association; American 
Red Cross Gallon Club; President for 
two years Falcons Club, Inc.; Alpha Phi 
Alpha Fraternity and member of the 
St. John Baptist Church. 

Mr. Lewis is married to the former 
Nadine Cleveland, a graduate of Savan- 
nah State College, presently employed 
with the Chatham County Board of 
Education. 



SSC Alumnus Receives GTEA 
Meritorious Service Plaque 

Alexander Hurse. a graduate of Savannah State College 
and former agent in the Agricultural Extension Department 
of the College, received a plaque from the Georgia Teachers 
and Education Association for meritorious services to edu- 
cation and community growth and development. 

Mr. Hurse is an alumnus of the College's class of 1934. 
He received the bachelors degree in Agriculture from Sa- 
vannah State (then Georgia State), and the masters of 
Science degree in Education from South Carolina Agricul- 
tural and Mechanical College. Orangeburg. South Carolina. 

Before coming to work at Savannah State College. Mr. 
Hurse served as teacher of Vocational Agriculture in Sanders- 
ville. Georgia: Principal and Agriculture teacher of Wash- 
ington High School. Cairo, Georgia; and county agent of 
Ware and Pierce counties. He also served as Area Supervisor 
of the southern section of Georgia. 4-H Club work. While 
working in this capacity, he was one of the founders of the 
4-H Club Center in Dublin. Georgia. 

Mr. Hurse came to Savannah State College to work as 
supply State Agent in charge of 4-H Club work with boys 
of the state of Georgia. He later became permanent agent 
in charge. 

From 1936-1938 he was president of the Savannah State 
College General Alumni Association. He is a member of 
the Georgia Teachers and Education Association, a deacon 
and Treasurer of College Park Baptist Church, and a member 
of the Prince Hall Eureka Masonic Lodge. 

Mr. Hurse retired from his duties as Agricultural Ex- 
tension A"'ent at the College. June 30. 1962. 





Wilton C. Scott, Chairman of the Public Relations Com- 
mittee, Georgia Teachers and Education Association and Di- 
rector of Public Relations at Savannah State College, accepts 
plaque in behalf of Alexander Hurse. The plaque is being 
presented by Milton White, Chairman of the Citation Com- 
mittee, Georgia Teachers and Education Association. 




Wilton C. Scott, Director, Public Relations, Savannah State 
College and Chairman of the State-wide Public Relations Com- 
mittee of the Georgia Teachers and Education Association, 
presents plaque given by the Association to Alexander Hurse. 



Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Hurse read plaque presented to 
Mr. Hurse for meritorious and faithful service to education and 
community growth. 




Dr. W. K. Payne, President, Savannah State College, 
examines plaque presented to Alexander Hurse. 



Mrs. Josie B. Sessoms Supervisor 
And Curriculum Director 

Mrs. Josie B. Sessoms, Supervisor and Curriculum Director of 
Tattnall County is a graduate of Savannah State College with a B.S. 
degree in Home Economics. She was graduated from Savannah Stite 
in June of 1936 and returned in February of 1937 as a teacher in 
the Home Economics Department and as Supervisor of N.Y.A. girls 
in that division. 

She received the Master degree from Atlanta University, Atlanta, 
Georgia and has done advanced study at New York University, New 
York City. Prior to her present position she has worked as teacher of 
Home Economics, Reynolds High School, Reynolds, Georgia; teacher 
of Home Economics, Tompkins High School, Savannah, Georgia ; 
Principal of the Pavo Junior High School, Thomas County, Georgia; 
and Critic Teacher at Savannah State College. 

Mrs. Sessoms has been cited for educational service and accom- 
plishments by the 8th Region Georgia Teachers and Education 
Association and Iota Phi Lambda Sorority. She is a member of the 
First Bryan Church, Savannah, Georgia, Iota Phi Lambda Sorority, 
Elite Temple No. 71 — DT. Elks, Georgia Teachers Education As- 
sociation, National Association of Supervisors and Consultants and 
Georgia Jeans Association. 

She is the foster mother of one niece, Mrs. Eunice S. Andrews, 
teacher at Tattnall County High School; and a nephew, Kennie E. 
Sessoms, who is in the Railway Mail Service. Both are graduates of 
Savannah State College. 

Leroy R. Bolden Is Post 
Manager Housing Development 

Leroy R. Bolden, an honor graduate, English major of the Savannah 
State College class of '39 is Post Manager of Yamacraw Village 
housing establishment. 

Mr. Bolden was graduated from the Alfred E. Beach High School 
valedictorian of his class. While at Beach, he helped to organize the 
first Hi-Y club for the boys of the school. During his enrollment at 
Savannah State College he served as editor-in-chief of THE GEORGIA 
HERALD, the students' publication at that time and of the HU- 
BERTONIAN, the first yearbook. 

He received the Master of Arts degree in Speech Education at 
Columbia University. His job experiences are many and varied. The 
positions that he has held includes his service as teacher and principal 
in the schools of Jefferson and Candler counties and as an English 
teacher at Beach High School in Savannah, Georgia. 

Returning to the Housing Authority of Savannah in 1958, Mr. 
Bolden opened and became the first manager of the new 4% million 
dollar Robert M. Hitch Village. There is an office and 337 modern 
dwelling units. After three years he was promoted to the post of man- 
ager of Yamacraw Village where with a main-staff of eight he super- 
vises the living conditions and the many activities of 480 families in 
the city's largest housing development. He has been active in civic 
and fraternal work. 

Mr. Bolden is married to the former Miss Katye Walker, also a 
graduate of Savannah State College and of New York University. 
She is employed in the public school system and was elected 1963 
Teacher of the Year by the faculty of the new Frances Bartow 
Elementary School. They are the parents of three boys; Leroy, Jr., 
Victor, and Michael Alan. 

SSC Instructor to Participate 
In Illinois U. Summer Institute 

According to a report from Jerry S. Dobrovolny, head of the De- 
partment of General Engineering, at the University of Illinois, Charles 
Philson, an instructor in the Technical Division ( Electricity and 
Radio) of Savannah State College has been selected as a stipend 
participant in the University of Illinois Summer Institute. 

This is an Institute in Engineering Mathematics, and Machine 
Design for Technical Institute Teachers of Electronics Technology 
and Mechanical Technology and will be in session from June 17 to 
August 10, 1963. Mr. Philson was granted a scholarship by the Na- 
tional Science Foundation. 

He is a graduate of Savannah State College and is married to 
Mrs. Louise Philson, also a graduate of the College and a teacher at 
John W. Hubert Junior High School of Savannah. They are the 
parents of three children : Charles, Jr., Veronica, and Anthony. The 
entire family will spend the summer in Illinois. 




Two graduates of Savannah State College chat near marble 
bust of Enrico Caruso. Left to right: Mrs. Josie B. Sessoms 
and Augustus Hill. 




Mrs. Eunice P. Andrews 



Mrs. Josie B. Sessoms 




Mr. and Mrs. Leroy R. Bolden and sons relaxing at home. 
Pictured (from left to right) are: Victor, Leroy, Jr., Mrs. Katye 
Bolden, Leroy Bolden, Sr., and Michael Alan. 



A decision on an a]) peal made to President Payne of 
Savannah State College, Savannah, Georgia, by Messrs. 
Bobby L. Hill and James Brown, Jr., who, for cause on 
April 29, 1963, ivere expelled from the Savannah State 
College. 



Tho following statement is made in reply to a written appeal addressed to me as president 
of Savannah State College on May 8, 1963, requesting reconsideration and relief from the initial 
decision resulting in the expulsion of the two students referred to above. 

1. A Committee composed of three faculty members has given careful consideration to the 
items contained in the appeal, together with all facts available at the institution. 

2. Following the receipt of the recommendations from the faculty committee, 1 have given 
further consideration to all the facts and information available. 

3. After prayerful, comprehensive, and complete consideration, 1 hereby present this official 
decision in reply to the aforementioned appeal: 

a. To provide an opportunity for rehabilitation id Messrs. James Brown and Hobby Hill; 
and 

b. To promote a growing integrity and honesty of purpose among young people; and 

c. To encourage a cooperative and honorable way of life for all young Americans; and 

d. To advance the basic ideals that are necessary to successful individual growth — 

Messrs. James Brown and Bobby Hill are conditionally permitted to resume attendance at 
classes, contingent upon their pledge that they will, as Savannah State College Students, hence- 
forth "exemplify a due respect for order, morality, and the rights of others." Further, they 
will engage in no "conduct deemed improper or prejudicial to the College Community." 

The recommendation of the Appeals Committee and my decision thereon are supported by 
an objective appraisal of pertinent facts in the case, as well as the attached presentments — 



1. To Whom It May Concern 



On April 19, 1963, we sent a release to the Savannah Morning News in which we stated 
that President W. K. Payne dismissed Dr. C. A. Christophe from his position as the head of the 
Department of Economics at Savannah State College. We also sent a copy of the communication 
to President Payne. 

At the time of sending the release, we were of the impression that "dismissal" and "failure 
to renew a contract" were one and the same. We have learned, however, that there is a technical 
difference. We therefore wish to make it known that there was never any intent to misrepresent 
the facts. It was a matter of misunderstanding. There was no offense intended toward President 
W. K. Payne or anyone else. If any offense was taken, we are most regretful and are happy 
to make this correction. 

Respectfully submitted. 

Signed: Bobby L. Hill 

Signed: James Brown, Jr. 



2. To Whom It May Concern: 

We feel that we speak the sentiments of all of the students of the College, as well as 
ourselves, when we say that we regret that there has been some conduct, at times, which was 
improper on the part of some of us. And, we believe that no student desires to do anything 
which will bring discredit to the College. We therefore hope and trust that the conduct of all 
students will now be exemplary for the balance of this school year. 

Since our main purpose for being here is to get an education, we sincerely urge all students 
to return to classes and to apply themselves to the best of their ability; further, we request that 
demonstrations cease. 

Respectfully submitted. 

Signed: Bobby L. Hill 

Signed: James Brown, Jr. 

Signed: W. K. Payne, President 

May 9, 1963 




Dr. W. K. Payne, President of Savan- 
nah State College, greets Dr. Ezra Mer- 
ritt, a graduate of the College, in his 
office. Dr. Merritt received the D.D.S. 
degree from Howard University in June 
of 1962. Dr. Merritt is now serving as a 
dentist for the United States Army. 




Wilton C. Scott, Director, Public Re- 
lations, Savannah State College, present- 
ing a trophy to Mrs. Lillie A. Powell for 
her outstanding services as a secretary 
and for her noteworthy contributions to 
the Southern Regional School Press In- 
stitute over the past four years. The 
presentation was made at a luncheon 
given in her honor following her resigna- 
tion from the College to join her hus- 
band, Sergeant Samuel Powell, in Ger- 
many. 



8 



Dr. Clyde Hall Heads Technical Science 
And Engineering Program at SSC 



Savannah State College, rated as an 
excellent technical and engineering 
center, under the dynamic leadership 
and guidance of Dr. W. K. Payne, Presi- 
dent of the College, not only offers de- 
grees in applied arts and sciences, busi- 
ness and teacher education, but it also 
offers a degree in technical science and 
engineering technology. This program 
is designed to prepare men and women 
to serve in the space age. 





J 



Dr. Clyde W. Hall 



Heading this modern program is Dr. 
Clyde W. Hall, Director of the Division 
of Technical Sciences. Dr. Hall is a 
graduate of Savannah State College; 
U. S. Naval Training School, Hampton 
Institute, Hampton, Virginia; Interna 
tional Correspondence School, Scranton, 
Pennsylvania; Iowa State College, Ames, 
Iowa; and Bradley University, Peoria, 
Illinois. 

His work experiences prior to his 
present position includes: Supervisor, 
Hannibal Square Playground, Winter 
Park, Florida ; teacher at Arkansas A. 
M. & N. College, Pine Bluff, Arkansas; 
Tennessee A. & I. State University, 
Nashville, Tennessee. Dr. Hall was in 
foreign service three years. Dr. Hall is 
a member of the following professional 
organizations: American Industrial Arts 
Association, American Vocational As- 
sociation, American Association of Uni- 
versity Professors, and the American 
Technical Education Association. He 



has written several articles for leading 
publications. 

Savannah State College offers pro- 
grams in the areas of building construc- 
tion technology, electronics technology, 
and mechanical technology. These are 
four-year programs leading to the 
bachelor of science degree in the respec- 
tive areas of specialization. 

The study of English, history, govern- 
ment, economics, mathematics through 
integral calculus, physics, and engineer- 
ing drawing is required of all students 
majoring in a branch of engineering 
technology. 

A student majoring in building con- 
struction technology studies such special 
courses as statics, dynamics, surveying, 
strength of materials, specifications, 
estimating, and building design. 

A student majoring in electronics 
technology studies courses dealing with 
topics such as electron tubes, transisters, 
receivers, transmitters, microwaves, elec- 
trical machinery, plus circuits, servo- 
mechanisms, and analogue computers. 

A student majoring in mechanical 
technology studies statics, dynamics, 
fluid mechanics, kinematics, thermi- 
dynamics, internal combustion engines, 
machine design, and electricity. 

Building construction technicians are 
concerned with the erection and design 
of relatively large stationary structures 
and works. Some typical areas of con- 
centration for building construction 
are: structural design, architectural 
drafting, surveying, cost estimating and 
materials testing. 

Electronics technicians are concerned 
with designing, installing, and maintain- 
ing devices involving electron tubes or 
semiconductors. Some typical areas of 
concentration in which electronic tech- 
nicians are interested are: radar, sonar, 
digital computers, analogue computers, 
induction heating and television. 

Mechanical technicians are concerned 
with the design and operation of ma- 
chinery, mechanical devices, and 
processes involving heat. Some typical 
areas of concentration in this program 
are: materials testing, mechanical draft- 
ing, internal combustion engines and 
cyrogenics. 




Tharon Stevens, a graduate of Savan- 
nah State College, was the organist for 
the 45th Annual Meeting of the Georgia 
Teachers and Education Association. Mr. 
Stevens is an instructor at the William 
James High School of Statesboro, 
Georgia. 







Daniel Washington, President of the 
Savannah Chapter of the Savannah State 
College Alumni Association, greets mem- 
bers and visitors at the Annual Alumni 
Vespers held at the College. 




Mr. O. H. Brown, Public Relations Di- 
rector, Albany State College of Albany, 
Georgia, delivers annual Men's Festival 
Assembly Address at Savannah State 
College in Savannah, Georgia. 



IMPORTANT MESSAGE 

Dear Savannah State Alumnus: 

This is a message of utmost importance. It is your invitation to 
participate in the 1962-63 Scholarship-Membership Appeal of the 
Savannah State College Alumni Association. This year will be our 
greatest yet, if you want it to be. 

The significance of this year's Appeal and the importance of 
your participation are indicated in the following thoughts: 

1. This year must realize at least 1,000 participants and $10,000. 

2. Your gift is an investment in the future of higher education. 
All institutions of higher education must seek new financial 
resources to buttress their work. The best and most stalile 
source is through alumni contributions. By your will to give 
financial assistance, we can mold a greater S.S.C. 

3. Your gift helps qualify S.S.C. for Federal Grants. 

4. Your gift will help increase our number of student scholar- 
ships and will aid in many other needed institutional en- 
deavors. 

5. Your gift is the only official way to be identified as 'an active 
Alumnus. 

6. An Alumnus will always be identified by the reputation his 
or her Alma Mater has attained. It behooves us to make sure 
S.S.C. is always the best! 

7. We can never really repay our Alma Mater for what she has 
given us but we certainly can try. 

Won't you please take the time now to fill out the adjoining in- 
formation form and remit it and the enclosed check in the attached 
postage-paid envelope? Your check may be postdated if necessary. 
We are asking that your combined scholarship — membership dues 
be $10 for the entire year. After payment of this amount, you will 
not be called upon again this school year. In addition, you will re- 
ceive a receipt, and National membership cards, four issues of the 
Alumni Newsletter, privilege to vote and hold office in the local and 
National Associations and other services of the Alumni Office upon 
request. 

This school year promises to be the best yet. May we count on 
you to assist in making it so? 

Very sincerely yours, 

Daniel Washington 

Coordinator 

Robert Young 

Appeal Chairman 

Prince Mitchell 

Act. S.S.C. Alumni Sec. 




SSC Grad Heads 

New School 

Mrs. Sadie L. Cartledge, Principal of a staff 
of twenty-one teachers and 700 pupils, was 
transferred to a new 23 classroom structure 
this Spring. The school formerly Cloverdale, 
has been named J. H. C. Butler Elementary. 
The location of the school has made it one 
of the safest for pupils in Chatham County. 

Mrs. Cartledge is an alumna of S.S.C. She 
did graduate work at Atlanta University, and 
New York University. Prior to her appoint- 
ment by the Chatham County Board of Edu- 
cation, she taught in Jenkins and Liberty 
Counties. She is an active member of St. 
John Baptist Church and founder of the 
Classroom Teachers Organization in Chatham 
County in 1957. Other educational and civic 
organizations of which she is a member are: 
N.E.A., G.T.E.A., A.T.A., C.C.T.A., P. and S. 
Club, West Broad Street Y.M.C.A., and Zeta 
Phi Beta Sorority. 

Mrs. Cartledge is the wife of Blannie 
Cartledge, Sr. and the mother of two sons, 
Ernest Earl and Blannie, Jr. 



SSC Alumnus Is 
Athletic Director 

Jolly Stephens, Jr., I960 graduate of Sa- 
vannah State College with a degree in Health, 
Physical Education and Recreation is now 
serving as youth worker and Athletic Director 
at Bethlehem Community Center of Savannah, 
Georgia. Since working with the Center, Jolly 
has coached a semi-pro basketball team to a 
National Championship, winning over Frank 
Callen Boy's Club Jets 99-97 for the City 
Championship; the Dublin Hawks 99-67 for 
the State Championship; and Chattanooga, 
Tennessee 108-107 for the Nationals. 

In January of this year. Jolly was provided 
the opportunity of attending an institute for 
new workers in neighborhood and community 
centers, sponsored by the Hull House As- 
sociation and promoted by the National 
Federation of Settlement and Neighborhood 
Centers. This institute was held in Chicago. 

While attending Savannah State College, 
Jolly was a member of SSC's Football Team. 
He was the team captain of SSC's last con- 
ference championship in 1956. He also made 
"ALL SEAC" twice in a guard position. 

He is married to the former Jacquelyn 
Walker, a graduate of Savannah State College, 
presently employed with the Chatham County 
Board of Education. 



10 






SSC to Hold In-Service Institute in 
Chemistry for Secondary School Teachers 

The Savannah State College Chemistry Department announces an In-Service Institute in 
Chemistry for secondary school teachers of Chemistry and Ceneral Science to he sponsored from 
September 28, 1963 to June 6, 1964 by the National Science Foundation at the College. 

Prospective participants should hold a bachelor's degree, and be employed as a teacher of 
Chemistry or Ceneral Science (grades 7-12), and have taught and/or held bachelor's degrees for 
at least three years, and must also show apparent ability to secure sufficient benefits from the 
Institute. The following courses will be offered as listed: 

First Quarter 

Chemistry 200 — Physical laws of Chemistry (three quarter hours). This course concerns 
itself with laws that include matter and its structure, mass energy, the states of matter, solutions, 
homogeneous and heterogeneous equilibria, the periodic table, and inorganic nomenclature. 
Laboratory experiments and problems that illustrate the application of these laws are stressed. 

Second Quarter 

Chemistry 201 — The Fundamentals of Chemical Reaction (three quarter hours). Attention 
is given to inert gases, electrons and chemical reactions, ionic and covalent compounds, elec- 
trolysis, electrical energy and. chemical reaction, acids and bases in agireous systems, oxidation- 
reduction reactions, and inorganic nomenclature and classification. Laboratory experiments and 
problems that illustrate these principles are stressed. 

Third Quarter 

Chemistry 202 — Selected Topics (three quarter hours). This course deals with metals and 
metallurgy, nuclear chemistry, organic chemistry (nomenclature and classification), polymeriza- 
tion, rubber and plastics, carbohydrates, fats and proteins, colloids. Problems and laboratory 
experiments related to the course work are emphasized. 

The objectives of the institute shall be: 

1. To offer to science teachers, within a radius of approximately 50-75 miles of Savannah 
State College, fundamental courses in Chemistry. 

2. To increase the teacher's capacity to motivate students into science careers. 

3. To create in the high school teacher a greater awareness of and appreciation for the 
work of prominent scientists. This will also serve as a means of stimulation and 
enthusiasm. 

4. To help fill out a void in the teachers' backgrounds, in subject matter, so that they 
may begin an advanced degree program, at some graduate school without having so many 
undergraduate prerequisites to take. 

What Does Savannah State College Mean to Me? 

By JULIA ELAINE CHEELY 

As a senior of Savannah State College, looking forward to graduation in June, I pause 
momentarily to take a mental inventory of what Savannah State College really means to me. 

First of all, however. Savannah State College is located on the immediate outskirts of 
Georgia's oldest, and one of the most interesting cities of the Southeastern United States. The 
beautiful campus and its ideal location, not too close yet not too far from the city, is a pleasant 
combination of the tranquility of country life and the modern conveniences of city life. Savannah 
State College and its surroundings, therefore, mean an atmosphere conducive to learning. 

Another factor that means much to me as a student of Savannah State, is the large number 
of divisions and departments which make up the College Curricula. This number of divisions, 
departments, and courses offered makes it easy for one to select a major or a minor course 
of study to best prepare him for his chosen goal in life. 

After reviewing the records, achievements, and present positions of some of the Savannah 
State College graduates while compiling this bulletin, I can say that the worth of the College 
is highly represented by its products, the Savannah State College Alumni. 

What Savannah State College means to me can very well be summarized in the following 
lines: 

S.S.C., your name is more than just three words to me 
I can never forget, the happy days spent ; 
In this haven so close to the sea. 

Through your halls, have I wandered long in Winter 
Spring and Fall ; 

Greater knowledge to find, to hold and to bind, 
me still closer to your precious walls. 

I will go on from here to higher plains, 
That's what I'm striving for; 
But your memory will always remain 
In my heart like a shining star. 

Guide me on as I go from here to other lands 
unknown, through long future years; 
Through smiles and through tears; 
I'll remember the moments spent here. 







Mobley Presented 
Original Play 

Mr. Leroy Mobley, a graduate of Sa- 
vannah State College and English in- 
structor at the D. F. Douglas High 
School. Montezuma. Georgia, wrote and 
directed a three-act play entitled "Set 
On Edge" at the School. 

Mr. Mobley completed his high school 
studies at Vienna High School. Vienna, 
Georgia before entering Savannah State 
College. After he was graduated from 
Savannah Stale, he worked as an Eng- 
lish instructor at the Vienna High 
School until he was called into military 
services. 

During his stay in the army, he taught 
English as a foreign language in Puerto 
Rico. This is his first year at the D. F. 
Douglas High School. 

The title for the play was taken from 
one of the Old Testament prophets, 
Ezekiel 18:2 .. . For the fathers have 
eaten sour grapes and the children's 
teeth are "Set On Edge." 

The members of the cast were: Mollie 
Rucker. Ellabelle Salmon, Eula Flowers, 
Henry J. Ladd. Jr., William Brigges and 
Alfred Harwick. Stage and property 
managers were L. W. Duncan and 
Walter McCray. 

Mr. Mobley is the husband of Mrs. 
Nell C. Mobley, who is a senior at 
Savannah State College majoring in 
Biology. They have one son, Andre, four 
years old. 



11 



Directory of Alumni Chapters 



Albany, Georgia. . . . 


Mr 


Athens, Georgia .... 


Mr. 


Atlanta, Georgia .... 


Mr. 


Augusta, Georgia . . 


Miss 


Claxton, Georgia 


Mr. 


Columbus, Georgia 


Mr. 


Dublin. Georgia. . . . 


Mr. 


Griffin, Georgia .... 


Mr. 


Homerville, Georgia 


Mr. 


Jesup. Georgia 


Mr. 


Macon, Georgia . ... 


Mr. 


Madison. Georgia 


Mr. 


Mcintosh, Georgia 


Mr. 


Reidsville, Georgia 


Mrs. 


Sandersville, Georgia 


Elnu 


Savannah, Georgia 


Mr. 


Statesboro, Georgia 


. Mrs. 


Valdosta, Georgia . 


Mr. 


Washington, D. C. 


Mrs. 


Waynesboro, Georgia 


Mr. 



Benjamin Graham '55 Albany State College 

Willie H. McBride '49 248 Plaza 

Arthur Richardson '40 Samuel Archer High 

Ethel Mack 1211 Tenth Street 

Charles L. Bailey '53 7 Long Street 

Charles DuVaul '26 Spencer High School 

Timothy Ryals '54 Oconee High School 

L. L. Banks '43 . 502 North Sixth Street 

E. T. Whitaker '37 Homerville High and Elementary 

Arthur Williams '49 Wayne County Training School 

W. J. Sutton '48 ... .1601 Anthony Road 

Robert Jackson '55 Pearl Street High School 

Jesse Stevens Hineshaw Elementary School 

Josie Sessoms '36 Reidsville, Georgia 

s Williams Davisboro Academy 

James Luten '38 Sophronia Tompkins High 

Etheleen Talbert '48 2 Carver Street 

Isaiah Isom '58 Pinevale High School 

Ora M. Washington .3719 Kansas Avenue, N. W. 

R. E. Blakeney '31 Waynesboro High and Industrial 



Financing Faculty 
Salaries, a Problem 

Faculty salaries have been a perennial prob- 
lem on many campuses of the South. 

Mention these salaries to any alumnus of 
the region and you bring back for him images 
of professors in frayed shirt collars, antique 
automobiles and last decade's suits. 

The images may not be too far from -wrong, 
according to one group making a national sur- 
vey of education: 

"The plain fact is that the college teachers 
of the United States, through their inadequate 
salaries, are subsidizing the education of 
students, and in some cases the luxuries of 
their families, by an amount which is more 
than double the grand total of alumni gifts, 
corporate gifts, and endowment income of all 
colleges and universities combined." 

Four years ago the Southeastern region, 
paid the lowest salaries in the nation to both 
full professors and instructors. 

At that time Southern colleges and uni- 
versities paid their instructors some $394 less 
than the national average. Their full pro- 
fessors checks were more than $1,100 less 
than the national average. 

Today the Southeast still pays the lowest 
salaries for both ranks and the gap between 
national and regional average is even larger. 

Currently Southern instructors earn $619 
less than their counterparts in other regions 
and full professors earn $1,520 less than their 
counterparts. 

The growing gap doesn't mean that South- 
ern salaries stand still. In four years, instruc- 
tors salary levels have increased 19 per cent 
and full professors 26 per cent. The national 
increases were 22 per cent and 27 per cent. 

Because these salaries are still relatively 
low, the region loses its potential teaching 



power to other professions or to other parts 
of the country. 

A recent study made by the Fund for the 
Advancement of Education shows that fi- 
nancial rewards offered to educators by our 
society, as compared to those for other oc- 
cupational groups, decreased greatly from 1904 
to 1950. It is only during the last decade that 
action has been taken to correct this. 

For example, railroad conductors' "real" 
purchasing power increased 68 per cent dur- 
ing the years 1904-53, while that of pro- 
fessors at large state universities declined two 
per cent. Today a college professor earns only 
$621 a year (6 per cent) more than a rail- 
road conductor in spite of the difference in 
occupational preparation required by the two 
vocations. 

Universities also have a hard time compet- 
ing with industry in the market place for 
Ph.D.'s. The starting salary for jobs requiring 
a Ph.D. in industry is $8,500 to $10,000. At 
a university, starting jobs requiring a Ph.D. 
pay $5,000 to $7,000. 

Generally speaking, salaries for professors 
at private institutions in the South are lower 
than those in public institutions, but the 
private institutions made larger per cent in- 
creases between salaries of 1957-58, and 1961- 
62. A notable exception is Duke University 
which pays the highest salaries of any in- 
stitution, private or public in the region. 

For instance, salaries for professors in 
private institutions in Texas increased 47 per 
cent between 1957-58 and 1961-62, while the 
public increase was 21 per cent. In spite of 
the larger increase, however, professors aver- 
age $7,750 at a private institution and $8,630 
at a public institution. 

Salary is important in recruiting and hold- 
ing on to adequate faculty and staff for any 
university. The Commission on Goals for 
Higher Education in the South has said: 

"Institutions must attract and develop 
faculties of the highest caliber. To do this, 
faculty salaries in the Southern states must 
be made competitive with those in the -rest 
of the nation." 



* 








...'■■ 



SSC Tiger, Harvey Bailey, ready for 
action. 




SSC Tiger, Charles Day, measures 
distance to the goal. 







HH8 



James Carthon (74), and Calvin Rob- 
erts (51) are key men in the Savannah 
State offensive and defensive attack. 
Carthon is a senior and plays guard. He 
is from Thompson, Georgia. Calvin 
Roberts plays at the center position. 
He formerly played at Tompkins High 
in Savannah. Big "Chick" is captain of 
the '62 Tigers squad. 



12 



Robert A. Young, Chairman Big Gift 
Committee of Savannah Chapter 



Mr. Robert A. Young, Principal of Harris 
Area Trade School, Savannah, Georgia, is a 
graduate of Savannah State College. He is 
Chairman of the Big Gift Committee of the 
local chapter of the Savannah State College 
Alumni Association for 1963. 

Mr. Young received his high school diploma 
and a B.S. Degree from Savannah State Col- 
lege (then Georgia State College). He re- 
ceived the M.S. Degree from Cornell Uni- 
versity, Ithaca, New York. Some of the many 
prominent positions held by Mr. Young are: 
Principal of the Pin Point adult night school; 
Principal and Teacher of the Arlington Voca- 
tional High School, of Arlington, Georgia, and 
teacher of vocational agriculture at Haven 
Home School, Savannah, Georgia. He ad- 
vocated a community house for the Negroes of 
Montgomery, Georgia and spearheaded the 
campaign for funds. The .f 20,000 project was 
dedicated in 1949. 

Among his many honors and awards re- 
ceived are the following: The Delaware 
Trophy by the Savannah State College Alumni 
Association for outstanding services; the State 
Modern Farmers key by the Georgia Associa- 
tion of New Farmers of America; elected to 
Phi Delta Kappa Fraternity, an educational 
organization; elected Vice President of Theta 
Chapter, Phi Delta Kappa Fraternity, Cornell 
University; awarded certificate by the Chat- 
ham County Board of Education for efficient 
service; elected President of Chatham County 
Principals and Consultants Club; and is listed 
in Who's Who in American Education. 

Mr. Young is married and the father of 
three children. 



Kennedy C. Childers 
Area Supervisor 

Mr. Kennedy C. Childers, a native of States- 
boro, Georgia and a graduate of Savannah 
State College has been employed as Area 
Supervisor-Agricultural Extension Service of 
the College since 1950. 

Mr. Childers received the B.S. degree from 
Savannah State College and did post-graduate 
study at Prairie View A. & M. College, Prairie 
View, Texas. Before he was employed at the 
College, he worked as Superintendent and 
Principal of the Masonic Home School in 
Americus, Georgia and as Agricultural Exten- 
sion Agent of Burke County. 

He is married to Mrs. Eunice W. Childers 
and they are the parents of two children. 

Augustus Hill State Agent 

Mr. Augustus Hill is a graduate of Savan- 
nah State College and has been employed in 
the Agricultural Extension Service of the 
College as State Agent since 1959. 

Mr. Hill did his post graduate work at 
Pendle Hill Housing School in Wallingford, 
Pennsylvania and Prairie View A. & M. Col- 
lege, Prairie View, Texas. 

He is a member of Saint Matthews Epis- 
copal Church, Savannah, Georgia; Omega Psi 
Phi Fraternity; Frogs Inc.; and Mutual 
Benevolent Society, Inc. His civic activities 
include: YMCA, Boy Scouts, Men's Club, and 
the Community Improvement Club. 

Other positions that he held prior to his 
employment as State Agent are: Principal of 
Evans County Training School; NYA Project 
Coordinator, Albany State College; County- 
Agent, Grady County; Assistant State 4-H 
Club Agent and State Agent of Rural Housing. 




DeLoach Principal of New 
Scott Junior High School 

Robert Fulton DeLoach, Jr., a native Sa- 
vannahian and graduate of Savannah State 
College, is principal of the newly named 
Walter Scott Junior High School (formerly 
called Tompkins Junior High). Mr. DeLoach 
received the bachelor of Science Degree in 
Social Studies from Savannah State College, 
did graduate work at Atlanta University, 
Atlanta, Georgia, and received the masters 
degree in Administration from New York 
University, New York City. 

Before coming to Savannah to work, he was 
principal of the Mary McLeod Bethune High 
School in Folkston, Georgia. His first position 
in the Chatham County System was assistant 
principal, Sol C. Johnson High School. 

Mr. DeLoach is married and the father of 
three children. He is a member of the Butler 
Presbyterian Church where he serves as Presi- 
dent of the Men's Council. 




Eagie Scout, John Clemmons, Jr., presenting the "Guardian Award" to Dr. W. K. 
Payne, President of Savannah State College, for his contributions to the Chatham 
County Division of Boy Scouts of America. 



Peace Corps Volunteer Richard M. 
Coger, 22, a Savannah State College 
graduate, works as a teacher in British 
Honduras. A native of Pineland, South 
Carolina, Coger is one of 5,000 Volun- 
teers working overseas. Another 4,000 
Volunteers will enter training during the 
summer months for projects in 44 coun- 
tries. Persons interested in these projects 
should write the Peace Corps immedi- 
ately. 

SSC Alumnus Appeared on 
CBS Television Program 

THE DEFENDERS— "The Colossus" with 
Clifford Bryant of Savannah, Georgia and a 
graduate of Savannah State College appeared 
in the role of a Laboratory Assistant, in the 
Laboratory of a Scientist accused of murder- 
ing his wife. E. G. Marshall, Robert Reed, 
Leo Genn and others were shown on Saturday, 
April 13, at 8:30 P.M. on the CBS Television 
network. 



13 





Julia E. Cheely, a senior at Savannah State College and Editor of the Alumni 
Bulletin, points to the site of the new dormitory for women to be erected on the 
campus with ultra-modern facilities. 



"Tiger" SSC College Annual Dedicated to 
John B. Clemmons, Dept. Math and Physics 



The Savannah State College "Tiger," 
student annual, was dedicated to John 
B. Clemmons, Associate Professor and 
Head. Department Mathematics and 
Physics. He was presented the yearbook 
today at general assembly by Earnestine 
Adams, '63, Copy Writer for the annual. 
President William K. Payne received the 
first official copy as the "first citizen" 
of the College community. 

Mr. Clemmons is a native of Rome, 
Georgia. He received his B.S. degree 
from Morehouse College and the M.S. 
degree from Atlanta University. He has 
studied toward the Ph.D. in Mathe- 
matics for three years at the University 
of Southern California. This study has 
been under grants by the Ford Fellow- 
ship, Teaching Fellowship and the Na- 
tional Science Fellowship. Mr. Clem- 
mons is affiliated with the following or- 
ganizations: Beta Kappa Chi Honor So- 
ciety, Alpha Kappa Mu Honor Society, 
Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity, Alpha Phi 
Alpha Fraternity, Shriners, National 
Council of Teachers of Mathematics, 
Advisory Board of Carver Bank, Board 



of Directors of Golden Rule Insurance 
Company. 

He is a member of St. Phillips Church 
and teacher of Sunday School. Chair- 
man. Savannah State Credit Committee, 
Chairman. Boy Scouts Advancement 
Committee, Director of YMCA Players 
and listed in "Who's Who in Negro 
America." 

Mr. Clemmons is married to the for- 
mer Mozelle Dailey and the father of a 
son, John, Jr., and a daughter, Sheila. 



Mr. Ezekiel Walker. Special Sales 
Representative. Coca-Cola Bottling Com- 
pany, Savannah, Georgia, is a graduate 
of Savannah State College. 

Mr. Walker is a member of Saint 
Marys Catholic Church of Savannah 
and the Barron's Social Club. He is 
married to Mrs. Thelma Walker, also a 
graduate of Savannah State College and 
a teacher at Cuyler Junior High School 
in Savannah. They are the parents of 
two sons, Ezekiel, Jr., and Eric. 




Miss Doris Harris, Cashier, Business 
Office, Savannah State College, accept- 
ing fees from student registrant. Miss 
Harris is a 1956 graduate of the College. 




Mr. J. C. Reese, Principal, Center High 
School, Waycross, Georgia, speaks to 
Savannah State College student teachers 
during the Spring quarter of 1963. Mr. 
Reese is president of State Teachers Assn. 




Mrs. Betty Washington is the newest 
addition to the Bethlehem Community 
Center Staff. Mrs. Washington is a 
graduate of Savannah State College with 
a degree in Social Science. She is the 
Program Coordinator at the Center. 



14 



Hopkins Appointed 
Jury Commissioner 

T. J. Hopkins, a graduate of Savan- 
nah State College (Georgia State Col- 
lege), in the class of 1919. has been 
appointed jury commissioner for Chat- 
ham Count) and the City of Savannah. 
He is reported to be the first Negro ap- 
pointee in the recent history of Georgia. 




The duties of a commissioner are to 
select jurors for the Chatham County 
courts and to keep a record of jurors. 
Mr. Hopkins plans to make an attempt 
to equalize the number of jurors from 
each race. He is also a graduate of 
Howard University with a Bachelor of 
Science Degree in Electrical Engineer- 
ing. Here in Savannah, he has been an 
Electrical Engineer and Contractor since 
192o with the exception of three years 
and eight months spent in the Army. 

While he was with the Army Mr. Hop- 
kins served as Operation Officer for the 
369th Anti- Aircraft Artillery Group 
guarding Pearl Harbor in Hawaii. Com- 
mander of the 1st Battalion 1322 En- 
gineer G. S. Regiment, and Operation 
Officer for the 1312th Engineer G. S. 
Regiment on Luzon in the Philippine 
Islands. He is President of T. J. Hop- 
kins, Inc., Electrical Engineer-Contrac- 
tors, Savannah; Keeper of Finance of 
the Mu Phi Chapter. Omega Psi Phi 
Fraternity; a member of the Hub; 
Chairman of the Building and Property 
Committee of the Board of Managers 
for the West Broad Street YMCA; a 
member of the Executive Committee for 
the Project Sabre; a member of the City 
Advisory Committee on Savannah's 
Community Improvement Program and 
Urban Renewal Program; Vice Presi- 
dent of the Mid-Town Chamber of Com- 
merce and Vice President of Mid-Town 
Toastmaster's Club No. 3131-14. 




Ex-students of Savannah State College have been appointed as firemen for the 
City of Savannah. Savannah is the second city in Georgia to employ Negro firemen. 
Pictured above are: Purdy Bowens, Theodore Rivers, Louis Oliver, Porter Screen, 
Cordell Heath and Warnell Robinson. 




Former Savannah State College students employed as firemen for the City of 
Savannah. Porter Screen, Industrial Education major at the wheel of truck; Cordell 
Heath, Business major, in center; Louis Oliver, Industrial Education major; at the back 
of truck (left to right), Purdy Bowens, Mathematics major; Warnell Robinson, Education 
major; and Theodore Rivers, Mathematics major. 




Miss Carolyn Stafford Anderson, a graduate of Savannah State College and an 
Elementary Education major serves as secretary and assistant manager in the Savan- 
nah Relocation Office in the Department of Urban Renewal with Festus Bailey as 
Manager. 



15 




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Volume 4 — No. 1 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



September, 1962 



COLLEGE ANNOUNCES LATE AFTERNOON, EVENING, AND SATURDAY 
CLASSES FOR FRESHMEN, ADVANCED AND IN-SERVICE GROUPS 

£o p g e Z e Ha1 SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

will be held for late afternoon, 

evening, and Saturday classes at 
Savannah State College. Courses 
of special interest for qualified 
young and adult and area trade 
high school graduates, and for 
in-service and armed services 
personnel, will be offered. Be- 
ginning college courses in chem- 
istry, English, and German will 
be open on an experimental 
basis for selected high school 
seniors. Students who have 
dropped out of college to work 
and those planning to enter col- 
leges are eligible to apply. Be- 
cause Savannah State College is 
a fully accredited member of 
the Southern Association of Col- 
leges and Schools, courses satis- 
factorily completed here are 
transferable to other colleges of 
the region and the nation. 

During the fall quarter, upon 
sufficient demand the following 
courses will be offered: Inter- 
mediate Algebra; Cataloging and 
Classification (Library Science) ; 
General Inorganic Chemistry; 
Principles of Economics (College 
of the Air) ; Engineering Draw- 
ing; English Composition; Ele- 
mentary German; History of 
Western Culture; Introduction 
to Social Work. 

The class schedule may be ob- 
tained from the Registrar. 

Beginning September 24, 1962, 
an economics course, "The Amer- 
ican Economy," will be presented 
over the CBS television network. 
Learning Resources Institute is 
the sponsor. The program will 
appear on WTOC-TV from 7:00- 
7:30 a.m., Monday through Fri- 
day. The subject is a two se- 
mester course in seventeen parts 
and presented in 159 lessons. 

Discussion meetings will be 
held once a week on Friday 
nights, at an hour convenient to 
all concerned, on the campus of 
the college as the instructor may 
decide. Also, a two hour session 
will be held once a week or once 
every two weeks, as the persons 
(in-service teachers and local 
businessmen) with the instruc- 
tor may deem advisable. For 
persons who are not full time 
students, as if it were presented 
through correspondence, the 
length and frequency of meet- 
ings will be decided by the direc- 
tor of correspondence and, if he 
so desires, the instructor. 

The course, for persons who 
are enrolled as full time students 
and in-service teachers and local 
businessmen, will be handled by 
Dr. C. A. Christophe, and for 
persons who are not full time 
students as if it were presented 
through correspondence, will be 
handled by W. E. Griffin. 

Fall Quarter Schedule 

Wednesday, September 5, last 
day for filing admission applica- 
tions and paying admission and 
room deposits; 

Tuesday, September 11, last 
day for filing requests for refund 
of admission and room deposits; 
(Continued on Page 3) 




Shown above is Dr. Ezra Merritt (left), alumnus of the College, as he greets Dr. 
Payne in his office while visiting the campus recently. 

Dr. Merritt received the D.D.S. degree from Howard University in June, 1962. 

Dr. Merritt, a native Savannahian and an active student both socially and scholas- 
tically while attending Savannah State, visited the College recently and enjoyed a tour 
of his "dear ole Alma Mater," observing the many additions to the campus since his 
matriculation. 

Presently, Dr. Merritt is at Fort Sam Houston, Texas, where he is a dentist for the 
United States Army. 



Football Season 
Opens Sept. 29 

On Saturday, September 29, 
1962, Savannah State College 
Tigers invade Jacksonville, Flor- 
ida, for a football encounter 
against Edward Waters College. 

Returning to the gridiron this 
season are such good players as: 
Fred Carter, sophomore; 22; 6'2"; 
180 pounds, graduated from 
Gainesville High. Fred made all- 
conference his freshman year. 
Others are Oree Rawls, State's 
end from Center High School, 
Waycross, Georgia; Hershel Rob- 
inson, attended East Point High, 
Atlanta, Georgia; Thomas Wil- 
liams , sophomore, graduated 
from Stubensville High School. 

Tackles returning are: Ber- 
nard Lewis, 200 lb. sophomore, 
graduated from Stubensville 
High School; Bobby Lockett, 186 
lb. junior, and graduate of Bal- 
lard-Hudson High School, Ma- 
con, Georgia; and Gene Wilcher, 
200 lb. junior, graduated from 
Ballard-Hudson High School, 
Macon, Georgia. 

Guards are: James Carthon, 
who attended Drake High, 
Thomaston, Georgia; Willie 
Howard, sophomore, 165 lb. 
graduate of Tompkins High 



School; and George Johnson, 
junior, graduated from Jones 
High. 

In the swift moving backfield 
we have the following players 
returning: Connie Cater, at- 
tended Ballard - Hudson High, 
Macon, Georgia; Robert Saxby, 
sophomore, graduated from 
Tompkins High School; Leroy 
Major, 185 lb. junior; McArthur 
Pratt, 168 lb. graduate of North- 
western High School. Pratt will 
be in the hot spot, better known 
as quarterback. 

The team adopted the motto 
"Second to None" and Coach 
Washington and his players are 
determined to live up to it. 



College Offers Degree 
In Art Education 

The Department of Fine Arts 
at Savannah State announced 
recently that persons interested 
in earning a bachelor's degree in 
Art Education at Savannah 
State will have the opportunity 
to do so. As of now the College 
offers only a minor in art, but 
with the addition of several 
courses, the requirements for the 
degree can be completed in the 
normal four-year period. 

The new program was ap- 
proved in April of this year and 
will be in full swing beginning 
in September. The degree re- 
ceived by the persons who suc- 
cessfully complete all required 
courses will be the "Bachelor of 
Science in Fine Arts." Although 
the program is designed pri- 
marily for the education of arts 
teachers, it will include enough 
sufficiently sound courses to give 
the student enough skill and 
training to branch out into such 
lucrative fields as commercial 
art and advertising display. 

The recently - approved pro- 
gram will include an array of 
introductory courses, sculpture, 
painting, the graphic arts (in- 
cluding lithography and etch- 
ing), history of art and art edu- 
cation. 

Prof. Phillip J. Hampton of 
the department, optimistically 
expressed the view that with the 
necessary backing and finances 
"the college will have a tremen- 
dous program in art." 

Many students who are pres- 
ently minoring in art and ma- 
joring in some other area, pri- 
marily because no major was 
offered at the time of their en- 
rollment will probably change 
majors in September. Of course 
the classification of the students 
will determine the transfer since 
such a transfer might mean that 
graduation could be delayed. 

Savannah State will be one of 
the few state-supported schools 
to offer such a degree. It is be- 
lieved that outstanding exhibi- 
tion by some of the nation's top 
artists will be attracted to Sa- 
vannah because of this addition. 



FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 

Sept. 29 Ed. Waters Night There 

Oct. 6 Fort Valley Night Columbus 

Oct. 13 Morris College Day Savannah 

Oct. 20 Benedict Day Savannah 

Oct. 27 Albany State Night There 

Nov. 3 Alabama State Night There 

Nov. 10 "Clark Day Savannah 

Nov. 17 Claflin Day There 

Nov. 22 **Paine Day Savannah 

* Homecoming. 
** Thanksgiving. 
All home games will be played on the College Athletic Field. 



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Page 2 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



September, 1962 



The Savannah State College Alumni Newsletter 

The Savannah State College Newsletter is published quarterly 
by Savannah State College through the Office of Public Relations. 

Dr. William K. Payne President 

Dr. E. K. Williams Director of Summer School 

Wilton C. Scott, Director of Public Relations Technical Adviser 

Prince Jackson, Jr., '49 Editor (on leave) 

Lillie Allen Powell, '58 Associate Editor 

Rosemary Singleton, '61 Associate Editor 

Robert Mobley Photographer 

PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE 

One hears much about the growth and expansion of colleges 
today. Colleges register aspects of growth in many ways at the 
same time. Growth in some institutions has been noted in the 
movement from junior college to senior college, from undergraduate 
to graduate programs, from one degree program to a number of 
programs, from small enrollments to large enrollments, and from 
lower academic standards to higher standards. In other instances 
concepts of growth have been identified with enlargement and 
improvement of the physical plants and instructional facilities, 
achievement of the graduates of the college, and training and 
quality of the faculties. 

Another index always considered by evaluating agencies is that 
of the alumni. The term alumni suggests many more things than 
the names of individuals who have received degrees from a college. 
The idea includes the organization of those individuals who have a 
feeling of concern for their respective colleges, its welfare, and its 
perpetuity. The alumni of many outstanding colleges and universi- 
ties play significant roles in the growth and development of the 
various phases of our colleges. While some colleges can boast of 
wealthy and influential alumni, others can be proud of the loyalty 
and support of the majority of their graduates. 

Savannah State College is glad to include the growth of alumni 
in its progress. The list of graduates who hold a feeling of belong- 
ing increases every month. In recent years, the alumni have de- 
veloped a scholarship program to help meet mounting requests for 
financial needs of students. In other ways the alumni have been 
instrumental in the discovery and identification of promising stu- 
dents. Their interests in a strong faculty and adequate physical 
facilities have been evidenced in a number of ways. 

Every business or institution realizes that numbers are impor- 
tant. If each graduate or former student becomes an active member 
of the alumni association, wonders can be accomplished. The par- 
ticipation of every alumnus is important. Many alumni now active 
can help bring others into the left stream of the association by 
making personal contacts. It is amazing what can be done when 
many individuals make small or modest contributions to the pro- 
gram of the alumni association. 

Savannah State College is striving to upgrade its college library. 
The new library building is one of the outstanding improvements 
on the campus. Although great progress has been made in adding 
books and periodicals each year since 1958, increased results are 
required each year to keep pace with the academic program. One 
book a year from every alumnus would add several thousand vol- 
umes annually to the collection. Instead of adding 3,000 - 4,000 
volumes, the College would be able to add 5,000 - 6,000 books each 
year. The College hopes to have 60,000 volumes in the library by 
1966. To do this, alumni, faculty, friends, and students must double 
their efforts. 

7 State Colleges Get U. S. Housing Loans 

WASHINGTON— College housing loans totaling $3,538,000 will be 
made available to seven schools in Georgia, the state's two senators 
were told by the Community Facilities Administration Wednesday. 
The seven colleges and the amounts of the loans are: 
Woman's College of Georgia, $396,000; Valdosta State College, 
$660,000; Georgia Southwestern, $532,000; West Georgia, $792,000; 
South Georgia, $495,000; Fort Valley State $300,000, and Savannah 
State, $330,000. 

Directory of Savannah State National Alumni Officers 



W. H. McBride, '49, President 
284 Plaza 
Athens, Georgia 

Mrs. Josie B. Sessoms, '36, 

Vice President 
Tattnall County High and 

Industrial School 
Reidsville, Georgia 

Mrs. Marie B. Martin, '46, 

Recording Secretary 
William James High School 
Statesboro, Georgia 



Mrs. Ester S. Bryant, 59, 

Corresponding Secretary 

1017 West 37th Street 

Savannah, Georgia 
Prince Mitchell, '57, Treasurer 

Savannah State College 

Savannah, Georgia 
Prince Jackson, Jr., '49, Reporter 

Savannah State College 

Savannah, Georgia 
Rev. J. E. Bailey, '17, Chaplain 

604 Waters Avenue 

Savannah, Georgia 



Dr. Samuel P. Massie 

Commencement Speaker 

"Now that you have become a 
man you must put away childish 
things," said Dr. Samuel P. Mas- 
sie, assistant director, National 
Science Foundation, Washing- 
ton, D. C, as he addressed the 
graduates at the Eighty-eighth 
Commencement held 11:00 a.m., 
August 15, Meldrim Auditorium, 
Savannah State College. 




Dr. Massie continued by say- 
ing, "In this world today, you 
cannot afford to pick up your 
marbles and go home. The 
world demands men and women 
to perform well the tasks they 
set to do. You should have an 
unquenchable thirst for knowl- 
edge. All of you can learn some- 
thing from everyone. Every ex- 
perience must teach you some- 
thing. 

The speaker welcomed the 
graduates to join the company 
of scholars. He emphasized the 
point that the world needs great 
leaders and people with great 
hearts. He admonished the grad- 
uates that they must make the 
first move if they are to pitch 
their stakes high in life. 

In closing Dr. Massie stated, 
"You must believe in God. You 
must have faith and you must 
be willing to do your best al- 
ways. You must have great 
minds and great hearts and 
faith in others. Welcome to the 
company of men. Go forth to 
do and excel." 




Rev. Herbert Turner delivers Baccalau- 
reate sermon to August graduates. 

College Student 
Financial Aid Program 

The demands on the limited 
funds for student financial aid 
in an institution as large as Sa- 
vannah State College are neces- 
sarily heavy. Therefore, financial 
aid can be granted only to those 
students of sound moral char- 
acter who are doing highly 
creditable work in high school 
or in the college and who can- 
not continue their education 
without some type of financial 
aid. 

There are certain basic princi- 
ples that should guide the 
philosophy of any sound stu- 
dent financial aid program. The 
following statement of principles 
guiding the administration of 
the Financial Aid Program at 
this institution is presented to 
help school Counselors, parents, 
and students better understand 
the goals of the Financial Aid 
Program: 

1. The primary purpose of the 
Financial Aid Program is to pro- 
vide financial assistance to stu- 
dents who, without such aid, 
would be unable to attend col- 
lege. 

2. The Financial Aid Program 
is designed to strengthen and 
improve the quality of the stu- 
dent body. Therefore, the Col- 
lege makes every effort and co- 
operates with other schools to 
encourage college attendance by 
all deserving and qualified stu- 
dents. 

(Continued on Page 5) 




Faculty being led to commencement exercises by Prince Jackson, senior advisor. 



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September, 1962 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



Page 3 



Dr. Clyde Hall 
Heads Industrial 
Workshop 

Dr. Clyde Hall, director of the 
Technical Division and alumnus 
of this College, is head of the 
course entitled, "Industrial Edu- 
cation Curriculum," a three week 
course which began July 23. Ten 
other teachers of Trade and In- 
dustrial Courses at Vocational 
and Technical Schools in Geor- 
gia participated in the Work- 
shop. 

The Workshop covers the In- 
dustrial Education Curriculum 
which included teachers in the 
fields of Practical Nursing, Cos- 
metology Drafting, Electricity, 
and Repairs, Body and Fender 
Work, Upholstering and Interior 
Decorating and Masonry. 

The other participants were 
Mrs. Marian Parker, Harris Area 
Trade School, Savannah; Mrs. 
Sadye B. Hutchinson, Carver 
Vocational School, Atlanta; Mrs. 
Marion Crowder, Mr. John 
Wynne, Mr. Claude T. Parsons, 
Mr. Clarence H. Smith, all of 
Muscogee Area Vocational and 
Technical School, Columbus; 
Mrs. Anna Washington, Mr. Na- 
thaniel Cross, Mr. Solomon E. 
Shurney, and Mr. Willie L. Em- 
erson, all of Albany, Georgia. 



p wm 



John Camper Passes 
California State Exam 

John Camper, who was an In- 
structor in the Department of 
Education for eight years at Sa- 
vannah State, has recently 
passed the state examination 
for academic supervisor. He was 
the only Negro to pass the exam- 
ination and if he receives the 
appointment, will be the first of 
his race to serve as such. 

Mr. Camper has made excel- 
lent progress since being in 
California, having recently end- 
ed a term as President of the 
California State Employed 
Teachers' Association; he is now 
on the Board of Directors. In 
addition to this Mr. Camper is 
a member of the Teachers Com- 
mittee of the California State 
Employees Association, being the 
only Negro with such distinction. 

Mr. Camper is presently writ- 
ing a manual for teachers of the 
socially maladjusted student. 

Mr. Camper is married and 
has two daughters, Renee and 
Terri. 



(Continued from Page 1) 

Sunday, September 16, Orien- 
tation week begins; 

Monday, September 17, Place- 
ment examinations: 8:30 a.m.- 
4:30 p.m.; 

Tuesday, September 18, Physi- 
cal examinations, entering stu- 
dents; 

Thursday, September 20, 
Physical examinations, continu- 
ing students; 

Friday, September 21, Regis- 
tration for continuing students; 

Monday, September 24, Classes 
begin; 

Monday, September 24, Regis- 
tration with payment of late fee; 

Tuesday, September 25, last 
day for registration with pay- 
ment of late fee; 

Tuesday, September 25, last 
day for adding courses. 




Dr. Charles Pratt, Chemistry Instructor, shows SSC's alumnus Dr. James Densler and 
his charming wife experiments in research of cottonseed flavornoids. 

Dr. Densler and his very lovely wife, Mable, visited the College recently and were 
escorted around the Campus by Wilton C. Scott, Director of Public Relations. 

Dr. Densler, an Alumnus of the College, marveled at the newly acquired buildings, 
laboratories and other additions to the campus since his attendance here from 1950-54. 

A 1961 graduate of Meharry Medical College, Knoxville, Tennessee, Dr. Densler 
completed his internship in June of 1962 and has been appointed to the staff of the 
United States Public Service Hospital in Staten Island, New York, beginning September. 

Mrs. Densler is a registered nurse, having graduated from Meharry School of Nursing 
in 1961. 




President and Mrs. W. K. Payne greet August graduates at the President's house. 




Trade and Industrial Education Teachers attending the Annual Summer Courses 
held at College's Library in August. 



Six- Week Summer 
Session Ends 

By Elmer Thomas 

The Science Workshop at Sa- 
vannah State held its open house 
on Thursday, July 19th, and fea- 
tured outstanding exhibitions by 
school teachers enrolled in the 
workshop. 

Those viewing the exhibits 
could watch a volcano's eruption 
step-by-step, examine the in- 
ner-workings of atoms close-up, 
and see for themslves the "oxy- 
gen-carbon dioxide cycle" in ac- 
tion. These models, demonstrat- 
ing various scientific principles, 
were designed and constructed 
by teachers enrolled in the 
course. Another interesting ex- 
hibit was an electric question- 
and-answer board. By touching 
a wire to a particular coded 
question, and at the same time 
touching the correct answer, the 
electrical circuit was completed 
and an indicator light came on. 
There were numerous other ex- 
hibits and gadgets on display. 

The Workshop on Materials 
and Methods in the Elementary 
and Secondary Schools was pri- 
marily concerned with new tech- 
niques and methods of teaching 
in the public schools. The work- 
shop was divided into four sub- 
groups. Each was concerned with 
problems in the country's edu- 
cational institutions. Each group 
was headed by a staff advisor 
from SSC. One advisor, Mr. R. J. 
Martin, is principal of Ballard- 
Hudson High School, Macon, 
Georgia. 

"Group One" presented a sim- 
ulated court case entitled "A Day 
in Court" as part of the culmi- 
nating activity of the workshop. 
In this satirical skit, the use of 
current trends in education 
against modern methods is de- 
plored. 

"Group Two" decided to utilize 
their imaginations in the form 
of an original skit. The skit re- 
volves around an instructor's 
creative method of teaching a 
unit on the business letter. The 
high points are brought out 
when representatives of all areas 
of the community are brought 
in on the act. Through this skit, 
the group sets forth one of its 
fundamental findings, that "the 
individual must learn through 
the whole environment." 

"Group Three" presented a skit 
in line with their theme, 
"Strengthening Education for 
Our Children." 

The fourth division was con- 
cerned with three areas: School 
and Community Relations; Ex- 
tra Class Activities and Guid- 
ance. The group has done ex- 
tensive work in exploring these 
areas by pin-pointing problems 
pertinent to in-service teachers. 
Through research, discussion 
and exploration of periodicals, 
the group has considered these 
areas and have submitted verbal 
and written reports in the areas 
of social studies, music, physical 
education, guidance and ele- 
mentary education. 



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Page 4 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



September. 1962 



Reading Workshop 
Conducted at SSC 

On July 10, nine in-service 
teachers and one prospective 
teacher completed a six week 
period of participation in a 
Reading Workshop conducted as 
a part of the Savannah State 
College summer program. This 
workshop was organized to pro- 
vide an opportunity for teach- 
ers to work cooperatively on 
common problems in the Teach- 
ing of reading. During the ses- 
sion, workshop members from 
all instructional levels worked 
in an informal atmosphere on 
areas which they considered im- 
portant to them. 

Using the theme "Improving 
the Reading — Learning Process," 
the group investigated (1) the 
nature and function of reading, 
(2) objectives for a good reading 
program, (3) diagnosis of read- 
ing disabilities, (4) grouping for 
reading instruction, (5) helping 
the slow learner in the regular 
class, and (6) teaching the de- 
velopmental reading lesson. 

Robert Holt, Director of the 
Reading Center at the College, 
was workshop director, and Mrs. 
Louise Owens, Assistant Profes- 
sor of English, and Mrs. Mary 
Cleveland, assistant librarian, 
were consultants. 



Methods-Materials 

Workshop Offered 

The workshop enrolled 42 
members during the recently 
completed session. Participants 
represented systems from many 
and varied sections of the state 
and a few from our neighboring 
state of South Carolina. 

The first few days were spent 
identifying workshoppers' prob- 
lems and concerns. These con- 
cerns formed the basis for study 
for the session. When it was felt 
that the primary concerns had 
been elicited from the general 
group, subgroups were formed 
for the purpose of intensive 
study and analysis of the prob- 
lem areas. Participants selected 
subgroups according to their 
own interest. 

A master schedule was ar- 
ranged which provided regular 
sharing sessions during which 
subgroups presented significant 
findings to the general group. 
Each subgroup made two such 
presentations. 

To aid in analysis of the prob- 
lem areas a fairly extensive 
library was maintained on the 
premises, the materials of which 
were acquired from the institu- 
tional collection and from the 
library facilities of the State De- 
partment of Education. Numer- 
ous films were used and a va- 
riety of consultants came to us. 
A full time demonstration class 
was also maintained. 

In addition to the serious study 
the Workshop engaged in some 
social affairs. One of these was 
an evening social at a local re- 
sort and the second was an all 
day field trip to the beach. 

As a culminating activity, the 
Workshop assembled the basis 
and significant findings in at- 
tractive compiled form, provid- 
ing a copy for each participant. 

A final evaluation by the 
Workshoppers indicated the 
general feeling that the experi- 
ence was very worthwhile. 




Dr. Irene Ighodaro 
Visits SSC 

Dr. Irene Ighodaro of Ibadan, 
Nigeria, was a recent visitor to 
the state of Georgia through the 
sponsorship of the Agricultural 
Extension Service. While here, 
her special interests included 
hospitals, private and public 
welfare agencies and health 
services, clinics and the over-all 
activities of American women. 
She visited Charity Hospital, the 
College Infirmary, Chatham 
County Nursing Home and Mills 
Memorial Home for the Aged. 



Electronics workshop conducted by Philco Corporation. 




IBM Card Punch— Students and instructor. Miss Albertha E. Boston, fourth from right, 
observe Mr. George Miller, Bookkeeper, SSC, operate the IBM Card Punch. These persons 
are enrolled in the special course in Office Machines which emphasizes the card punch. 




Shown above in the office of 
the President, left to right: Dr. 
Ighodaro, Mrs. Mattie T. Cope- 
land, Mrs. Anne J. Postell (both 
Area Supervisors with the Exten- 
sion Service) and Dr. W. K. 
Payne, Savannah State College 
President. 



Left to right: Miss Melbo Wright, instructor, McDuffie County Training School; Mr. 
Nathaniel Cross, instructor, Albany Area Trade School, Albany, Georgia; Mrs. Alethia 
Harris, President's Secretary, SSC, and Miss Freddie M. Williams, Bookstore Manager, 
SSC, take dictation from the tape recorder on the Stenograph— shorthand machine. 




Educational TV Workshop conducted under the supervision of Mrs. Ida J. Gadsde 
and WSAV-TV. 



Six Weeks Art 
Course Held 

The six weeks course in Art 
Education 402, Advanced Public 
School Art, terminated its ac- 
tivities by presenting an art ex- 
hibit and puppet show. The lat- 
ter proved to be so popular that 
it was presented for a second 
showing. Many members of the 
Savannah and Thunderbolt com- 
munities were present and ex- 
pressed their delight. 

The puppet show was designed 
and executed by Annie Moffitt, 
Marie Pollen and Betty White. 
It, of course, was originally in- 
tended as a project which might 
be experienced by a group of 
elementary school children. The 
subject of the puppet show was 
selected from the ever popular 
story of the "Three Little Pigs." 
However, the three makers of 
the show, having learned in ear- 
lier art classes that creativity 
can and should be applied to as 
many aspects of a situation as 
possible, elected to alter the 
original story. 

"The Three Little Pigs" were 
presented as "Beatniks," thus 
becoming a brief study in social 
behavior differences of our con- 
temporary society. The unique 
story ended at its climax, where- 
upon the smart little pig and 
the voracious wolf became 
friends — a switch, indeed. The 
moral of this story could be- 
perhaps — that pigs and wolves 
should be friends. 



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September, 1962 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



Page 5 



ABOUT OUR ALUMNI 



Sherman Koberson, Alumnus 
of Savannah State College, has 
recently been appointed as an 
analytical Chemist for the Food 
and Drug Administration in De- 
troit, Michigan. With a rating 
of GS7, his annual salary will 
be $6,245. 

While attending Savannah 
State, Sherman, a 1960 gradu- 
ate, was well known among the 
campus family as well as the Sa- 
vannah community for his ac- 
tive participation in social, po- 
litical and community projects. 
Known by some as "Little Cas- 
tro," he was recognized for his 
straight - forwardness and his 
exuberant leadership abilities. 

Among his activities on 
campus, Sherman served as 
Editor-in-Chief of the Student 
Newspaper ("The Tiger's Roar"), 
a member of Alpha Phi Alpha 
Fraternity, Pan Hellenic Council, 
Boar's Head Club, College Play- 
house and in 1959 served as a 
student representative partici- 
pant in the Second Student 
Human Relations Seminar, Na- 
tional Student Congress, and 
Operation Friendship in Havana, 
Cuba. While participating he was 
active in discussion group panels 
and case studies concerning the 
improvement of Human Rela- 
tions in the South. He also co- 
authored a phamplet entitled, 
Programming For Leadership In 
Predominantly Negro Institu- 
tions. 

Since graduating, Mr. Rober- 
son has been working as an 
assistant biochemist at the Edsel 
B. Ford Institute for Medical 
Research of the Henry Ford 
Hospital in Detroit. He was also 
a graduate student in chemistry 
at Wayne University. 

Richard Mondell Coger, a re- 
cent graduate of Savannah State 
College is the first SSC student 
to be selected for the United 
States Peace Corps. He is pres- 
ently at the University of Mary- 
land. Following three months 
training at the University, he 
will go to the British Hondorus 
for assignment around October, 
1962. 

Coger was among the first 
three to take examinations for 
the Peace Corps in the Savannah 
Area. The examinations were 
administered for the first time 
in Savannah last year. 

A June '62 graduate, Coger 
received the B.S. Degree in In- 
dustrial Arts. While in attend- 
ance here he was active in the 
political, social and cultural ac- 
tivities of the campus com- 
munity being a member of the 
UMCA, Phi Beta Sigma Fra- 
ternity, Industrial Arts Club, 
"Tiger's Roar" (student news- 
paper) staff, College Playhouse, 
and Debating Team. He was also 
a candidate for "Man of the 
Year" and a candidate for Stu- 
dent Council President. 

Coger is a native of South 
Carolina. 

First Lieutenant Arthur L. 
Johnson, a native of Adel, Geor- 
gia, arrived in the Philippine 
Islands recently to report for 
duty with a Pacific Air Forces 
Unit. 

Lieutenant Johnson, a clinical 
laboratory officer, is a graduate 
of Savannah State and a mem- 
ber of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity. 



He and his wife, the former 
Rosetta C. Brown, have two chil- 
dren, Arthur, Jr. and Debra. 

Alphonso Orr, Savannah State 
College Alumnus and resident of 
White Plains, New York, was 
awarded a doctorate in physi- 
ology at the commencement 
exercises of St. John's Univer- 
sity, recently. Dr. Orr earned his 
degree in physiology in four 
faculties, biochemistry, hemat- 
ology, endocrinology and neuro- 
physiology. 

For the past ten years, Dr. 
Orr has been a research scientist 
at the Creedmore Institute for 
Psycho-Biologic studies in 
Queens Village. He is senior re- 
search scientist now and is in 
charge of the physiology labor- 
atories there. He has concur- 
rently worked as a research 
scientist at the New York 
Medical College in the city, and 
will become a visiting teacher at 
the College in September. 

Dr. Orr is a native Savan- 
nahian and received the B.S. 
degree at Savannah State. He 
earned the MA. degree at New 
York University and the M.S. 
degree at Fordham. 

He has authored 14 scientific 
publications in his field of refer- 
ence, and is a member of the 
exclusive Sigma Pxi, an honorary 
fraternity. He is a member of 
the New York Academy of 
Sciences, as well as the Ameri- 
can Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science. He is also the 
chairman of the scholarship 
committee of the Westchester 
Clubmen, Inc. 

Dr. Orr is married to the 
former Dorothy James who is 
director of Child Guidance 
Services. 

Wade Simmons, '53, has been 
appointed as principal of the 
Fell-Jackson School which will 
be located in the Francis Bartow 
area. The school is slated to be 
completed in December. 

Prior to this appointment, Mr. 
Simmons has taught six years 
at the George DeRenne Ele- 
mentary School teaching 6th 
and 7th graders; Assistant Prin- 
cipal at Sol C. Johnson School 
and last year was acting princi- 
pal at the Paulsen Elementary 
School. 

While in attendance here at 
the College Mr. Simmons helped 
organize and was the first presi- 
dent of the Newman Club, was 
active in dramatics and was a 
member of the College Chapter 
of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity. 

Receiving his master's degree 
in the summer of 1960, from the 
Columbia University Teacher's 
College, Mr. Simmons has done 
additional study at the same 
University. 

The versatile Mr. Simmons 
further exhibits his leadership 
by his affiliations which include 
membership at St. Benedict's 
Catholic Church and the Holy 
Name Society of that Church, 
the Falcons and Alpha Phi Alpha 
Fraternity. 

His professional affiliations 
include the NEA, T&EA, ATA, 
and the Principals and Super- 
visors Club. 

Robert A. Robbins, Class of 
1960, has recently been employed 




Dr. C. A. Braithwaite Training Summer Choir. 



by the United States Air Force 
Aeronautical Chart and In- 
formation Center. He is enrolled 
in the Cartographer Training 
Program being conducted at 
ACIC'c training school in St. 
Louis, Missouri. 

This six month Civil Service 
Commission approved course 
provides a broad background in 
chart compilation and related 
fields. Subjects covered in the 
cirriculum include Geodesy 
(exact measurement of the 
earth), Astronomy, Physical 
Geography and Photogrammetry 
(making charts from photo- 
graphs). 

When Robert completes the 
course, he will be assigned to the 
Production and Distribution 
Plant of ACIC located in St. 
Louis, Misouri, at the historic 
site of the St. Louis Arsenal on 
Second and Arsenal Streets. 

Its mission is basically the pro- 
duction of aeronautical charts, 
graphic air target materials, 
flight information publications, 
maps, terrain models, evaluated 
intelligence on air facilities and 
related cartographic devices for 
the United States Air Force and 
other Department of Defense 
agencies. 

(Continued from Page 2) 

3. The Financial Aid Program 
consists of scholarships, grants- 
in-aid, loans, and part-time stu- 
dent employment (work-aid) 
which may be offered to stu- 
dents singly or in various com- 
binations. 

4. The Financial Aid Program 
is designed to only supplement 
the efforts of the family. The 
family of a student is expected 
to make a maximum effort to 
assist the student with college 
expenses. 

5. In selecting needy and de- 
serving students to receive fi- 
nancial assistance, the Financial 
Aid Program places primary 
emphasis upon academic 
achievement, character, and 
future promise. 

6. In determining the extent 
of student's financial need, the 
Financial Aid Program takes 
into account the financial sup- 
port which may be expected 
from the income, assets, and 
other resources of the parents 
and the student. 

7. In estimating the amount 
that a student's family can pro- 
vide for college expenses, the 
Financial Aid Program considers 
the factors that affect a family's 
financial strength: current in- 
come, assets, debts, number of 



Electronics Workshop 

The Division of Technical 
Sciences of Savannah State Col- 
lege in cooperation with the 
Georgia State Division of Voca- 
tional Education offered an 
Electronics Workshop for in- 
service teachers of electnorics. 
This workshop was conducted by 
the Philco Corporation, using 
the TechRep System and Equip- 
ment for the teaching of post 
high school electronics. Mr. 
Leslie Rousseau of the Philco 
Headquarters Instructor Staff 
supervised this experience. 

Classes were held in the elec- 
tronics laboratory of the Tech- 
nical Center of the College 8 
hours a day 5 days per week for 
3 weeks, and each participant 
had ample time to familiarize 
himself with the Philco ap- 
proach to teaching. 

Participants came from Geor- 
gia as well as adjoining states. 



dependents, and other educa- 
tional expenses. 

8. The Financial Aid Program 
expects a student who needs fi- 
nancial assistance to make every 
possible effort to provide a rea- 
sonable part of the total amount 
required to meet his college ex- 
penses. 

9. The College reviews its fi- 
nancial assistance awards 
annually and adjust them, if 
necessary, in type and amount 
to reflect changes in the fi- 
nancial needs of students and 
the cost of attending Savannah 
State College. 

10. The Financial Aid Program 
is centralized. Therefore, a com- 
mittee has been appointed to 
administer the entire student 
financial aid program at Savan- 
nah State College. 

The student Financial Aid 
Program at Savannah State Col- 
lege is designed for the needy 
and deserving student and only 
those students in these cate- 
gories are selected. By cooper- 
ating with high school Princi- 
pals, Counselors, Administrators, 
and other interested individuals, 
Savannah State College selects 
the most needy and deserving 
students to benefit from the 
Financial Aid Program. Students 
wishing to apply for any par- 
ticular type of financial Aid 
may secure application blanks 
by contacting the following: 
Committee on Scholarships, 
Grants-in-Aid, and Loans 
Savannah State College 
State College Branch 
Savannah, Georgia. 



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Page 6 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



September, 1962 




In-Service Teachers Studying "School Library Materials." 




r^ 



A view of Trades and Industrial Education workshop. 




Dr. H. S. Anderson, an alumnus, is chairman of the division of business administration 
of SSC, confers with business alumni. Left to right: Mrs. Jestine Moran, instructor, Harris 
Area School; Mrs. Jessie Hankerson, Secretary, Greenbriar Children's Center; and Mrs. 
Ruby Black, Cashier, Afro-American Life Insurance Company. 

These alumni are enrolled in the special course in Office Machines at SSC. 

Directory of Alumni Chapters 



Albany, Georgia 
Athens, Georgia 
Atlanta, Georgia 
Augusta, Georgia 
Claxton, Georgia 
Columbus, Georgia 
Dublin, Georgia 
Griffin, Georgia 
Homerville, Georgia 
Jesup, Georgia 
Macon, Georgia 
Madison, Georgia 
Mcintosh, Georgia 
Reidsville, Georgia 
Sandersville, Georgia 
Savannah, Georgia 
Statesboro, Georgia 
Valdosta, Georgia 
Washington, D. C. 
Waynesboro, Georgia 



Mr. Benjamin Graham '55 
Mr. Willie H. McBride '49 
Mr. Arthur Richardson '40 
Miss Ethel Mack 
Mr. Charles L. Bailey '53 
Mr. Charles DuVaul '26 
Mr. Timothy Ryals '54 
Mr. L. L. Banks '43 
Mr. E. T. Whitaker '37 
Mr. Arthur Williams '49 
Mr. W. J. Sutton '48 
Mr. Robert Jackson '55 
Mr. Jesse Stevens 
Mrs. Josie Sessoms '36 
Elnus Williams 
Mr. James Luten '38 
Mrs. Etheleen Talbert '48 
Mr. Isaiah Isom '58 
Mrs. Ora M. Washington 
Mr. R. E. Blakeney '31 



Albany State College 

248 Plaza 

Samuel Archer High 

1211 Tenth Street 

7 Long Street 

Spencer High School 

Oconee High School 

502 North Sixth Street 

Homerville High and Elementary 

Wayne County Training School 

1601 Anthony Road 

Pearl Street High School 

Hineshaw Elementary School 

Reidsville, Georgia 

Davisboro Academy 

Sophronia Tompkins High 

2 Carver Street 

Pinevale High School 

3719 Kansas Avenue, N. W. 

Waynesboro High and Industrial 



Schedule Announced 
For Evening Classes 

T. C. Meyers, Dean of Faculty 
at Savannah State College, an- 
nounces the following schedule 
of late afternoon and evening 
classes for the fall quarter, 1962. 
Course, number, credit, descrip- 
tive title, day, period, time, place, 
and instructor follows: 

Mathematics, 107.12-13, five 
credit hours, Intermediate Alge- 
bra, Monday and Wednesday, 12 
and 13 period, 7:45-9:55, Hill 
Hall 101, to be assigned; Library 
Science 302, 5 credit hours, 
Cataloging and Classification, 
Saturday, 8:30-1:00, Library, 
Mrs. Madeline G. Dixon; Chem- 
istry 101.10-12, five credit hours, 
General Inorganic Chemistry, 
Lectures on Monday, Tuesday, 
Wednesday, Thursday, 10th 
period, 5:20-6:10, 6:20-8:50, D 
209, Dr. Charles Pratt; Eco- 
nomics 201.11-12, 5 credit hours, 
Principles of Economics, Friday, 
11th and 12th periods, 6:30-8:50, 
D 122, Dr. Cleveland O. Chris- 
tophe; Mechanical Technology, 
101.11-12, 5 credit hours, Engi- 
neering Drawing I, Lecture Mon- 
day, 11th period, 6:30-7:35, 
Laboratory, Tuesday, Wednes- 
day, and Thursday, 11th and 12th 
periods, 6:30-8:50, D 11, Staff. 

Humanities 221, 5 credit hours, 
English Communicative Skills, 
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, 
Thursday, 11th period, 6:30-7:35, 
D 122, Hosea Lofton; Humanities 
221, 5 credit hours, Elementary 
German, Daily, 9th period, 4:20- 
5:10, D 123 and Language Labor- 
atory, Julius Stevens; Social 
Science, 101.12-13, 5 credit hours, 
History of Western Culture, 
Tuesday and Thursday, 12th and 
13th hours, 7:45-9:55, Powell 5, 
to be assigned; and Social 455, 
5 credit hours, Introduction to 



Library Science Program 
Helps School Libraries 

The Library Science curricu- 
lum at Savannah State College 
has attracted a large number of 
in-service teachers, who are 
seeking certification as teacher 
librarians. The program is de- 
signed to provide four basic 
courses amounting to twenty 
quarter hours as required by the 
State Department of Education. 
The course content provides the 
future school librarians with 
knowledge of the important day- 
to-day operations of the school 
library, the fundamentals of 
cataloging and classification, 
the importance of book selection, 
and reference service. 

During the 1962 summer ses- 
sion, the college offered courses 
in School Library Administra- 
tion and Organization, School 
Library Materials (Book Selec- 
tion) and Basic Reference 
Sources. E. J. Josey, Librarian 
and Associate Professor and Mrs. 
Madeline Harrison Dixon, Cata- 
log Librarian and Assistant Pro- 
fessor, served as instructors for 
the courses. 



Social Work, Monday and 
Wednesday, 11th and 12th 
periods, 6:30-8:50, D 123, Dr. 
Joan Gordon. 

Intermediate Algebra is open 
to selected high school seniors, 
with the consent of the instruc- 
tor. Cataloging and Classifica- 
tion, enrollment limted to in- 
service educational personnel. 
Principals of Economics, supple- 
mentary instruction, discussion, 
etc., for the College of the Air 
"The American Economy," 
WTOC-TV, beginning September 
24, 1962, viewing time 7:00-7:30 
a.m., Monday, Tuesday, Wednes- 
day, Thursday, and Friday. 




Shown above are members of the initial group of high school graduates who 
participated in the first Pilot Study Project to be held on the campus. 

Twenty students from Savannah and other communities in this region participated. 
The Pilot Study program was an experimental examination of the effectiveness of four 
weeks of accelerated instruction on recent (June, 1962) high school graduates. 

At the beginning of the program, the students were administered various standardized 
tests to establish some index as to their mental abilities and the extent of their high 
school preparation. Again they will be tested to see what effect, if any, this training had, 
and at the end of their first academic year at Savannah State the group will be given 
various standardized examinations to determine if their performance in College was 
affected by the rigorous academic program in which they participated after finishing 
high school. 

Mrs. Louise Owens, Mr. Robert Holt, Mr. Frederick Brown, Dr. John Wilson, Miss 
L. E. Davis, and Mr. John Clemmons were faculty personnel connected with instruction 
in the project. Dr. E. K. Williams, Co-ordinator of General Education, was the projects 
director. 

The project was jointly sponsored by Savannah State College and the Southern 
Education Foundation. 



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SSC Graduate Completes 
Military Training 

FORT LEAVENWORTH, KAN. 
(AHTNCI — Army Reserve Maj. 
Charles E. Brown, Jr., 42, son of 
Mrs. Catherine E. Brown, 1019 
Cumberland St., Harrisburg, Pa., 
recently completed the two-week 
associate command and general 
staff course at The Command 
and General Staff College, Fort 
Leavenworth, Kan. 

Phased over a five-year period, 
the course parallels the resident 
course at the college. Approxi- 
mately 300 reserve officers at- 
tended this session of the course. 

The college, the Army's senior 
tactical school, was established 
in 1881 as the School of Applica- 
tion of Infantry and Cavalry. 

Major Brown and his wife, 
Cornelia, live at 40 Forty-sixth 
St., N.E., Washington. D. C. He 
is assigned to the Washington, 
D. C, U. S.. Army Reserve School 
at Fort Myer, Va. 

The major is employed as a 
teacher by the District of Co- 
lumbia Public Schools, Wash- 
ington. A member of Omega Psi 
Phi fraternity, he received his 
bachelor of science degree from 
Savannah iGa.) State College 
in 1941. 



SSC Instructor Dies 

Hosea Lofton, instructor in 
English and coordinator of the 
Freshmen English classes, was 
stricken in class at Savannah 
State College and died enroute 
to Charity Hospital, Thursday, 
February 14, 1963 about 1:30 p.m. 
Lofton was born in Blackshear, 
Georgia, September 16, 1930. He 
is survived by his wife, Mrs. 
Mattie Pearl Lofton, his mother, 
Mrs. Katie Lofton and a brother, 
Clarence Lofton, a teacher at 
Tompkins Senior High School. 




Hosea Lofton was editor-in- 
chief of the student newspaper 
1950-52. He graduated from Sa- 
vannah State College with 
honors in 1952, and received his 
M.A. degree from North Carolina 
College at Durham, 1961. Lofton 
was a member of the National 
Council of College English 
Teachers, Georgia Teachers and 
Education Association, and the 
American Association of Uni- 
versity Professors. 

Prior to returning to his Alma 
Mater in September, 1962, Lofton 
served as publicity director and 
Adviser to student publications, 
St. Augustine College, Raleigh, 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

M.H3MMU wmv§> anemia 



Volume 4 — No. 2 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



March, 1963 




President W. K. Payne, Savannah State College, presenting Andrew Hatcher, 
Associate Press Secretary, The White House, Washington, D. C, with a trophy for his 
outstanding contribution as a speaker and consultant at the Southern Regional School 
Press Institute, Savannah State College, February 7-8. 

College Host to Foreign Language Workshop 



Dr. W. K. Payne, President of 
Savannah State College, has an- 
nounced that the institution will 
serve as host to the Student 
Council of Foreign Languages in 
a one-day workshop, to be spon- 
sored by the Council, to be held 
on the campus. 

Dr. Howard M. Jason, head of 
the Foreign Language Depart- 
ment will serve as liaison officer 
for the Council and the College. 
In announcing the role of host 

North Carolina. At one time 
Lofton taught school in Pierce 
County, Georgia, where he was 
the adviser to student publica- 
tions. Lofton was a scriptwriter 
and announcer for Radio Station 
WAYX in Waycross. He won 
numerous awards in high school 
and college. While at Savannah 
State College, he was a student 
aide in public relations and pub- 
licity. Lofton was a graduate 
assistant at North Carolina Col- 
lege. 

According to reports, Lofton 
delivered a most revealing and 
fact finding report at a depart- 
mental staff meeting less than 
an hour prior to his death. He 
was reported in fine physical 
shape and participated in 
various college activities includ- 
ing the Press Institute where he 
spoke at the Press Reception at 
the First Federal National Bank 
on Friday evening February 8 
for the delegates attending the 
12th Annual Southern Regional 
Press Institute sponsored by Sa- 
vannah State College. 



to be played by Savannah State 
Dr. Payne said the college was 
happy to serve the cause of a 
program in its inception that 
will mean much to the develop- 
ment of scholarship in the for- 
eign languages. 

Mr. Herman F. Bostick, con- 
sultant for the State Depart- 
ment of Education in the area 
of Foreign Languages will act 
as chairman of the one-day 
affair.. 




Prince Mitchell checks financial reports. 
Mr. Mitchell is an alumnus of Savannah 
State College and is now employed as 
bookkeeper in the Business Office of the 
College. 



SSC Librarian 

Appointed to Savannah 

Library Board 

E. J. Josey was one of two 
Negro citizens appointed to the 
Board of Managers of the Savan- 
nah Public Library. Eugene 
Gadsden, a local attorney and 
an alumnus of Savannah State 
shares this historic honor with 
Mr. Josey. Mayor Malcolm Mac- 
lean recommended the appoint- 
ment and City Council approved 
on Wednesday, December 19th. 

E. J. Josey was born in Norfolk, 
Virginia, and educated in the 
public schools of Portsmouth, 
Virginia. He is a veteran of 
World War II. 

A graduate of Howard Uni- 
versity where he received the 
A.B. degree in History, Mr. Josey 
matriculated at Columbia Uni- 
versity and received the M.A. de- 
gree in History; his professional 
training in Librarianship was 
done at the State University of 
New York, Albany, New York, 
where the M.S.L.S. was con- 
ferred. 

Among the positions he has 
held in various professional 
capacities are Desk Assistant, 
Journalism Library, Columbia 
University, Technical Assistant, 
New York Public Library; 
Librarian 1, Freq Library of 
Philadelphia; Instructor of So- 
cial Sciences, Savannah State 
College (1954-1955); Librarian, 
Delaware State College (1955- 
59) ; and currently Librarian and 
Associated Professor, Savannah 
State College (July 1, 1959). 

Mr. Josey was the first Negro 
to edit the Delaware Library As- 
sociation Bulletin. As a member 
of the Delaware State Depart- 
ment of Public Instruction, 
School Librarian Certification 
Revision Committee, Mr. Josey 
was asked to serve as recorder 
of that group. He is a member 
of the Editorial Committee of 
the Savannah State College Re- 
search Bulletin. Mr. Josey is also 
chairman of the College Library 
Division of the Library Section 
of the Georgia Teacher and 
Education Association. 

His professional affiliations in- 
clude the American Library As- 
sociation, American Association 
of University Professors, Associ- 
ation of College and Research 
Libraries and the George Teach- 
ers and Education Association. 

The author of many articles 
in professional and national 
publications, he is the author of 
an article which appears in the 
current issue of College and Re- 
search Libraries. This publication 
is the official journal of the As- 
sociation of College and Re- 
search Libraries. Mr. Josey made 
a survey of 500 university and 
college libraries in the United 
States in order to ascertain the 
extent of instruction in library 
use in these institutions. In ad- 
dition an effort was made to 
access the role of the library 
staff in the process. 



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Page 2 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



March, 1963 



The Savannah State College Alumni Newsletter 

The Savannah State College Newsletter is published quarterly 
by Savannah State College through the Office of Public Relations. 

Dr. William K. Payne President 

Wilton C. Scott, Director of Public Relations Adviser 

Daniel Washington, '59 Editor 

Julia Cheely, '63 Associate Editor 

James R. Smith, '66 Aide 

Robert Mobley Photographer 

Savannah State Press Institute 
A Fine Contribution 

(Reprint from Atlanta Daily World, Thursday, February 14, 1963) 

Youthful journalists attending the Southern School Press In- 
stitute recently at Savannah State College were given splendid 
working knowledge of an exacting profession. 

With an array of the nation's most successful newspapermen 
on hand as consultants, high school and college students were made 
familiar with the ethics, traditions, skills, techniques and inventive- 
ness of many different types of journalism. 

The Institute, founded twelve years ago by Wilton C. Scott, 
has grown in stature year by year. This year saw the workshop 
headed by a corps of experts, including Andrew T. Hatcher, White 
House Associate Press Secretary. 

The continuation and growth of the Institute is proof that able, 
intelligent, sincere and hard-working young people in our schools 
can continue to look forward to gainful employment and success 
in the profession of journalism. 

Savannah State College is making a worthwhile contribution to 
democracy in stimulating school age groups into a profession of 
honor, integrity and respectability. 

Southeast Pays Low Salaries 

The states of the Southeast pay the lowest salaries in the nation 
to professors and instructors on their college faculties. Four years 
ago this was true, too, but today the Southern salaries lag further 
behind the rest of the nation than they did four years ago. 

These facts, and some more about the toll they take of higher 
education in the South, are included in the Southern Regional 
Education Board's publication, Financing Higher Education, Issue 
No. 12, released recently. 

Four years ago, the South paid its instructors an average of 
$394 less than the national average. Today they are paid some $619 
less than the national average. Full professors in the South earned 
an average of $1,122 less than the average four years ago — today 
they earn some $1,520 less. 

The gaps between faculty salaries grow larger in spite of the 
fact that salary levels in the South have increased 19 per cent for 
instructors and 26 per cent for full professors during the four 
years, the SREB reports. Such improvement is behind that made 
in other parts of the nation where instructors' salaries increased 
22 per cent and professors increased 27 per cent. 

These budget facts cheat the South of many potentially good 
teachers for its colleges and universities in two ways, the SREB said. 

First, because young people in the South will be attracted to 
other professions which offer better salaries, and second, because 
those who do want to teach in spite of everything, will want to 
teach in other parts of the country where the salaries are better. 

A study by Dr. John W. Gustad made while he was at the 
University of Maryland shows that many college teachers who leave 
the profession give low salaries as the primary reason for their 
change. The study showed that other jobs attract them at better 
salaries than the colleges pay. For instance, the starting salary for 
jobs requiring a Ph.D. is $8,500 to $10,000 in industry — it is $5,000 
to $7,000 at large colleges and universities. 

"Most current surveys have shown that salary is important in 
the recruitment and retention of adequate faculty staff," said Dr. 
E. F. Schietinger of the SREB research staff. "The South's failure 
to provide good salaries and sufficient opportunity for advancement 
in salary at the university is costing its talents which are badly 
needed at this time." 



SSC Alumnus Stationed 
In Louisiana 

Army Pvt. Louis H. Pratt, son 
of Hugh I. Pratt, 212 E. Park 
Avenue, Savannah, Georgia, was 
assigned to the 562d Artillery, 
a Nike-Hercules missile unit in 
Shreveport, La., November 24. 

Pratt entered the Army in 
September 1962 and was last 
stationed at Fort Jackson, South 
Carolina. 

The 25-year-old soldier, son 
of Mrs. Gertrude P. Johnson, 512 
E. Anderson St., is a graduate of 
Alfred E. Beach High School 



Columbia Chapter 
Gets New Member 

Miss Colleen M. Gooden, a new 
member of the Chapter, (52) 
Social Science Major received 
the Masters in Education at 
Florida A & M University in 
Tallahassee, Florida (June, 1962). 
Presently, she is employed by 
the District of Columbia Public 
School System in Washington, 
D. C. She obtained this position 
the second day after her arrival 
in the District. 

and a graduate of Savannah 
State College in 1958. 




A friendly chat with guest speaker folio 
School Press Institute. Left to right, they an 
Coca-Cola Bottling Company, Baltimore, Md.; 
Public Relations Director, United States-Nigei 
Hospital Center- Dr. W. K. Payne, President, S. 
Scott, Director, Southern Regional School Press I 



ig luncheon for 
Russell Young, Pi 
r. Otto McClarri 
n Foundation fo, 
avannah State C 
nstitute. 



the Southerr 
Jblic Relatioi 
n (Luncheon 
the Ojike 
ollege, and 



Regional 
is Officer, 
Speaker), 
Memorial 
Wilton C. 



Junior Executive Training 
Program Opens for Home 
Economics Students 

The 1963 Pillsbury Awards 
Program offers Home Economics 
students graduating between 
January and June, 1963, the 
opportunity to apply for a 
"dream" junior executive po- 
sition in Pillsbury's Home Service 
Center. 

On June 20, 1963, the top 
award winner will step into a 
key position as Associate Direc- 
tor of Pillsbury's Junior Home 
Service Center, receiving a salary 
of $4,800. 

This unusual, one-y/ear po- 
sition includes being introduced 
to the 1963 American Home Eco- 
nomics Association Convention 
•in Kansas City, attending the 
15th Grand National Bake-Off 
as Pillsbury's official hostess to 
the Junior Contestants (the 1962 
winner met Mrs. Dwight D. 
Eisenhower during the Bake-Off 
in New York last September), 
and appearing on women's TV 
programs around the United 
States. Other aspects of the As- 
sociate Director's position in- 
clude testing and developing 
recipes, speaking to teen-age 
groups about Home Economics 
careers, writing teen-age party 
books and posing for newspaper 
pictures on teen parties. 

The Junior executive training 
program is planned to give prac- 
tical and personalized training 
in the operation of major cor- 
porate departments, relating 
their operations to the role of 
the home economist in business. 
This includes training in the re- 
search and development labora- 
tory, packaging, marketing, pub- 
lic relations and company ad- 
vertising agencies. 

To apply for the 1963 Pillsbury 
Awards Program, or for further 
information, see your Dean of 
Home Economics. Application 
deadline for the 1963 program is 
November 14, 1962. 




Mrs. Thelma Roundtree, Adviser to the 
Student Newspaper, Saint Augustine's Col- 
lege, Raleigh, North Carolina, graciously 
accepting a trophy from President W. K. 
Payne, during the Southern Regional 
School Press Institute. Mrs. Roundtree is a 
graduate of Savannah State College. 




Mrs. Elizabeth D. Washington, a recent 
graduate of Savannah State College, has 
been added to the faculty of Todd-Grant 
High School. Mrs. Washington is doing 
a tremendous job coaching the girls' 
basketball team. 




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March, 1963 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



Page 3 



SSC's Southern Regional Press Awards 

ELEMENTARY NEWSPAPERS 

The Oglethorpe Reporter — Atlanta, Georgia Superior 

J. F. Beavers — College Park, Georgia Excellent 

JUNIOR HIGH NEWSPAPERS 

The Carver Mirror — Albany, Georgia Superior 

HIGH SCHOOL NEWSPAPERS (Division A) 

The Johnson Explorer — Sol. C. Johnson, Savannah Superior 

HIGH SCHOOL NEWSPAPERS (Division B) 

The Hornet — Lee Street School, Blackshear Excellent 

COLLEGE NEWSPAPERS 

The Pen — St. Augustine's College, Raleigh, N. C. Superior 

HIGH SCHOOL YEARBOOKS 

The Atom Smasher — Sol C. Johnson, Savannah Superior 

The Hamiltonian — Hamilton High School, Avondale Estates 

Superior 

The Wildcat — Price High, Atlanta, Georgia Excellent 

The Fairmontonian — Fairmont High School, Griffin, Ga. 

Excellent 

OUTSTANDING NEWS ARTICLES 
Elementary Schools 

"Metropolitan Opera Comes to Pupils," by F. Harris 

The Oglethorpe Reporter, October-December, 1962 

High School 

"Press Institute," by Linda Williams Johnson Explorer 

March, 1962 
Junior High 
"Liberal Party Sweeps to Victory" — The Carver Mirror (Albany) 

October, 1962 
College 

Maurvene DeBerry in THE PEN St. Augustine's College 

January, 1963 

Southern Regional Press Institute 
Held February 7-8, 1963 



Savannah State College spon- 
sored the Southern Regional 
School Press Institute as an edu- 
cational activity, Thursday and 
Friday, February 7-8, 1963. The 
theme for this occasion was THE 
SCHOOL PRESS AT THE NEW 
FRONTIER. 

This year's Institute featured 
noted speakers as Dr. J. Leroy 
Thompson, Director, Educational 
Service Bureau, Dow Jones & 
Company, Inc., Publishers The 
Wall Street Journal and Barron's 
National Business and Financial 
Weekly, who served as the key- 
note speaker on Thursday, 
February 7, at 10:20 A.M. Dr. 
Thompson was born in Wash- 
ington, C. H., Ohio. He received 
his A.B. degrees from Wilming- 
ton College in Ohio, his M.A. 
from Columbia University, and 
Ed.D. degree from Columbia 
University. Dr. Thompson has 
served as Principal at H. S. Rich- 
wood, Ohio; Assistant Superin- 
tendent of Schools, Newburgh, 
N. Y.; Superintendent of Schools, 
Tarrytown, N. Y.; Visiting 
lecturer. Graduate Schools, New 
York University, Alfred Univer- 
sity and Lehigh University. 

Dr. Thompson is a member of 
the following organization: 
Rotary International, N.E.A., 
American Association of School 
Administration, American Fi- 
nance Association, Past Presi- 
dent, Rotar Westchester County 
School Masters Club, New York 
State Attorney and Child Adjust- 
ment Workers, Red Cross, and 
Community Chest. He holds 
honorary positions. 

He is a member of the State 
Committee Social and Economic 
Trends, Appointed by Governor 
Lehman to State Research Com- 
mittee, Academy of Advertising, 
Advisory Council American 
Viewpoint, Inc., Kappa Delta Pi, 



Phi Delta Kappa, and Gamma 
Phi Gamma. 

A treat this year was the 
Honorable Andrew Hatcher, As- 
sociate Press Secretary, The 
White House, Washington, D. C. 
He delivered the principal ad- 
dress in Meldrim Auditorium on 
Thursday, February 7 at 7:30 
P.M. Hatcher is the first Negro 
to serve as Associate Press Secre- 
tary for the President of the 
United States. 

Dr. Otto McClarrin, Public Re- 
lations Director for the United 
States-Nigerian Foundation for 
the Ojika Memorial Hospital 
Center, and Information Special- 
ist for the U. S. Civil Rights 
Commission, was the Luncheon 
speaker on Friday, February 8 
at 1:00 P.M. 



African Freedom 
Fund Created 

The U. S. National Student As- 
sociation, a national organiza- 
tion of students from four hun- 
dred colleges and universities, 
announced recently the creation 
of an African Freedom Fund to 
meet the pressing needs of the 
three hundred African students 
who dramatically announced 
their decision to end their study 
at Bulgarian universities. 

This decision by the African 
students, which has been re- 
ceived internationally as a heavy 
blow at racism in the Communist 
bloc, was also the result of build- 
ing resentment against the 
Bulgarian government's at- 
tempts to indoctrinate them and 
to control their efforts to form 
an All African Students' Union; 
the February 11 arrest of the 
leadership of the nascent stu- 
dent union; and the February 
12 police assault on African stu- 
dents demonstrating against the 
government ban on the Union. 




Some of the Principals at the Southern Regional School Press Institute held at 
Savannah State College, February 7-8. They are from left to right: Marion Jackson, 
Sports Editor, The Atlanta Daily World, Atlanta, Georgia; Kiah Sayles, Public Relations 
Officer for P. Ballantine & Sons of New York City, New York; Dr. Andrew T. Hatcher, 
Associate Press Secretary, The White House, Washington, D. C; Dr. William K. Payne,- 
President, Savannah State College, Savannah, Georgia, and Wilton C. Scott, Public 
Relations Director, Savannah State College and Director of the School Press Institute. 



The African students insist 
that the racial attitudes of the 
Bulgarian government and of 
their fellow Bulgarian students 
were decisive factors in the 
policy. They particularly cite the 
Arab Students' Union which has 
been permitted to organize there 
in recent months as proof of the 
racial basis of the suppression 
of their organization. 

The students represent 
twenty-two African nations and 
territories and seek new oppor- 
tunities for study outside the 
Communist bloc. Those who have 
personal sources of funds have 
already left. Many of them are 
awaiting offers for scholarships 
elsewhere in Europe. Most do 
not have the funds to leave 
Bulgaria nor do they have any 
promise of scholarship assist- 
ance in other countries. 

The African Freedom Fund 
was created by the USNSA to 
receive donations from students, 
interested individuals, and 
organizations to meet the 
present and future needs of the 
student refugees. It seeks to 
provide scholarship funds for 
study in this country, Europe, 
and Africa; transportation costs 
out of Bulgaria; and residence 
costs during study here or 
abroad. 

The USNSA, through the Co- 
ordinating Secretariat of Na- 
tional Unions, is in touch with 
the African students and the 
Ghanain officials who are assist- 
ing them. Some individuals have 
already committed partial funds 
to USNSA for transportation 
and the Institute of Modern 
Languages in Washington, D. C, 
has given the Fund five tuition 
grants for language study. 

The Association directed a 
general appeal to its member 
colleges and universities for, as 
Dennis Shaul, USNSA President, 




SSC Alumnus Is 
U. S. Captain 

CLARK AB, Philippine Islands 
— Arthur L. Johnson of Adel, Ga., 
has been promoted to captain in 
the United States Air Force. 

Captain Johnson is a medical 
laboratory officer in the USAF 
hospital here. He is the son of 
Mr. and Mrs. Arthur L. Johnson 
of 618 W. Eighth St., Adel. 

The captain, who holds a B.S. 
degree from Savannah (Ga.) 
State College, is a member of 
Omega Psi Phi. 

He and his wife, the former 
Rosetta C. Brown of 605 Way St., 
Valdosta, Ga., have two children. 



said, "The need is imperative; 
the moral is clear. This is a time 
for action." Funds should be sent 
to: "African Freedom Fund, 
USNSA, 3457 Chestnut Street, 
Philadelphia 4, Pennsylvania." 



CJO 

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Page 4 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



March, 1963 



Alumna Serves as Faculty Advisor 
At St. Augustine College 



Mrs. Thelma Johnson Round- 
tree is a native of Rome, Geor- 
gia and a graduate of the his- 
torical Main High School of that 
city. Her early interests in com- 
municative arts were revealed 
when she was a high school stu- 
dent by her participation in 
dramatics, oratory, and journal- 
istic writing. 

She is an alumna of the Sa- 
vannah State College from 
which she received the B.S. de- 
gree. Mrs. Roundtree who was 
then Thelma Johnson was a 
member of the Tiger's Roar staff, 
the college newspaper. Her 
assignments moved from copy 
editor to that of a literary editor. 

"A Study of the Relationship 
between Social Factors and 
aspects of Language Usage" is 
the subject of her research 
project which was submitted to 
Atlanta University from which 
she received the M.A. degree. 
Data yielded from this study has 
had many revealing educational 
implications for the teaching of 
English which she has projected 
through English and journalism 
classes. 

She has done further study as 
a John Hay Whitney Fellow at 
Columbia University and partici- 
pated in the planned Humanities 
seminars for the John Hay Fel- 
lows at Yale University. 

Mrs. Roundtree is a teacher 
of English at Saint Augustine's 
College, Raleigh, North Carolina. 
She is also the adviser to the 
Pen, the college newspaper. 



Thomas C. Johnson 
Teacher at Hubert 
Junior High School 

After graduating as president 
of the class of June, 1957, 
Thomas C. Johnson went to 
Forsyth, Georgia as director of 
the Dramatics Department and 
head of the Science Department 
of the Hubbard High School. 

Since then he has been em- 
ployed by the Chatham County 
Board of Education. While in 
Chatham County Johnson has 
represented Chatham County in 
Dublin, Georgia at the State 
Leadership Institute, in Atlanta, 
Georgia at the State Convention 
of the G.T.E.A. and as a Science 
group leader in the local post 
planning days. 

He has received one grant 
from the State Science Depart- 
ment in Mathematics and three 
grants from the National Science 
Foundation in Chemistry, 
Physics and Biology. 

He is currently working on a 
Master's Degree at South Caro- 
lina State College, Orangeburg, 
South Carolina. 

He is married to the former 
Miss Shirley Demons and has 
one son, Thomas C. Johnson, III. 
He is a member of the First 
African Baptist Church. 



Mrs. Delores F. Brown 
Teaches Spanish 

Mrs. Delores F. Brown, a fifth 
grade and Spanish teacher of 
John W. Hubert School, partici- 
pated in one of the foreign 
language institutes at Kent 
State University, Kent, Ohio, 
under the National Defense Edu- 
cation Act. 

El Espanol (Spanish) was the 
area of concentration. The 
participant stated that every- 
thing was done in Spanish. 
Among the forty-six persons 
who were in attendance two 
natives from Cuba, one from 
Mexico, Paraguay, Argentina, 
Bolivia and Peru. 

All of the instructors were 
natives of Spanish speaking 
countries. "A very rewarding ex- 
perience," stated Mrs. Brown. "I 
shall never forget the most in- 
teresting and wonderful events. 
The concerts, the fiestas, the 
competive games (baseball, 
tennis, etc.) the tour and ob- 
servation of the foreign lan- 
guage classes at the Western Re- 
serve University, Cleveland, Ohio 
and the Art Museum. 

"Spanish is a good-neighbor 
language and a language of com- 
mercial, political and cultural 
importance; but, in addition, it 
is the easiest of the major West- 
ern languages to learn, at least 
in its initial stages. 

Mrs. Brown feels that every- 
one should learn at least one 
foreign language. 



Wilson Employed By 

U. S. Air Force 

Lester Wilson, Class of 1962, 
has recently been employed by 
the United States Air Force 
Aeronautical Chart and Infor- 
mation Center. He is enrolled in 
the Cartographer Training Pro- 
gram being conducted at ACIC's 
training school in St. Louis, 
Missouri. 

This six-month Civil Service 
Commission approved course 
provides a broad background in 
chart compilation and related 
fields. Subjects covered in the 
curriculum include Geodesy 
(exact measurement of the 
earth), Astronomy, Physical 
Geography and Photogram- 
metry (making charts from 
photographs). 

When Lester completes the 
course, he will be assigned to 
the Production and Distribution 
Plant of ACIC located in St. 
Louis, Missouri, at the historic 
site of the St. Louis Arsenal on 
Second and Arsenal Streets. 

Its mission is basically the 
production of aeronautical 
charts, graphic air target ma- 
terials, flight information pub- 
lications, maps, terrain, models, 
evaluated intelligence on air 
facilities and related carto- 
graphic devices for the United 
States Air Force and other De- 
partment of Defense agencies. 




Members of Iota Phi Lambda Sorority conferring with Dr. W. K. Payne, President 
of Savannah State College on plans for the Southern Regional Conference of the 
Sorority, to be held at the College on March 15-17, 1963. They are from left to right. 
Dr. W. K. Payne, President of Savannah State College; Mrs. Thelma T. Lee, President, 
Nu Chapter Savannah, Georgia; Mrs. Helen DeLeon, Weathers, General Conference 
Chairman, Southern Regional Conference, Savannah, Georgia and Mrs. Gertrude Green, 
a graduate of Savannah State College, now working with the Chatham County De- 
partmen of Health and Welfare. 



SSC Graduate 
Serves With Army 
In Hawaii 

Army PFC Nathaniel Frazier, 
25, whose wife, Edna, lives at 
1320 Church St., Savannah, Ga., 
is participating with other mem- 
bers of the 25th Infantry Di- 
vision in a three-week training 
exercise in Hawaii. 

Frazier's unit, Company A of 
the division's 14th Infantry, has 
moved by sea and air from its 
home station at Schofield 
Barracks on Oahu, to the Army's 
Pohakuloa Training on Hawaii 
for combined mobility and fire- 
power exercises with other di- 
visional units. 

He is a gunner in the company. 
Frazier entered the Army in 
September 1961 and received 
basic training at Fort Jackson, 
S. C. He was stationed at Fort 
Chaffee, Ark., and arrived over- 
seas in March 1962. 

Frazier attended Tompkins 
High School and received his 
bachelor's degree in 1961 from 
Savannah State College. He is a 
member of Alpha Phi Alpha 
fraternity. 



$300,000 Recognition 

(ACP) — Frederick Loewe, who 
became a child prodigy pianist 
and then a highly-successful 
composer without benefit of a 
college education, has donated 
royalties to the University of 
Redlands, Redlands, California. 

The Redlands Bulldog says the 
"My Fair Lady" composer has 
donated 35 per cent of the stock 
and amateur rights of his show 
"Camelot" to the university. The 
gift is expected to bring some 
$300,000 to the university over 
the period in which the copy- 
right of "Camelot" is in effect. 

Loewe said the gift was made 
in recognition of the excellent 
UR music department and will 
be used to enrich the depart- 
ment's program. 



SSC Graduate Is 
School Principal 

Mr. Norman B. Elmore Receives 
Sixth-Year Certificate 

Mr. Norman B. Elmore, Princi- 
pal of the Florance Street 
School, Savannah, Georgia, is a 
product of the local schools. He 
received the B.S. degree from 
Savannah State College in 1941, 
the Master of Education degree 
from Atlanta University and a 
Sixth-Year Certificate in Ad- 
vanced Education from New 
York University in 1962. 

Mr. Elmore is affiliated with 
the following civic organiza- 
tions: Chairman of the Board of 
Management of the West Broad 
Street Y.M.C.A., Member of the 
Chatham Division of Boy Scouts 
of America, Vice President of 
the Mid-Town Chamber of Com- 
merce, Member of the Teacher 
Salary Committee of the G.T.E.A. 
and Basileus of Mu Phi Chapter 
— Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc. 
He is also a member of the First 
Jerusalem Baptist Church. 

His past offices held include: 
President of Jenkins County 
Teachers Association for two 
terms, President of Chatham 
County Teachers Association, 
served for three years as Treas- 
urer of the Chatham County 
Teachers Association, Reporter 
for the Savannah State College 
General Alumni Association, 
Vice Chairman of the Chatham 
County Division of the Boy 
Scouts of America and Chair- 
man of NEA Centennial Cele- 
bration Committee of C.C.T.A. 

Mr. Elmore has received the 
following certificates and merit 
awards: Y.M.C.A. Distinguished 
Service Award, Service Award 
received for service rendered as 
President of C.C.T.A.— 1952-54, 
Certificate for service rendered 
for the C.C.T.A. during American 
Education Week, 1955, C.C.T.A. 
Certificate of Merit as past 
President, 1957 and a plaque for 
leadership and service from the 
Savannah State College National 
Alumni Association in 1961. 




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March, 1963 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



Page 5 



Public Relations Sec'ty 
Resigns to Join 
Husband in Germany 

Mrs. Lillie A. Powell, secretary 
to the Director of Public Rela- 
tions at Savannah State College, 
has recently resigned from this 
position to go to Germany. Mrs. 
Powell and daughter, Deborah 
Patricia, will join her husband, 
Sergeant Samuel Powell, now 
stationed there. 

A farewell luncheon was given 
in her honor in the faculty 
dining room of Adam's Hall, by 
the Director of Public Relations, 
prior to her leaving the College. 

Mrs. Powell is an alumna of 
Savannah State College, and be- 
gan work four and one half years 
ago as clerk typist in the Office 
of Public Relations and later 
earned a promotion to the po- 
sition of secretary to the Direc- 
tor. 

To replace Mrs. Powell, Dr. W. 
K. Payne, President of Savannah 
State College, has appointed Mrs. 
Emma D. Murray, a graduate of 
Southern University, Baton 
Rouge, Louisiana. Mrs. Murray 
has served previously as secre- 
tary to the Director of Student 
Personnel here at Savannah 
State College. 



Drive Opens to Erect 
Center in Memory of 
E. R. Gay 

A drive, soliciting funds for a 
cottage to be erected in the 
memory of the late E. R. Gay, 
officially opens with pride and 
confidence in his friends that 
they will make generous con- 
tributions toward this goal. This 
will be the Clarke County Cabin 
at the 4-H Club Center at 
Dublin, Georgia in. his memory. 

According to information re- 
ceived from the State Extension 
office, $5,500 is required to erect 
a cabin. Mr. Gay had already 
paid into the camp fund $476.13, 
and since his death, friends have 
donated approximately $350. 
The sum of $4,673.87 must be 
secured in order to have a 
cottage dedicated in his honor. 

The Board of County Commis- 

- sioners of Clarke County has 

- heartily endorsed the project, 

■• i for it realizes that using the 

facilities at the 4-H Center has 

helped hundreds of boys and 

girls become better citizens. If 

this Center is to continue to 

grow, more cabins must be built. 

There are hundreds of youth in 

Georgia waiting to be helped by 

4-H work. 



SHOCK THEM 

(ACP) — Some people devour 
aspirins when they have head- 
aches, drown in whisky when 
they are nervous, and cloud 
themselves in tobacco when they 
are anxious. But what do you 
do for traffic accidents? 

The Daily Trojan, University 
of Southern California, Los 
Angeles, quotes Chaytor Mason, 
lecturer in aviation psychology, 
as suggesting: "Shock them." 

Says Mason: The average 
driver builds up a "protective 
fantasy" about himself, but con- 
tinual reminders on safety must 
follow the idea that "an accident 
can happen to me." 



Fellowships Provided 
By $220,000 Grant 

ST. LOUIS, Mo. (LP.)— A four- 
year graduate program for stu- 
dents in the Ph.D. program in 
history, with emphasis on the 
preparation of history teachers, 
was announced recently by 
Chancellor Thomas H. Eliot of 
Washington University. The pro- 
gram will be offered by the Uni- 
versity's department of history 
beginning in the fall of 1963. 

A $220,000 Danforth Founda- 
tion grant will provide fellowship 
awards for graduate students for 
the first three years required to 
complete requirements for the 
Ph.D. under the pilot program's 
four years. 

Each student will engage in 
supervised teaching in the his- 
tory of Western civilization in 
his second year of graduate 
study and, in his third year, in 
the teaching of American his- 
tory. He will prepare in each of 
these fields in the summer be- 
fore he undertakes his teaching 
responsibility, and he will receive 
graduate credit and be examined 
lor proficiency in these fields by 
the end of his third year of 
graduate study. The grant will 
also provide summer fellowship 
awards. 

Ralph E. Morrow, chairman of 
the Washington University de- 
partment of history, enumerated 
five objectives the program will 
accomplish: 

1. It will reduce the "stretch- 
out" in preparing college teach- 
ers. The plan of graduate studies 
and the provisions for financial 
support offer to students with 
the A.B. degree maximum oppor- 
tunities for completing the re- 
quirements for the Ph. D., in- 
cluding experience in teaching 
and a dissertation, in four 
calendar years. 

2. It will put graduate train- 
ing on a full twelve-month 
rather than a nine- or ten- 
month basis. 

3. It will fully integrate train- 
ing in teaching with graduate 
study. The program will fully 
connect the teaching function 
of the doctor of history with 
other scholarly functions. 

4. It will provide the graduate 
student with extensive and 
supervised practice in the con- 
duct of class discussion and the 
delivery of lectures, as well as 
in such matters as writing 
examinations and preparing 
syllabuses. Under the program, 
experience in teaching becomes 
an integral element of the 
graduate program and not a 
mere device to finance graduate 
studies or to fill out the teach- 
ing staff. 

5. It will equip every Ph.D. 
candidate with a broad, firm 
grasp of the history of Western 
civilization and the history of 
the United States, two courses 
offered in almost every junior 
college, teachers' college and 
liberal arts college. 



People do not like to picture 
themselves under burning metal 
and broken glass, Mason adds. 
"But we have to shock them, 
hurt them with the truth and 
then tell them how to avoid it. 

"The fear that it can happen 
to you is realistic. Our court- 



r-*»«l 




Consultants and school journalists enjoying luncheon during the Southern Regional 
School Press Institute, Savannah Stote College, February 7-8, 1963. Seated at the 
speaker's table from left to right are: J. Randolph Fisher, Instructor, Savannah State 
College; Russel Young, Public Relations, Coca-Cola Bottling Company, Baltimore, Md.; 
Mrs. Lillian Scott, wife, Director of Press Institute; Andrew Hatcher, Associate Press 
Secretary, The White House, Washington, D. C; Dr. Otto McClarrin (Luncheon Speaker), 
Public Relations Director, United States-Nigerian Foundation for the Ojika Memorial 
Hospital Center; President W. K. Payne, Savannah State College; Dr. Joseph Bradford, 
Information Specialist, United States Department of Agriculture, Washington, D. C; 
Abram Eisenman, Publisher and Editor, Savannah Sun; Marion Jackson, Sports Editor, 
Atlanta Daily World, Atlanta, Georgia; Wilton C. Scott, Director, Southern Regional 
School Press Institute. Standing; E. J. Josey, Toastmaster for the occasion and Librarian, 
Savannah State College. 



SSC Librarian 
Research Will Be 
Published in Japan 

Dr. Joseph H. Reason, Execu- 
tive Secretary of the Association 
of College and Research 
Libraries, a Division of the 
American Library Association, 
informed E. J. Josey, Librarian, 
Savannah State College, that 
"The Secretary General of the 
Japan Library Association has 
written us requesting permission 
to translate your article 'The 
Role of the College Library Staff 
in instruction in the Use of the 
Library' which appeared in Col- 
lege and Kesearch Libraries, No- 
vember, 1962. The Association 
wishes to publish the translation 
in its journal Gendai-No 
Toshokan (The Modern Li- 
braries)." 

Mr. Josey granted permission 
for the translation. This article 
was the result of research con- 
ducted by the Savannah State 
College Librarian. Mr. Josey 
made a survey of 500 university 
and college libraries of the 
United States in order to ascer- 
tain the extent of instruction in 
library use in these institutions. 
In addition an effort was made 
to assess the role of the library 
staff in the process. 



rooms are too sterile. There is a 
conscious attitude to underplay 
emotion. We have to bring out 
these feelings and bring it home 
to drivers that a life is involved 
in every traffic accident." 

Eighty to 90 per cent of 
aviation accidents are due to 
emotional factors and conse- 
quences of pilot errors, Mason 
notes. And he believes the same 
probably is true where auto- 
mobiles are concerned. 



Dietitian Appointed 

At Johns Hopkins 

Miss Drucilla Moore, daughter 
of Mr. and Mrs. P. S. Moore, has 
received an appointment as a 
Therapuetic Dietitian at the 
Johns Hopkins Hospital, Balti- 
more, Maryland. She is a mem- 
ber of a staff of 22 dietitians. 




Miss Moore, a graduate of Sa- 
vannah State College in the 
class of '61 completed the intern- 
ship in dietetics at Freedmen's 
Hospital, Washington, D. C. in 
September 1962. 

Miss Moore is a member of The 
American Dietetic Association 
and the Delta Sigma Theta 
Sorority. She is also a member 
of the First African Baptist 
Church, Savannah, Georgia. 



A NEW RETREAT 

(ACP)— Thanks to gifts from 
the graduating classes of 1959, 
1960 and 1962, the University of 
Utah, Salt Lake City, has a new 
recreation room in the student 
union for rest, relaxation, soft 
drinks, music and dancing. The 
Daily Utah Chronicle says the 
Cork Room's focal point of decor 
is a large black iron ball hanging 
from a long chain. 



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SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 



March, 1963 



SSC Budget Asst. Dies 

Mrs. Johnnie Mae Hill, Budget 
Assistant, Savannah State Col- 
lege, died February 28th at her 
home. 

She was a graduate of Savan- 
nah State College and had been 
employed at the college since 
January 1948. In June 1962 upon 
the resignation of E. A. Bertrand, 
she became Acting Comptroller 
until sickness made it impossible 
for her to serve. She was a mem- 
ber of the First Bryan Baptist 
Church and the Keyboarders 
Secretarial Club, Savannah State 
College. 

Surviving are her husband, 
Raymond H. Hill, I; a son, Ray- 
mond H. Hill, II; mother, Mrs. 
Etta Lee Smith, all of Savannah; 
father, Wesley Smith and grand- 
father, John A. Smith, both of 
Washington, D. C; and an aunt, 
Mrs. Rosa Scott, Philadelphia, 
Pa. 



Problem of Financing 
Faculty Salaries 

The day has gone when the 
college could play a game of 
hide and seek about matters of 
finance involved in administra- 
tive responsibility. The average 
citizen is now aware that the 
value of the college education 
which his son or daughter is 
getting largely depends on the 
way in which money is spent by 
the college of his choice — how 
much for libraries, how much for 
research, how much for instruc- 
tion. 

College money matters can no 
longer be swept under the rug. 
They are out in the open, and 
because they are, a new ana- 
lytical approach to college and 
university financial problems is 
becoming more common today. 

One of the biggest problems 
tackled through the new ap- 
proach, in the South as else- 
where, is faculty salaries. The 
crux of the problem is pin- 
pointed in this quotation from 
the President's Committee on 
Education Beyond the High 
School. 

"The plain fact is that the col- 
lege teachers of the United 
States, through their inadequate 
salaries, are subsidizing the 
education of students, and in 
some cases the luxuries of their 
families, by an amount which 
is more than double the grand 
total of alumni gifts, corporate 
gifts and endowment income of 
all colleges and universities com- 
bined." 



Statement of Receipts and Disbursements 

June 2, 1962 - November 9, 1962 
Scholarship Fund Account 

Receipts: 

Balance June 1, 1962 $ 811.36 

Contributions 1,112.10 

Interest 3.57 

Total Receipts $1,827.03 

Expenditures; 

Checks returned— NSF 107.00 

Total Expenditures 107.00 

Receipts over Expenditures 1,720.03 

Balance on Deposit as of November 8, 1962 $1,720.03 

General Dues Account 

Receipts: 

Balance June 1, 1962 $ 380.61 

Dues 395.25 

Interest .74 

Total Receipts $ 776.60 

Expenditures: 

Kennickell Printing Co 38.85 

Levy Jewelers 39.55 

Western Union Tel. Co 14.50 

Place Cards .50 

Wolf Musicenter 198.25 

Alumni Banquet 202.50 

Total Expenditures 588.15 

Receipts over Expenditures $ 188.45 

Sinking Fund Account 

Receipts: 

Balance $ 419.68 

Interest 7.33 

Total Receipts $ 427.01 

Expenditures: 

Bobby DUworth Band 20.00 

Tremont Inn 15.00 

Total Expenditures 35.00 

Receipts over Expenditures $ 392.01 

Prince Mitchell, Treasurer 

NATIONAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

Schedule of Contributions Received 
June 2, 1962 - November 9, 1962 



Bulloch County Chapter $112.00 

Mrs. Josie Sessoms 4.50 

Athens Chapter 75.50 

Mrs. Nancy Walker 50.00 

Mr. Cleo Love 8.00 

Mrs. Rosa L. Boles 7.00 

Mr. James Whatley 7.00 

Mrs. Inez Love Griffin 7.50 

Mrs. Daisy Parker 7.00 

Mrs. Eloise George 8.50 

Mrs. Hilda Shaw Johnson 7.00 

Mrs. Mattie Inez Jackson 5.00 

Savannah Chapter 325.00 

Mrs.Bernice Jordan 7.00 

Mrs. Marvis J. Brown 7.00 

Mrs. Delores M. Atterberry 7.00 

Mrs. Leanna Wilcox 107.50 

Miss Sarah A. Reynolds 5.00 

Mr. & Mrs. Curtis P. Harris 15.00 

Mr. Jesse A. Stevens 8.50 

Mrs. Willie J. Simmons 7.00 



Miss Nettye A. Handy 8.50 

Mr. James Dean 7.00 

Mrs. Laura E. Batten 7.00 

Mrs. Mary B. Trawick 10.00 

Christer Lee Caddy 8.50 

Mr. J. C. Douglass 7.00 

Mr. Charles S. Tottle, Sr. . 7.00 

Mrs. Julia C. Butler 7.00 

Mrs. Ruth C. Walker 10.00 

Ardelnea G. Issaac 5.00 

Mr. J. E. Clarke 15.00 

Mr. R. L. Smith 7.00 

Mrs. Blanch Nelson 10.00 

Mrs. Sarah W. T. Molette 5.00 

Mrs. Elizabeth L. C. Taylor 7.00 

Mr. Edward C. Curry 7.00 

Mr. Alfred W. Bass 7.00 

C. A. Presley 7.00 

Transfer from Savannah 

State 82.10 




SSC Graduate Serves 

As Teacher-Counselor 

Harold B. Fields '52, Teacher- 
Counselor at Tattnall High 
School is doing a wonderful job 
and contributing to his Alma 
Mater. 

Mr. Fields has done advance 
work at West Virginia State 
College, Institute, West Virginia, 
Michigan State University, 
Lansing, Michigan, and Atlanta 
University, Atlanta, Georgia. 

While at Savannah State Col- 
lege he was an active participant 
in basketball, football, and track. 




Miss Flora Braxton, a 1962 graduate of 
Savannah State College, is now employed 
as Assistant Bookkeeper in the Business 
Office of the College. Miss Braxton is the 
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Dupree Braxton, 
Sr., of Savannah, Georgia. She is an active 
member of the Y.M.C.A. Player's Guild and 
may be seen in a prominent role in "The 
Constant Wife," which will be held on 
March 18, 1963, in the Auditorium of 
Alfred E. Beach High School. 



SAVANNAH STATE COLLEGE 

State College Branch 
SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 



Non-Profit Org. 


U. S. POSTAGE 


PAID 


PERMIT No. 142 



#H 



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